Sussex Conservation District offers free workshop on stormwater pond maintenance Dec. 5 in Lewes

GEORGETOWN – Sussex County property owners who want to learn more about stormwater pond maintenance are invited to attend free workshops being offered Thursday, Dec. 5, by the Sussex Conservation District at the DNREC Lewes Conference Room located at 901 Pilottown Road, Lewes, DE 19958. The morning workshop will begin with registration at 8:30 a.m. and run until noon. An afternoon workshop will begin with registration at 1:30 p.m. and run until 5 p.m.

Stormwater ponds collect surface runoff to manage and help prevent downstream flooding, remove pollutants, and settle suspended sediments transported by stormwater. These ponds can add to the aesthetics of a community, and homeowners often pay a premium to be close to these waterfront sites.

The task of maintaining stormwater ponds falls on the property owner. In many cases, the owner is a homeowners’ association or maintenance corporation, whose responsibilities also include open space management. Some associations seek professional support, while others choose to manage them on their own. Other property owners may not even be aware that the ponds require ongoing and sometimes extensive maintenance.

The workshop will provide general information on why stormwater pond management is needed and how to ensure a pond’s proper function for years to come. Many homeowners do not reach out for technical assistance until there is a problem.

Seating is limited and pre-registration is encouraged. To register for a workshop or for more information, please contact the Sussex Conservation District at 302-856-2105, or register online at www.sussexconservation.org.

For more information about Delaware’s Sediment and Stormwater Program, which operates within DNREC’s Division of Watershed Stewardship’s Conservation Program Section, visit DNREC Sediment and Stormwater.

Contact: Jessica Watson, Sussex Conservation District, 302-856-2105, or Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902.


DNREC Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police arrest Harrington man for weapons possession by a person prohibited

DOVER – A DNREC Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police investigation ended on Nov. 17 with the arrest of a Harrington man for multiple charges of illegal possession of firearms and ammunition.

Charles M. Bright Jr.

Charles M. Bright Jr., 58, was charged with three total counts of possession, purchase, ownership, or control of a firearm or ammunition by a person prohibited. Bright was arraigned at Justice of the Peace Court 7 in Dover and released on his own recognizance, pending a future court appearance.

Upon completion of the investigation, Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police officers approached the suspect while he was deer hunting and in possession of a .50-caliber CVA muzzleloader. In addition to the muzzleloader confiscated at the scene, a Ten Point crossbow, 20-gauge Remington shotgun, and numerous rounds of shotgun ammunition were seized from Bright’s residence.

Delaware law prohibits a person from owning or possessing any type of deadly weapon whose criminal history includes prior felony convictions; misdemeanor convictions associated with violent crimes, drug convictions, or mental conditions as defined under the law; or court-issued protection from abuse orders. Deadly weapons consist of all types of firearms, as well as ammunition and any type of bow to include compound, recurve, or crossbow.

Media Contact: Sgt. Brooke Mitchell, Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police, 302-739-9913 or 302-382-7167, or Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902.

Like Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police on Facebook, www.facebook.com/pages/Delaware-Fish-Wildlife-Natural-Resources-Police.

Follow Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police on Twitter, https://twitter.com/DE_FW_NRPolice.

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DNREC’s Division of Fish & Wildlife reminds hunters that Sportsmen Against Hunger program accepts donated deer

Butcher shops and self-serve coolers available to accept donated deer to help feed those in need

DOVER – During the current peak of the 2019/2020 deer hunting season, DNREC’s Division of Fish & Wildlife reminds hunters that its Sportsmen Against Hunger program is available for hunters to donate harvested deer to help feed those in need. All donated deer are processed free of charge to the hunter, and the meat is distributed to participating charitable groups.

Donated deer can be dropped off at participating private butcher shops as well as self-serve, walk-in coolers maintained by the Division of Fish & Wildlife as listed below. Deer generously donated by deer hunters are processed into ground venison and distributed to charitable groups that provide meals for needy Delawareans.

