DNREC Coastal Cleanup Encourages Residents and Visitors to Clean Up Trash Close to Home

This year, the 33rd annual Delaware Coastal Cleanup will transition from a one-day, in-person event to a month-long campaign to keep the state’s beaches and waterways free of trash, DNREC announced today.

“Following the lead of other states and guidance from the Ocean Conservancy, Delaware’s Coastal Cleanup Program will not include large organized group cleanups this year,” said DNREC Secretary Shawn Garvin. “Although we will not have the traditional gatherings at specific beaches and coastal areas statewide on the usual September Saturday, the Delaware Coastal Cleanup’s message remains the same — we can all make a difference to keep our beaches, waterways and wetlands clean and free of trash.”

In the spirit of the Coastal Cleanup, all Delawareans and visitors are encouraged make a special effort during the month of September to keep communities and natural areas in the First State clean through personal commitment and support of the Governor’s Keep DE Litter Free initiative. Volunteers will be able to report their findings all month long on the Delaware Coastal Cleanup app. Additional details, including how to download the updated app will be posted later this month on de.gov/coastalcleanup.

Cleaning up locally makes a big difference statewide and keeps trash from entering waterways and making its way to beaches. Last year, nearly 2,000 volunteers with the Delaware Coastal Cleanup collected 3.6 tons of trash and recyclables littering more than 125 miles of Delaware’s waterways and coastline.

DNREC suggests several ways to make a difference all year long:

  • Pick up trash near your home to keep your neighborhood clean.
  • Follow a carry-in/carry out plan and take all trash with you when visiting outdoor spaces, like Delaware State Parks, wildlife areas, reserves, county or local parks.
  • Pack a disposable bag and rubber gloves when you take a walk, go for a hike, go hunting or fishing, etc., to collect and carry out trash you find along the way.
  • Recycle applicable items through in-home recycling or designated drop-off locations. Learn more at Delaware Recycles.

DNREC reminds everyone to wear gloves when picking up trash, wash hands thoroughly after cleanup activities, be mindful of social distancing requirements, wear face coverings when near others, follow all public area protocols and be safe.

For more information, visit Delaware Coastal Cleanup or email DNREC_Coastal_Cleanup@delaware.gov.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. For more information, visit the website and connect with DNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Nikki Lavoie, nikki.lavoie@delaware.gov, Joanna Wilson, Joanna.wilson@delaware.gov

###


DNREC’s Basic Hunter Education Course Only Available Online and at No Cost

Basic Hunter Education Course Field Day Participation (Photo: DNREC)

 

Due to COVID-19 restrictions, the classroom portion of the Basic Hunter Education Course will only be available online and at no cost to participants. After completing the online course, participants will attend a free, in-person field day for an abbreviated two hours where COVID-19 safety requirements will be implemented. The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control administers the hunter education program through the Division of Fish and Wildlife Hunter Education Program.

To complete the 2020/2021 Basic Hunter Education Course, participants need to:

  • Take the approved online Basic Hunter Education Course using a link available through https://dnrec.alpha.delaware.gov/fish-wildlife/hunter-education/. The expanded online course is currently free of charge to all participants and consists of two parts, the traditional online course and an added virtual field day segment.
  • Read and acknowledge the Delaware Laws and Regulations presentation available through https://dnrec.alpha.delaware.gov/fish-wildlife/hunter-education/.
  • Sign-up for an in-person Field Day for Internet Course Graduates Course using the new ePermitting system https://epermitting.dnrec.delaware.gov/permits-and-licenses. Field Day Courses will last for two hours and be held at the Little Creek Hunter Education Training Center located at 3018 Bayside Drive in Dover. Students will participate in live-fire firearm instruction and be tested on hunting safety topics to include Delaware laws and regulations when they attend their in-person field day course.Hunters born after Jan. 1, 1967, are required to successfully complete the Basic Hunter Education Course to obtain a Delaware Hunting License. Participants must be 10 years of age or older to take any Hunter Education Program course.

The Basic Hunter Education Course teaches students safety, ethics, firearm types, safe gun handling, marksmanship techniques, specialty hunting techniques, wildlife management, wildlife identification, survival and Delaware hunting laws and regulations, as well as other hunter safety-related topics. All Basic Hunter Education Course students must participate in a live firearm firing session with a trained instructor.

The Delaware Hunter Education Program was first established in the early 1970s to help educate hunters in safe hunting practices and to reduce hunting-related accidents. Since 1967, more than 35,000 hunters have completed hunter safety courses and received hunter safety cards in Delaware, with a substantial decrease in hunting-related accidents.

For more information, contact the Division of Fish and Wildlife hunter education office at 302-735-3600 x1.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. The Division of Fish and Wildlife conserves and manages Delaware’s fish and wildlife and their habitats, and provides fishing, hunting, wildlife viewing and boating access on nearly 65,000 acres of public land. For more information, visit the website and connect with DNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov; Joanna Wilson, joanna.wilson@delaware.gov

###


DNREC Lifts Recreational Swimming Advisory for Rehoboth Beach

DNREC lifted the recreational swimming advisory for Rehoboth Beach at Rehoboth Avenue late Friday afternoon after water quality tests taken Thursday showed bacteria levels had returned below the advisory level.

