Funding For Summer and After-School Programs For Teens, Youth Announced

Summer Recreation, Work Readiness, STEM Programs Receive Neighborhood Building Blocks Fund Grants

Attorney General Matt Denn with Pastor Lottie Lee Davis and participants of the Be Ready Community Development Corp.
Attorney General Matt Denn with Pastor Lottie Lee Davis and participants of the Be Ready Community Development Corp.

Summer and after-school programs for teenagers and youth will be up and running around Delaware in the next few months, thanks to more than $900,000 in grants aimed at reducing crime and revitalizing neighborhoods.

Funds for the grants, announced Monday, were allocated to the Neighborhood Building Blocks Fund by the Department of Justice, with the agreement of the General Assembly’s Joint Finance Committee, from settlements with national banks for alleged misconduct in the national financial markets.

“It is not hard to see these days why it is important to provide young men and women with safe and productive activities, which is why I have been committed to get these programs up and running,” said Attorney General Matt Denn, who proposed the allocation plan that included the NBBF. “The groups receiving these grants are part of the effort that we all have to make together to reduce crime and keep kids safe.”

“Too often, students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds make progress in school, only to lose ground once school lets out. The Neighborhood Building Blocks Grants will give teens up and down our state safe and secure places to learn and develop after school and during the summer,” Gov. John Carney said at the event held at the H. Fletcher Brown Boys and Girls Clubs, one of the grant recipients. “Thank you to Attorney General Denn, the Joint Finance Committee, and the grant recipients for working to improve outcomes for Delaware teens.”

Among the stated goals for the grants were addressing unmet needs of high crime areas statewide and improving resources and opportunities for at-risk juveniles and adolescents.

“The Neighborhood Building Blocks award has afforded Be Ready Community Development Corporation the opportunity to engage our youth in the important work of beautifying their own neighborhood,” said Lottie Lee Davis of the Be Ready CDC, which received $49,400 to provide stipends for youth who will work at neighborhood beautification and construction projects in the West Center City area of Wilmington. “The ability to change a blighted and unkempt area impacts the spirit and mindset of a community. We are teaching them to be leaders of change, one block at a time!”

The NBBF, which gave priority to smaller dollar requests, awarded grants to:

  • Latin American Community Center – $5000 for a soccer league for 20 at-risk youth age 12-16 in Hilltop area of Wilmington
  • YWCA of Delaware – $17,589 for a Summer Internship Teen Empowerment program to provide exposure for youth with a number of major employers
  • Jewish Family Services of Delaware – $20,592 for Pre-Employment Training Services for at-risk youth in Wilmington
  • FAME Inc. – $25,000 for STEM education for students in grades 3-6 during out-of-school hours in Wilmington
  • Western Family YMCA – $30,470 for after school and community events for teens in Newark
  • New Horizons Community Center – $34,500 for martial arts and work readiness for juveniles and teens in Wilmington
  • Dover YMCA – $42,275 for its Young Men Mentoring Program for 30 boys age 10-15 on healthy lifestyles and employment skills training in Dover
  • Dover Police – $43,903 for basketball, flag football and hockey programs for Dover city youth
  • Central YMCA – $43,025 for a summer activity program for 75 teens in Wilmington
  • Bear YMCA – $45,080 for summer activities for 75 at-risk teens in Route 40 area
  • Walnut Street YMCA – $45,315 for teen engagement for 200 8th and 9th graders in Wilmington
  • Delaware Nature Society – $48,394 for an environmental after-school club for 30 students
  • Be Ready Community Development Corp. – $49,400 to provide stipends to 24 youth to engage in neighborhood beautification and construction projects in West Center City Wilmington
  • Pathways of Delaware – $81,986 for its Youth Health Ambassador Program to prevent youth delinquency
  • Dover Housing Authority – $136,500 to provide exercise equipment at Simon Circle community center staffed by military and police volunteers
  • Boys and Girls Club – $250,000 for summer and after-school activities for approximately 1000 teens in 5 locations: Wilmington (2 sites), Dover, Milford and Seaford

Some of the funded youth programs will be up and running this summer and some will begin in the next school year.

