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Lecture on the preservation of George Washington’s boyhood home at Lewes, Del.’s Zwaanendael Museum on Jan. 16, 2016

Date Posted: Friday, January 8th, 2016
Categories:  Historical and Cultural Affairs News

-Listing of museum events through May 2016 also included-

(DOVER, Del.—Jan. 8, 2016)—On Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016 at 2 p.m., the Zwaanendael Museum, located at 102 Kings Highway in Lewes, Del. will host the program “Preservation 50— “I Cannot Tell a Lie, It was Almost a Big Blue: Historic Preservation and Archaeology at Ferry Farm, George Washington’s Boyhood Home,” a lecture by Paul Nasca, Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ curator of archaeology. The lecture will explore preservation through archaeology and the actions taken in Virginia that impacted the historic preservation of one of the nation’s iconic places. It is presented as part of the division’s celebrations marking the 50th anniversary of the passage of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966. The program will take place on the museum’s 2nd floor (entry via staircase; no elevator). Admission is free but, due to space restrictions, reservations are required by calling 302-645-1148 no later than Jan. 15, 2016.

Artistic rendition of the Washington family’s house at Ferry Farm by L.H. Barker, 2008.

Artistic rendition of the Washington family’s house at Ferry Farm by L.H. Barker, 2008.

George Washington was six years old in 1738 when his family moved to a farm in Stafford County, Va. The Washingtons called this place the Home Farm but it later became known as Ferry Farm because people crossed the Rappahannock River on a ferry from the farm to the town of Fredericksburg. In 1996, the Kenmore Association (now known as the George Washington Foundation) saved the property from commercial development and in July 2008, archaeologists finally located and excavated the remains of the Washington family’s house whose location had previously been unknown.

Preservation50 is the United States’ multi-year celebration of the 50th anniversary of the passage of the National Historic Preservation Act. The Act has transformed the face of communities from coast to coast as it established the legal framework and incentives to preserve historic buildings, landscapes and archaeology. Preservation50 reveals the great value that historic preservation delivers to the American people. Its aim is to build a community that leads preservation for the next 50 years.

Preservation50 logo

Paul Nasca has served as the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ curator of archaeology since June 1, 2015. He holds degrees in anthropology from the College of William and Mary (master’s) and the State University of New York at Buffalo (bachelor’s). His experience includes work as an archaeologist/collections manager for the City of Alexandria, Va.; as a staff archaeologist for the George Washington Foundation in Fredericksburg, Va.; as an archaeological conservator for the College of William and Mary; and as a field technician for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation and the Old Fort Niagara Association. His article, “Washington’s Boyhood Home,” was published in Smithsonian Magazine in 2008.

Paul Nasca

Paul Nasca

The Zwaanendael Museum was built in 1931 to commemorate the 300th anniversary of the state’s first European colony, Swanendael, established by the Dutch along Hoorn Kill (present-day Lewes-Rehoboth Canal) in 1631. Designed by E. William Martin (architect of Legislative Hall and the Hall of Records in Dover), the museum is modeled after the town hall in Hoorn, the Netherlands, and features a stepped facade gable with carved stonework and decorated shutters. The museum’s exhibits and presentations provide a showcase for Lewes-area maritime, military and social history.

Zwaanendael Museum

Zwaanendael Museum

Following is a schedule of Zwaanendael-Museum-sponsored special events through May 2016. All listed programs take place at the Zwaanendael Museum located at 102 Kings Highway, Lewes, Del. Museum hours from Nov. 1 to March 31 are Wednesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. From April 1 to Oct. 31, museum hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; and Sunday, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. All listed programs are free and open to the public. For additional information, call 302-645-1148.

Zwaanendael Museum special events through May 2016

 Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016
Preservation50—‘I Cannot Tell a Lie, It was Almost a Big Blue: Historic Preservation and Archaeology at Ferry Farm, George Washington’s Boyhood Home.’ ” Lecture by Paul Nasca, Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ curator of archaeology, on Preservation Through Archaeology and the actions taken in Virginia that impacted the historic preservation of one of the nation’s iconic places. Presented in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the passage of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.2 p.m. Due to space restrictions, reservations are required by calling 302-645-1148 no later than Jan. 15, 2016.

Saturday, Feb. 6, 2016
Painting a Portrait: Crystals and Hoodoo Aboard the H.M.S. DeBraak. African-American History Month presentation by Fran Mahon on African religious practices in the 18th century and the possibility that some of the crew members aboard the British warship that sank off the Delaware coast in 1798 may have been of African descent. 2 p.m. Due to space restrictions, reservations are required by calling 302-645-1148 no later than Feb. 5, 2016.

Saturday, Feb. 13, 2016
Preservation50—‘Preserving History of the African American Culture in Delaware: New Found Stories from Sussex County.’ ” Presentation by historian Bev Laing and researcher Carlton Hall of the State Historic Preservation Office on newly found documentation of stories of African-American life in 19th and 20th century Delaware. Presented in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the passage of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966. 2 p.m. Due to space restrictions, reservations are required by calling 302-645-1148 no later than Feb. 12, 2016.

Saturday, March 12, 2016
Preservation50—‘The National Register of Historic Places Program: A Profile of Sussex County’s Listings.’ ” Madeline Dunn, National Register coordinator for the State Historic Preservation Office, will explain the program and its eligibility requirements. Presented in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the passage of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966. 2 p.m. Due to space restrictions, reservations are required by calling 302-645-1148 no later than March 11, 2016.

Thursday–Saturday, April 7–16, 2016
Lewes Tulip Celebration. City-wide series of activities including tours and displays at the Zwaanendael Museum. Sponsored by the Lewes Chamber of Commerce. Downtown Lewes. 302-645-8073.

Saturday, April 16, 2016
Dutch-American Friendship Day. Discover Delaware’s Dutch roots and learn how that connection is alive today. 10 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

Saturday, April 30, 2016
King’s Day. Celebration of the birthday of King Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands in a program that will also explore royal titles and Delaware’s Dutch connection.10 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

Saturday, May 28, 2016
Fifth Annual Zwaanendael Maritime Celebration: “A Sailor’s Life for Me.” Maritime-themed activities, games, displays by local organizations and more. 10 a.m.–3 p.m.

Zwaanendael Museum exhibits and displays

Ongoing
Delaware and the War of 1812.” Exhibit examines the service and sacrifice of Delawareans of 1812 to 1815, and the important role that the state played in a conflict that helped shaped the development of the United States.

Ongoing
Discovering Delaware’s Maritime Past.” Display explores the DeBraak, a shipwrecked 18th-century British warship including a photo of the hull recovery, reproductions of items aboard ship, and a model of the vessel.

Ongoing
A Seaborne Citizenry: The DeBraak and Its Atlantic World.” Exhibit utilizes artifacts recovered from His Majesty’s Sloop of War DeBraak, a British warship that sank off the Delaware coast on May 25, 1798 to tell the story of the vessel, its crew and the historical context within which it operated in the Atlantic World of the late 18th century.

-End-

Contact:
Jim
Yurasek
Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs
Phone: 302-736-7413
E-mail: Jim.Yurasek@state.de.us
Web: http://history.delaware.gov

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