Funding Available for Tree-Planting Projects

More than 120,000 trees have been planted since the Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative (TEDI) began in November 2021.

Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative (TEDI) Proposals Due July 1

State agencies and non-governmental organizations with 501(c)(3) status have until July 1 to submit funding request proposals for reforestation projects through the Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative (TEDI).

TEDI, administered through the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control Division of Climate, Coastal and Energy and the Delaware Department of Agriculture’s Delaware Forest Service launched last November. The initiative works with partners to enhance and support tree plantings throughout the state, with a goal of planting at least one tree for every Delawarean.

Planting trees is a nature-based solution to reducing greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, playing a critical role in helping fight climate change. TEDI is part of the state’s comprehensive plan to respond to climate change and supports Delaware’s Climate Action Plan.

Funding requests can include multiple projects and may range from $5,000 to $20,000.

Applications must be submitted to DNREC’s Division of Climate, Coastal and Energy by 5 p.m. on Friday, July 1. Visit the TEDI website for more information about the program and the requirements of the call for proposals, or email questions to TEDI@delaware.gov.

Delawareans can join in the Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative by tracking trees they plant on their own property and inputting the information in the TEDI Tracker, which can be found at de.gov/tedi.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. The DNREC Division of Climate, Coastal and Energy uses science, education, policy development and incentives to address Delaware’s climate, energy and coastal challenges. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov or Jim Lee, Jamesw.lee@delaware.gov

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Gov. Carney Celebrates 150th Arbor Day in Rehoboth Beach

Promotes his “Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative” to Plant One Million Trees

 

Photos at Delaware Forest Service  Flickr Album

REHOBOTH BEACH, Del. (May 6, 2022) – Governor John C. Carney, Jr. celebrated the 150th Anniversary of Arbor Day at Rehoboth Elementary School by spotlighting his “Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative” in a ceremony attended by members of the General Assembly, state and local officials, schoolchildren, and their families. Governor Carney recognized two of Delaware’s 14 Tree City USA communities – the City of Rehoboth Beach for 31 years and Dover Air Force Base for 30 years – and also honored student winners in the annual Arbor Day School Poster Contest. The event culminated with the planting of 10 native trees on the school campus.

Gov. Carney and Gustavsen
Governor carney took photos with New Castle County kindergarten poster winner Issac Gustavsen and his family.

Featured speakers included Rehoboth Elementary Principal Dr. Doris Person, Rehoboth Beach Mayor Stan Mills, Education Secretary Dr. Mark Holodick, Agriculture Secretary Michael T. Scuse, DNREC Secretary Shawn Garvin, and Delaware State Forester Michael Valenti. Honored guests included Speaker of the House Peter Schwartzkopf (D-14), Senator Ernesto B. Lopez (R-6), Senator David L. Wilson (R-18), Rep. Stephen Smyk (R-20), and Rehoboth city officials.

“Last year, we introduced Delaware’s Climate Action Plan  to confront the threat of climate change on our coastlines and across our state,” said Governor John Carney. “Reducing emissions is essential to improving the state’s environmental health and the Tree for Every Delaware Initiative will help us in this effort.”

Rehoboth Poster Winners
Governor Carney joined Rehoboth Elementary School principal Dr. Doris Person, teacher Jacqueline Kisiel, and school poster winners after the event.

“What I love about Arbor Day is that we are teaching our children the importance of trees and the environment not just in theory but with hands-on action. Planting a tree is a simple act that we can do together as a community on a day like today and something many students and their families can do at home or in their community,” Secretary of Education Mark Holodick said.

“Arbor Day is a perfect day to highlight TEDI – the Governor’s Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative – with its goal of planting one million trees, approximately one for every Delawarean,” said DNREC Secretary Shawn M. Garvin. “We encourage Delawareans of all ages to join us in planting trees to reach this goal and help create a healthier planet.”

Delaware State Forester Michael Valenti recognized Mayor Stan Mills and the City of Rehoboth Beach for 31 years as a Tree City USA. Dover Air Force Base accepted recognition from Gov. Carney for its 30 years as a Tree City USA. View the complete list of Delaware’s 14 Tree City USA communities.