Grant applications were taken in December 2016, after a series of public meetings across the statewide allowing comment on needs that could be met with the NBBF funding. A board — including representatives of the Delaware Economic Development Office, Department of Justice, Delaware State Housing Authority, Office of State Planning, and former Wilmington Mayor James Sills as a public representative — considered the applications and awarded the grants this spring.

NBBF is also in the process of making grants in the areas of neighborhood improvement, including vacant lot projects; lights and façade improvements; public safety and recidivism activities, including programs for released inmates, surveillance cameras, and safety courses; and downtown district planning activities in cities and towns throughout Delaware.


DOL Employment and Training Hudson Center Reopens

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

May 30, 2017

Newark, DE – The Delaware Department of Labor, Division of Employment and Training is reopening its operation at the Hudson State Service Center after construction work there caused it to temporarily relocate last month.

On Monday, June 19, Employment and Training services will resume at the Hudson Center office located at 501 Ogletown Road in Newark.

Anyone with questions can contact DET staffers at 302-283-7582.

ABOUT THE DELAWARE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

The Delaware Department of Labor connects people to jobs, resources, monetary benefits, workplace protections and labor market information to promote financial independence, workplace justice and a strong economy. The department is made up of four divisions:

Division of Unemployment Insurance

Division of Industrial Affairs

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

Office of Occupational and Labor Market Information

The combined efforts of these divisions and offices support the employment-related needs of nearly 400,000 Delaware workers and more than 20,000 businesses throughout the state.

CONTACT:

Leon Tucker, Director of Communications

Delaware Department of Labor

302.761.8002 office

302.530.5770 Cell

Leon.Tucker@delaware.gov

http://dol.delaware.gov/


Governor Carney Signs Legislation to Address Gender Pay Gap

Delaware will become first state to prohibit employers from requesting salary history

DOVER, Del. – Governor John Carney on Wednesday signed a new law that will prevent employers from requesting the salary history of job applicants and will help close the pay gap between men and women.

Sponsored by House Majority Leader Valerie Longhurst, the bipartisan legislation – which takes effect in December – also explicitly prohibits employers from screening applicants based on previous compensation history.

Delaware will become the first state to enact such changes into law. Massachusetts passed a similar measure last year that will take effect in January.

“All Delawareans should expect to be compensated equally for performing the same work,” said Governor Carney. “This new law will help guarantee that across our state, and address a persistent wage gap between men and women. Thank you to Representative Longhurst and members of the General Assembly of both parties for your leadership on this issue.”

Governor Carney signs HS 1 to HB 1.
Governor Carney signs HS 1 to HB 1.

“Pay inequity should not exist in the first place,” said Lieutenant Governor Bethany Hall-Long. “Unfortunately, women often have to work harder for our success and to be paid the same as our male counterparts. We still only make 78 cents for every dollar a man makes. This legislation will provide a crucial step toward equalizing wages and eliminating this gap. We owe it to the hardworking women and mothers out there today, and our young girls who will make up our future workforce, to create a level playing field for all of them.”

 

“Closing the wage gap is a major economic issue for our state and we should do everything in our power as legislators to work to even the playing field and empower the next generation of young women,” said Representative Longhurst. “Delaware is making history today, as we will be the first state to have a wage history law in effect. This new law will protect all prospective employees from having their previous jobs’ salary potentially used against them when seeking work. People should be judged and paid based on their qualifications and not have their previous salaries count against them.”

“It’s one thing to say that we need to do better for women; it’s another thing to take action,” said Senate Majority Leader Margaret Rose Henry. “HS 1 for HB 1 takes real steps to protect women in the workforce where it often matters most: the hiring table. Without wage secrecy protections, employers are free—and, in fact, have an incentive—to perpetuate substantial, long-term wage discrimination against women. We still have a long way to go, but this will make a real difference not only for women in the workforce, but for the 40 percent of households that rely on a woman as their primary wage-earner.”