The advisory had been issued Thursday based on results from Wednesday’s regularly scheduled sampling by DNREC’s Recreational Water Program. Ocean beach swimming advisories based on bacteria levels usually end after a day or so.

DNREC water quality experts say the elevated level of bacteria that caused the Rehoboth advisory is most likely associated with rainfall that occurred on Tuesday night. These bacteria often originate from wildlife sources and increased rainfall, waves or wildlife feeding near the surf (shorebirds, marine mammals or other warm-blooded animals), which can result in these indicator bacteria washing into near-shore waters.

The current advisory status and history of test results for monitored recreational waters in Delaware, including ocean and bay beaches as well as some inland ponds, is at https://recwaters.dnrec.delaware.gov/. Anyone can sign up at the site to be notified of water advisories when they are issued.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. For more information, visit the website and connect with DNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contact: Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov

###


DNREC Young Environmentalists of the Year Announced at Delaware State Fair

Governor John Carney and DNREC Secretary Shawn M. Garvin give Charli Evans, center, a big thumbs-up
as DNREC’s Elementary School Young Environmentalist of the Year at the Delaware State Fair.
DNREC photo.

Today at the Delaware State Fair in Harrington, a group of dedicated Delaware students were honored for their work to protect, restore or enhance our state’s natural resources as Governor John Carney and DNREC Secretary Shawn M. Garvin announced this year’s recipients of the DNREC Young Environmentalists of the Year Awards.

“Every Delawarean, no matter their age, can have an impact in protecting and conserving our natural resources, while also raising awareness for environmental stewardship. At ages 7 to 16, these young people have taken a stand as environmental advocates who are already making a difference today for a better tomorrow,” said Secretary Garvin. “We are inspired by the award winners’ dedication to making our state a better place to live through their time and talents, and we look forward to seeing what they will do in the years to come.”

Elementary School:

  •  Charli Rose Evans, age 7, of Laurel, practices self-sustaining farming techniques, growing food for her family and saving the seeds to replant her garden, which also helps feed her chickens, ducks and goats. Charli even makes her own garden fertilizer by composting food waste to mix with manure from her animals.

Middle School:

  •  Lilyan Farris, age 10, of Bridgeville, is dedicated to “reduce, reuse and recycle” to help children in need by collecting and cleaning used books, board games, puzzles, art supplies and bicycles. Lilyan has kept more than 3,000 books out of landfills to stock little free libraries and rescued 25 bicycles last year for an organization that collects and fixes up used bikes.
  •  Catherine Shapiro, age 14, of Wilmington, is a student leader in Springer Middle School’s Energy Club, with activities including conducting a school energy audit, organizing an eco-event, advocating water conservation and carbon footprint reduction, and surveying biodiversity and pollinators.

High School:

  •  Noor Boukari, age 16, of Dover, advocates for sustainability, conducted an award-winning study on bee population decline and received national recognition for her panel discussion and interviews on “Women and Green Futures” at Social Builders US.
  • Maisie Donohue, age 15, of Wilmington, is an environmental activist who is passionate about climate change education and environmentally friendly diets. Maisie served on the YES! Committee to plan a youth summit for 1,000 students in February and is an accomplished public speaker and budding lobbyist, participating in events such the University of Delaware’s Youth Climate Strike last fall.

Now in its 27th year, DNREC’s Young Environmentalist of the Year Awards program recognizes Delaware students whose actions have helped protect, restore or enhance our natural resources by initiating an innovative project, practicing environmental stewardship, increasing public awareness or demonstrating environmental ethics. For more information, visit dnrec.alpha.delaware.gov/young-environmentalists.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. For more information, visit the website and connect with DNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Joanna Wilson, joanna.wilson@delaware.gov; Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov

###


DNREC Issues Recreational Swimming Advisory for Rehoboth Beach

DNREC has issued a recreational swimming advisory for Rehoboth Beach at Rehoboth Avenue based on elevated levels of bacteria found in a sample taken Wednesday by the Department’s environmental scientists.

The elevated levels of bacteria is most likely associated with rainfall that occurred on Tuesday night. These bacteria often originate from wildlife sources and increased rainfall, waves or wildlife feeding near the surf (shorebirds, marine mammals or other warm-blooded animals), which can result in these indicator bacteria washing into near-shore waters.

DNREC’s Recreational Water Program staff is collecting another water sample, with results from it available Friday afternoon, at which time a decision will be made to lift the current recreational swimming advisory or to extend it. Ocean beach swimming advisories usually can be ended after a day or so.

The City of Rehoboth Beach has been notified of the recreational advisory, and notice has gone out on DNREC’s Recreational Water advisory notification listserv.

Additional information on recreational swimming advisories and DNREC’s water testing program, and instructions on how to join the advisory notification list, can be found at https://dnrec.alpha.delaware.gov/watershed-stewardship/assessment/recreational-water-monitoring/

The current advisory status for DNREC-monitored beaches and water bodies is at https://recwaters.dnrec.delaware.gov/.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. The Division of Watershed Stewardship develops and implements innovative watershed assessment, monitoring and implementation activities. For more information, visit the website and connect with DNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contact: Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov

###