Last year, the Sportsmen Against Hunger program distributed 19,069 pounds of venison from 639 deer donated by hunters to approximately three dozen food pantries and shelters statewide, which provided more than 76,000 meals to Delawareans in need. Since it began in 1992, the program has provided more than two million such meals.

Participating butcher shops in the Sportsmen Against Hunger program

New Castle County

Townsend Deer Butchering
1300 Dexter Corner Road
Townsend, DE 19734
302-378-3268

Kent County

D&J Custom Cutting
89 Myers Drive
Hartly, DE 19953
302-492-0323

Miller’s Butcher Shop
577 Morgans Choice Road
Wyoming, DE 19934
302-697-8278

Sussex County

Dave’s Cut ‘Em Up
6854 Delmar Road
Delmar, DE 19940
302-381-7257

Walk-in cooler locations to donate deer for Sportsmen Against Hunger program

New Castle County

Augustine Wildlife Area, 303 North Congress Street, Port Penn, DE 19731

Kent County

Little Creek Wildlife Area, 3018 Bayside Drive, Dover, DE 19901
Norman G. Wilder Wildlife Area, 782 Kersey Road, Viola, DE 19979
Mosquito Control Office, 1161 Airport Road, Milford, DE 19963

Sussex County

Redden State Forest Headquarters, 18074 Redden Forest Drive, Georgetown, DE 19947
Trap Pond State Park, 33587 Bald Cypress Lane, Laurel, DE 19956
Gumboro Community Center, 36849 Millsboro Highway, Millsboro, DE 19966
Assawoman Wildlife Area, 37604 Mulberry Landing Road, Frankford, DE 19945

Hunters donating deer at self-serve, walk-in coolers are asked to call the phone number posted on the cooler so that the deer can be transported for processing in a timely manner. Hunters are reminded that all deer dropped off at a cooler must be field-dressed and registered by the hunter, with the registration number written on the field tag attached to the deer. Coolers are checked frequently, with donated deer taken to participating private butcher shops or the Sussex Correctional Institution’s deer butchering program for processing.

All deer harvested in Delaware, including donated deer, must be registered through the Division of Fish & Wildlife’s Hunter and Trapper Registration (HTR) system. Deer hunters are encouraged to access the system online using a smartphone, tablet, laptop, or desktop computer. Hunters who prefer to talk to a live customer service representative can call 1-855-DEL-HUNT (1-855-335-4868).

More information on hunting in Delaware can be found in the 2019-2020 Delaware Hunting and Trapping Guide. The guide also is available in printed form at DNREC’s Dover licensing desk in the Richardson & Robbins Building, 89 Kings Highway, Dover, DE 19901, and from license agents statewide.

For more information on the Sportsmen Against Hunger Program, including an interactive map of the donation locations, please visit Sportsmen Against Hunger, or contact Bill Jones, regional wildlife manager, at 302-284-4795 or Eric Ness, deer biologist, at 302-735-3600.

Follow the Division of Fish & Wildlife on Facebook, https://www.facebook.com/DelawareFishWildlife.

Contact: Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902.


DNREC Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police Blotter: Nov. 4-10

(K-9 Roscoe by Officer Josh Hudson)

Reminder for the week: Most hunters must wear hunter orange during firearms deer seasons

DOVER – To achieve public compliance with laws and regulations through education and enforcement actions that help conserve Delaware’s fish and wildlife resources and ensure safe boating and public safety, DNREC’s Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police officers between Nov. 4-10 made 1,824 contacts with hunters, anglers, boaters, and the general public, issuing nine citations. Officers responded to 50 complaints regarding possible violations of laws and regulations or requests to assist the public. A Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police presence continued at the C&D Canal Conservation Area and Michael N. Castle Trail.

Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police in the Community

  • On Nov. 7 and 10, Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police officers discussed the role of Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police officers and reviewed safe hunting practices, hunting laws, and what to expect when checked by an officer in the field with attendees of a Hunter Education Class at the Little Creek Hunter Education Training Center.

Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police Actions

Citations issued by category, with the number of charges in parentheses, included:

Wildlife Conservation: Trespassing to hunt (3), and hunting deer in archery season with weapon other than a bow (1).