“I am proud to be a sponsor of this legislation. All issues as they relate to wages and salary schedules should be gender-neutral,” said House Minority Whip Deborah Hudson. “A person’s gender should not be a factor in what we pay an individual for a particular job. This bill ensures we make that happen.”

“I believe one of my jobs in the Senate is to help create a level playing field for all people,” said Senator Cathy Cloutier. “This legislation is one step closer to true job equality for everyone.”

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DOL Employment and Training Hudson Center Operation Temporarily Relocating to Pencader

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

May 30, 2017

Newark, DE – Due to construction activity at the site, the Delaware Department of Labor, Division of Employment and Training office has temporarily closed its Hudson State Service Center and relocated the operation to the agency’s Pencader Corporate Center.

Effective June 1 and until further notice, the team from the Hudson office will be operating out of the Employment and Training facility off of DE-896 in Newark.

While no specific date for moving back to the Hudson State Service Center has been set, the move is expected to last some three weeks.

The Pencader Corporate Center address is:

225 Corporate Blvd, suite 211

Newark, DE 19702

Members of the public can continue contacting the staff from the Hudson office 302-451-3466.

ABOUT THE DELAWARE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

The Delaware Department of Labor connects people to jobs, resources, monetary benefits, workplace protections and labor market information to promote financial independence, workplace justice and a strong economy. The department is made up of four divisions:

Division of Unemployment Insurance

Division of Industrial Affairs

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

Office of Occupational and Labor Market Information

The combined efforts of these divisions and offices support the employment-related needs of nearly 400,000 Delaware workers and more than 20,000 businesses throughout the state.

CONTACT:

Leon Tucker, Director of Communications

Delaware Department of Labor

302.761.8002 office

302.530.5770 Cell

Leon.Tucker@delaware.gov

http://dol.delaware.gov/


LEGISLATIVE ADVISORY: Governor Carney Signs Bill to Reduce Dropout Rate

Legislation sponsored by Representative Matthews and Senator McDowell

WILMINGTON, Del. – Governor John Carney has signed House Bill 23, legislation aimed at reducing the dropout rate in Delaware’s public schools.

Representative Sean Matthews and Senator Harris McDowell sponsored the legislation.

“All of Delaware’s students deserve an equal opportunity to learn and succeed,” said Governor Carney. “We know that Delawareans without a high school degree are more likely to be unemployed, and more likely to earn less than those who complete their education. Students who are considering withdrawing from school, and their families, should understand those potential consequences. The changes made in this legislation would help us reach some of those students. Thank you to Representative Matthews, Senator McDowell and all members of the General Assembly for taking on this important issue.”

The new law requires that students over the age of 16 who wish to withdraw from school prior to graduation both obtain written consent from their parent or guardian, and attend an exit interview. Schools will inform those students about the potential consequences of dropping out of school, including a greater risk for unemployment and a lower earning potential. The Department of Education will provide materials for the exit interviews. Those interviews also will cover any available support services or programs that may assist the student in pursuing their education, and information about training and employment opportunities.

“Research and experience has shown that a student dropping out of high school is often a gradual process of disengagement between the student and school community. For the most part, students don’t just drop out because they reach 16 years of age and are allowed to drop out,” said Representative Matthews. “Reaching out and engaging these students and their parents before a situation becomes serious are critical to reducing and preventing students from dropping out in the first place. We must take positive steps to engage students and educate them on the significance of dropping out and the challenges it creates for them later in life.”

“Kids who graduate high school are likely to go on to lead stable, productive and in many cases extraordinary lives and we need to do all we can as a state to help them realize that potential,” said Senator McDowell. “This new law ensures that some real thought, collaboration, and analysis is a part of the life-altering decision to leave high school.”

Read Governor Carney’s full Legislative Advisory #4 to learn more about legislation recently signed into law.