“This year’s poster contest theme is “Trees are Terrific – for Today and Tomorrow!” highlighting how trees we plant today ensure a better life for us now and for countless generations to come,” said Secretary of Agriculture Michael T. Scuse. “The Department of Agriculture, the Delaware Forest Service, and its Urban and Community Program work year-round with citizens all over Delaware to harness the power of trees to transform communities. We have a staff of professional foresters who offer technical assistance to help homeowners select the best tree species, plant the right tree in the right place, and learn how to nurture and care for their trees.”

Fifth-grader Lilly Bartlett of Allen Frear Elementary School in Camden was the state winner of the Arbor Day Poster Contest. A record number of entries participated this year: almost 9,500 students from more than 75 schools submitted posters.  View the complete gallery at http://de.gov/arbordaypostercontest.

State Winner Lilly Bartlett
Lilly Bartlett of Allen Frear Elementary in Camden was the State Winner of the Arbor Day Poster Contest, shown here with her parents Stephanie and John Bartlett.

 

Girl Scout Troop #172
Governor Carney, Rehoboth Mayor Stan Mills, and cabinet officials recognized Girl Scout Troop #172 for helping wrap seedlings for this year’s Arbor Day Poster Contest participants.

 

 

Gov. Carney ARBOR DAY
Governor Carney highlight the TEDI program and stressed the need to plant more trees in the First State.

 

Garvin
DNREC Secretary Shawn Garvin highlighted the Governor’s “Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative” and the effort to plant one million trees in the First State.

 

Rehoboth and Dover Air Force Base Tree City USAs
Rehoboth Beach celebrated 31 years as a Tree City USA while Dover Air Force Base reached the 30 year mark this year.

 


Allen Frear Elementary Student Wins Arbor Day Poster Contest

Photo: Lilly Bartlett, a fifth-grader from Allen Frear Elementary School in Camden, is the winner of the Arbor Day School Poster Contest.

DOVER, Del. — Lilly Bartlett, a fifth-grader from Allen Frear Elementary School in Camden, is the overall winner of the Delaware Forest Service’s annual Arbor Day School Poster Contest. This year’s competition attracted almost 9,500 entries from more than 75 schools. The theme – “Trees Are Terrific…for Today and Tomorrow!” – highlights the long-lasting impact of planting a tree and the many benefits it provides for the future. The complete gallery of winners is at de.gov/arbordaypostercontest

Since 1872, Arbor Day has been observed as a special day to plant trees and celebrate their many benefits!  

2022 marks the 150th anniversary of the first Arbor Day in Nebraska.

The poster contest is designed to increase knowledge about trees and forests while helping students learn about the direct impact of trees on community health and well-being. Trees not only provide beauty but help shade streets and schoolyards while also creating habitat and food for wildlife. Trees planted today will be terrific “tomorrow” as they improve air quality, muffle noise, moderate air temperatures, filter run-off into streams and rivers, and reduce energy consumption.

The poster contest is open to all K-5 public, private, homeschool, after-school, and other organized youth groups.  Posters are judged on originality, use of theme, neatness, and artistic expression. Each winner receives a gift card, a tree-themed book, and a tree planting at their school.  Twelve winners are selected, one from each county, in four grade categories: kindergarten, grades 1 and 2, grades 3 and 4, and grade 5. All participating classes receive free loblolly pine seedlings delivered to their school, just in time to celebrate Arbor Day!

The 12 winners will be invited to the annual State Arbor Day Celebration, hosted by Governor John Carney and currently scheduled for May 6.

