Public Meetings Planned This Month on Delaware EV Infrastructure, Clean Transportation Initiatives

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control and Department of Transportation will hold a series of public meetings this month on electric vehicle infrastructure and clean transportation initiatives.

 

To be Highlighted by DNREC, DelDOT Between Nov. 14 and 17

Delawareans can learn more about two key strategies – electric vehicle infrastructure and clean car regulations – the state is pursuing to reduce transportation-related emissions at virtual public meetings between Nov. 14 and 17 to be held jointly by the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) and the Delaware Department of Transportation (DelDOT).

Transportation is a leading cause of smog forming air pollutants in Delaware, including nitrogen oxides. It is also the leading contributor of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas emissions which cause climate change. Delaware’s Climate Action Plan outlines several strategies the state can use to reduce those emissions, including adoption of Advanced Clean Cars vehicle requirements, transitioning to zero emission vehicles and ensuring the state has the infrastructure in place to handle the growth in numbers of electric vehicles on the road.

“Delaware is preparing for a transition to a clean transportation future,” said DNREC Secretary Shawn M. Garvin. “More choices from manufacturers, longer range and affordability are making it easier for consumers to switch to cleaner vehicles, including electric vehicles. DelDOT and DNREC are moving forward together with parallel efforts to assure a smooth transition.”

Those parallel efforts include developing an Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Plan for the state and adopting California’s Advanced Clean Cars II Program.

Delaware’s Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Plan
Information on the state’s Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Plan will be presented at two one-hour-long sessions Nov. 14 at 5 p.m. and again at 6 p.m. The sessions are the same as those held by the two state agencies on Oct. 24, repeated this month as opportunity for anyone who missed the previous sessions. Topics to be covered are the plan’s purpose, current electric vehicle infrastructure, and how future EV infrastructure locations could be prioritized. Participants also can have their questions about EV infrastructure answered by state experts and provide feedback for the next phase of the planning process.

Visit DelDOT’s website to learn more about the Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Plan, explore information in the virtual meeting room, or to get meeting login information.

Delaware’s adoption of California’s Advanced Clean Cars II Program
DNREC’s Division of Air Quality will also host a virtual workshop on amending 7 DE Admin. Code 1140 to update the adoption of California’s Advanced Clean Car II low-emission vehicle and greenhouse gas standards and add requirements for zero emission vehicles (ZEVs) for model year 2027 and beyond. In March, Gov. John Carney directed DNREC to begin the process for adoption of the Advanced Clean Car II amendments, which include the ZEV standards. The workshop will be held on the dates and times as follow:

For more information about the adoption of California’s Advanced Clean Car II regulations, visit DNREC’s Division of Air Quality webpage.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities, and educates Delawareans about the environment. The DNREC Division of Air Quality monitors and regulates all emissions to the air. The DNREC Division of Climate, Coastal and Energy uses science, education, policy development and incentives to address Delaware’s climate, energy and coastal challenges. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Jim Lee, JamesW.Lee@delaware.gov; Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov


DNREC to Pilot Changes to Delaware Surf Fishing Permit Program for 2023

 The DNREC Division of Parks and Recreation worked with stakeholders in 2022 to find best practices to allow more anglers to drive-on surf fish at Delaware State Parks beaches while protecting the natural resource. Recommended changes to the program will be piloted in 2023.

 

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control announced today changes are to be piloted for the 2023 surf fishing permit program after record interest in the program in 2022. One of the biggest changes will be the elimination of a cap in effect since 2019 on the number of permits sold annually. The DNREC Division of Parks and Recreation will replace the cap for 2023 with a technology-based reservation system for managing capacity on summer weekends, when the state’s surf fishing beaches are in highest demand.

Last spring, the Division of Parks and Recreation initiated a comprehensive review of the program in response to unprecedented permit sales for the 2022 season –  including the opening day for sales, when the online permitting system was temporarily overwhelmed and surf fishing permits sold out in just a few hours. The historic sales volume peaked at 742 permits being issued per minute, with the sales cap of 17,000 permits reached in under four hours. DNREC’s review of the program looked nationally at best practices and other states’ models for viable solutions to improve the sales process, delivery of permits, compliance with surf fishing regulations, enforcement and public safety – all with a goal of providing access to surf fishing on state park multi-use beaches while protecting the natural resource.

“Over the last few years, we have implemented changes such as single-stack parking and increased surf fishing check points at the beach crossings, which have improved public safety and the visitor experience. Piloting the changes of dropping the cap requirement, implementing a reservation system for summer weekends, and adding an educational component was the next logical step to better manage the program for the future,” said DNREC Secretary Shawn M. Garvin.