Fisheries Conservation: Recreational: Crab pot tampering (1).

Boating & Boating Safety: Operating a vessel with insufficient number of life jackets (1), and failure to observe slow no wake (1).

Other: Trespassing after hours on a state wildlife area (2).

DNREC’s Division of Fish & Wildlife recognizes and thanks the majority of anglers, hunters, and boaters who comply with and support Delaware’s fishing, hunting, and boating laws and regulations. The Public are encouraged to report fish, wildlife, and boating violations to the Delaware Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police by calling 302-739-4580 or through the DENRP Tip app on a smartphone, which can be downloaded free of charge by searching “DENRP Tip” via the Google Play Store or the iTunes App Store. Wildlife violations may also be reported anonymously to Operation Game Theft by calling 800-292-3030, going online to http://de.gov/ogt, or using the DENRP Tip app. Verizon customers can connect to Operation Game Theft directly by dialing #OGT.

Are you AWARE?
Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police remind hunters that, except for waterfowl hunters, wearing hunter orange is required for safety during all firearms deer seasons. Firearm deer hunters, as well as bow hunters and small game hunters, are required to wear no less than a total of 400 square inches of hunter orange on their heads, chests, and backs combined during firearms deer seasons. Deer hunters concealed inside ground-level blinds also must place 400 square inches of hunter orange within 10 feet outside of the blind and at least three feet off the ground during firearms deer seasons.

For more information on hunting in Delaware, click on 2019-2020 Delaware Hunting and Trapping Guide. Wildlife area maps with area-specific regulations are available online at Delaware Wildlife Area Maps. Printed copies of the Delaware Hunting and Trapping Guide and the wildlife area maps are also available at the licensing desk in DNREC’s Richardson & Robbins Building, 89 Kings Highway, Dover, DE 19901, or by calling the Wildlife Section office at 302-739-9912. The printed guide also is available from license agents throughout the state.

Follow Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police on Facebook, https://www.facebook.com/DEFWNRPolice/.

Follow Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police on Twitter, https://twitter.com/DE_FW_NRPolice.

Contact: Sgt. Brooke Mitchell, Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police, 302-739-9913, or 302-382-7167.


DNREC announces release of preliminary data from USGS unconfined aquifer water quality study

DOVER – The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control’s Division of Water today announced the release of preliminary data from the ongoing United States Geological Survey (USGS) unconfined aquifer water quality study in Delaware.

The USGS is in the process of completing the third in a series of ongoing studies conducted over the past 20 years. These studies focused on the ground water quality in a selection of public water systems statewide. Started in 2000, the USGS studies have been designed to assess existing raw-water quality relative to established drinking water standards and emerging interests. In each iteration, the study has included analytes beyond the standard regulatory scope with the addition of per- and poly-fluorinated substances (PFAS) in the current effort.

Consistent with the previous studies, specific compounds were detected above standards at a few locations. DNREC’s review of this preliminary data indicates that overall water quality in the State of Delaware is generally good in respect to the broad suite of compounds detected. PFAS were detected in isolated locations which shows similar distribution to other emerging compounds in the past. Of the 30 sampling locations, PFAS was identified in the unconfined aquifer water above the current Federal Health Advisory Limit (HAL) of 70 parts per trillion in only two isolated locations. In both instances, DNREC, in conjunction with the Department of Health and Social Service’s Office of Drinking Water (DHSS-ODW), and the water providers, confirmed that treated water quality meets the drinking water standards, including the unregulated compounds. While the sampling was done at locations of public wells, the USGS results reflect unconfined aquifer water prior to any treatment supplied by water utilities, and do not reflect served water quality.

While the USGS is in the process of finalizing the report, verified preliminary data can now be accessed by the public through the National Water Information System (NWIS). It is anticipated that the USGS study summarizing the results of their analysis of over 500 compounds will be completed in the spring of 2020. This data, in comparison with the results from the 2000 and 2008 studies, will provide a detailed baseline of water quality in the unconfined aquifer throughout the state that can be used by DNREC and partnering agencies in making water resource management decisions.

CONTACT: Michael Globetti or Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902

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