Thanks to the generosity of corporate partner Delmarva Power, a tree planting ceremony will also be held at each winner’s school to celebrate Arbor Day. For questions and more information, contact: Ashley Melvin, Trainer-Educator  ashley.melvin@delaware.gov

 

New Castle County

Kindergarten: Isaac Gustavsen, Brandywine Springs School, Wilmington

Grades 1 to 2:  Nicole Yu, North Star Elementary, Hockessin

Grades 3 to 4: Gavin Chee, North Star Elementary, Hockessin

Grade 5: Sinai Weathers, Linden Hill Elementary, Wilmington

 

Kent County

Kindergarten: Tammoni Anderson, Booker T. Washington Elementary, Dover

Grades 1 to 2: Ben Austin, Allen Frear Elementary, Camden

Grades 3 to 4: Eliana Oberdick, W. B. Simpson Elementary, Wyoming

Grade 5: Lilly Bartlett, Allen Frear Elementary, Camden

 

Sussex County

Kindergarten: Asher Dukes, St. John’s Preschool, Seaford

Grades 1 to 2: Lyla Deck, Lord Baltimore Elementary, Ocean View

Grades 3 to 4: Emily Morris, Epworth Christian, Laurel

Grade 5: Annaleisyia Strangman, Rehoboth Elementary, Rehoboth Beach

Gallery of Winners  **** (click on image to view high-resolution file)

New Castle County


Isaac GustavsenKindergarten
Isaac Gustavsen
Brandywine Springs School

Nicole YuGrades 1 and 2
Nicole Yu
North Star Elementary

Gavin CheeGrades 3 and 4
Gavin Chee
North Star Elementary

Sinai Weathers

Grade 5
Sinai Weathers
Linden Hill Elementary

Kent County


Tammoni Anderson

Kindergarten
Tammoni Anderson
Booker T. Washington Elementary

Ben AustinGrades 1 and 2
Ben Austin
Allen Frear Elementary

Eliana Oberdick

Grades 3 and 4
Eliana Oberdick
W. B. Simpson Elementary

Lilly Bartlett

Grade 5
Lilly Bartlett
Allen Frear Elementary

STATE WINNER!

Sussex County


Asher DukesKindergarten
Asher Dukes
St. John’s Preschool

Lyla DeckGrades 1 and 2
Lyla Deck
Lord Baltimore Elementary

Emily Morris

Grades 3 and 4
Emily Morris
Epworth Christian

Annaleisyia Strangman

Grade 5
Annaleisyia Strangman
Rehoboth Elementary


Governor, Secretaries Dig into Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative

 Gov. John Carney joined Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control Secretary Shawn M. Garvin, Department of Agriculture Secretary Michael T. Scuse and volunteers April 11 to plant trees on farmland recently acquired by DNREC’s Division of Parks and Recreation for Killens Pond State Park. Pictured, from left to right, STRIVE program student Richard Bebber, Sen. Dave Lawson, Secretary Scuse, Gov. Carney, Bank of American volunteer Crystal Clough and Secretary Garvin plant a ceremonial white oak tree on the property.

 

In recognition of Earth Month and as part of the Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative, Gov. John Carney joined Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control Secretary Shawn M. Garvin, Department of Agriculture Secretary Michael T. Scuse and volunteers Monday to plant trees on land recently acquired by the DNREC Division of Parks and Recreation in Felton.

In November, Gov. Carney kicked off the Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative (TEDI) with the goal of planting 1 million trees – or one tree for every Delaware resident. DNREC and DDA are adding hundreds of trees to that number through multiple TEDI plantings this spring, with several happening at Delaware State Parks.

Gov. Carney encouraged all Delawareans to join the fight against climate change by planting trees this spring.

“Delaware is not only a coastal state, it is also the country’s lowest-lying state and climate change is a very real threat to our future,” said Gov. Carney. “We need your help to reduce our carbon footprint and accomplish our commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 26% by 2025. One simple yet effective way you can help reach that goal is to plant trees in your yards, public spaces, schools and other places in their communities, the benefits of which will be seen for generations to come.”

Volunteers from Bank of America and Dover High School yesterday planted about 100 trees funded by the initiative on the property, which expands Killens Pond State Park west to Route 13 and protects the main water source that feeds the pond at Killens – the Murderkill River. The Governor and Secretaries planted a ceremonial white oak tree, which is commonly found along the river.

“Trees play a crucial role in combating climate change and this TEDI planting is the perfect way to get new trees in the ground while recognizing volunteerism, the preservation of natural areas and open spaces, and Earth Month, which we celebrate every day at DNREC,” Secretary Garvin said. “I am grateful for the Bank of America staff and Dover High School STRIVE students who volunteered their time today to help expand Delaware’s tree canopy for the benefit of our planet and enjoyment of visitors to Killens Pond State Park.”

“Since its inception, the Delaware Forest Service’s Urban and Community Forestry Grant Program has provided almost $1.85 million in matching tree grants for more than 585 projects in the First State – with more than 16,500 trees planted,” Secretary Scuse said. “This year, thanks to our cooperative partnerships with DNREC and the Governor’s Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative, it is my pleasure to announce we will be providing almost $137,000 to fund 23 community tree projects resulting in the planting of 2,950 trees.”

The 52-acre property, comprised of farmland and natural areas, lies within the riparian buffer of the Murderkill River and was purchased in 2020 through Delaware’s Open Space Program, administered by the Division of Parks and Recreation. The land grows Killens Pond State Park to nearly 1,500 acres and expands recreational opportunities for the park’s visitors.

Downstream and within the riparian buffer is the 540-acre Murderkill River Nature Preserve, which is managed by the Division of Parks and Recreation Office of Nature Preserves and protects essential wetlands.

The trees planted April 11 will further enhance the river’s water quality by expanding its protective buffer and will help Delaware reach its TEDI goal. TEDI is one key strategy of Delaware’s Climate Action Plan, which aims to offset the carbon emissions that are driving the climate change.

The Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative is a partnership between DDA’s Urban and Community Forestry Program, the DNREC Division of Climate, Coastal and Energy and other stakeholders.

Delawareans can add any trees they plant to the online TEDI Tracker, which shows location and other information about trees planted around the state since 2020. The web page, de.gov/tedi, also provides information on TEDI tree planting volunteer opportunities.

About DNREC

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Enjoy the natural diversity of Delaware’s 17 state parks. Delawareans about the environment. The DNREC Division of Parks and Recreation oversees more than 26,000 acres in 17 state parks and the Brandywine Zoo. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts:

DDA: John Petersen, John.Petersen@delaware.gov or Stacey Hofmann, stacey.hofmann@delaware.gov

DNREC: Shauna McVey, shauna.mcvey@delaware.gov or JamesW.Lee@delaware.gov

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Tubman Bicentennial Tours at Blackbird State Forest

SMYRNA, Del. (March 4, 2022) — Delaware’s Urban and Community Forestry Program is sponsoring “Harriet Tubman Bicentennial Underground Railroad Experience Walking Tours” at Blackbird State Forest to celebrate Harriet Tubman’s unique connection to Blackbird State Forest and commemorate the bicentennial of her birth in 1822. The tours will take place on Sunday, March 20 at 2 p.m. and on Saturday, April 2 at 2 p.m. at Blackbird State Forest, 502 Blackbird Forest Road, Smyrna, 19977.

There is no cost to the public, but space is limited and advance registration is required at https://harriet-tubman-200-blackbird.eventbrite.com/

Download the UGRR Blackbird Tour Flyer

Conductor Dee Patterson
“Conductor” Dee Patterson – acclaimed storyteller, historian and nationally certified cultural interpretive guide – will take participants on a powerful journey on the Underground Railroad to experience the natural world that shaped the inspirational life of Harriet Tubman. Patterson, who brings her unique research-based narratives, poetic storytelling and creative energy to each visitor experience, is the CEO and founder of UGR3DAY Underground Railroad Experiences Inc. (https://ugr3day.com)

Please note: This event features an outdoor two-mile hike requires a moderate level of fitness to keep pace with the tour. Also, attendees should note that the subject matter will include a realistic discussion of slavery and material is intended primarily for adults and children over 12.

2022 marks the 200th anniversary of Tubman’s birth in Maryland. Tubman specifically mentioned a place called “Blackbird” as one of her landmarks as she traveled through Delaware, but her precise pathways and stops there are unknown. It’s possible that Blackbird might have referred to one of the free black communities that existed in the area. Today, the 6,000-acre Blackbird State Forest still evokes the landscapes that freedom-seekers and their guides likely encountered on their perilous journeys northward. Blackbird is an official stop on the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Historic Byway. (http://harriettubmanbyway.org)

Harriet Tubman 200