DNREC’s surf fishing permit program review and evaluation also included gathering data and information about the existing surf fishing program from staff and permit-holders, and researching best practices to identify potential strategies. The Division of Parks and Recreation sent surveys to more than 30,000 current and previous surf fishing permit holders, and received more than 7,000 responses.

A stakeholder workgroup was formed in May to evaluate the data and provide feedback on potential solutions. The workgroup comprised members from various backgrounds including four members of the Delaware General Assembly, leadership of a homeowner’s association for a neighborhood bordering state park land, Department of Transportation, Delaware Volunteer Firefighters Association, the Delaware Parks and Recreation Advisory Council, Delaware Mobile Surf Fishermen, a bait and tackle shop owner and experts in environmental science from Delaware universities.

The recommendations were presented and endorsed by the Parks and Recreation Council in August 2022. The Council was formed in 1968 with the purpose of advising the Director of Parks and Recreation concerning matters related to the planning, acquisition, development, management, conservation, and programming of lands and services under the jurisdiction of the Division.

DNREC will implement the following recommendations for the 2023 Surf Fishing Program:

  • Remove the existing 17,000-permit sales cap.
    • “The stakeholder committee did a thorough job of evaluating potential solutions and I am pleased that the existing 17,000 sales cap is being removed,” said State Representative Ron Gray.
    • “Removal of the cap will eliminate the rush that has occurred in recent years while allowing everyone equal access to purchase a surf fishing permit over a prolonged period,” said State Senator Gerald Hocker.
  • Pilot the new surf fishing permit reservation system.
    • Reservations will be required Saturdays, Sundays and holidays starting the third weekend in May through Labor Day weekend, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Peak holidays are: Memorial Day, Juneteenth, 4th of July and Labor Day.
    • Reservations will be $4 per day and will reserve access from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
    • Reservations will not be available for Off-Peak surf tag permit holders.
    • Reservations will be for a specific beach location and can be made for one of seven different locations.
    • Reservations can be made conveniently online (desktop and mobile) or through the Division of Parks and Recreation’s call center. Reservations cannot be made in-person at the state parks or at the DNREC central office in Dover.
    • Reservations must be printed and displayed in the vehicle for enforcement verification. Mobile verification may be used as a backup.
    • Weekend reservations will be made available weekly. Reservations will be first-come, first-served and will open the same week for the coming weekend, including holidays. Reservations will be accepted starting on the same weekday throughout the peak surf fishing season. The day of the week will be announced by DNREC before the reservation system is launched in May.
    • Reservations will continue to be taken through 4 p.m. on the day-of if space allows to accommodate same-day reservations.
    • One reservation will be allowed per surf tag permit holder per day, and reservations are non-refundable and non-transferable.
    • Even after a park reaches capacity, anglers with surf fishing reservations will be allowed into the park,
    • Annual surf fishing permit holders can access the beach without a reservation on weekends and holidays after 4 p.m., but must be off the beach by 8 a.m. the next morning.
    • Anglers who previously purchased a two-year permit (2022-23) will be subject to the new reservation system. A full refund of the second year will be available to permit holders upon request no later than March 31, 2023.
    • “The reservation system will eliminate delays and access issues when state park day-use lots reach capacity by still allowing surf fishing permit reservation holders to access the drive-on beaches. It also allows someone with a reservation to leave and return later if they choose. Reservation systems are being utilized by many state and national park systems as a means to manage overcrowding or capacity concerns,” said Joseph Smack, chair of the state’s Parks and Recreation Council.
  • Require viewing an instructional surf fishing video for permit holders.
    • Anyone purchasing a surf fishing permit will be required to acknowledge they have watched an instructional video with beach driving tips, including requisite understanding of airing down vehicle tires, in-vehicle mandatory equipment, and safety requirements for surf fishing on state park beaches.

The surf fishing permit fee remains unchanged for 2023 and sales are anticipated to start in December.

For more information, including answers to frequently asked questions, visit www.destateparks.com/SurfTagSales.

About DNREC

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. The DNREC Division of Parks and Recreation oversees more than 26,000 acres in 17 state parks and the Brandywine Zoo. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Shauna McVey, shauna.mcvey@delaware.gov; Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov

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Delaware Authorities Caution Drivers to Watch Out for Deer During Mating Season

Onset of peak deer activity in Delaware during mating season calls for vigilance by drivers at dawn, dusk and overnight. /DNREC photo

 

Extra Vigilance on Roads Called for as Days Shorten and Deer Become More Active Morning and Evening

Use extra caution on the roads during the deer mating season is the warning to Delaware drivers from the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, the Office of Highway Safety (OHS) within the Department of Safety and Homeland Security and Delaware State Police (DSP). Late October through November is the peak period for deer-related crashes, as that’s when white-tailed deer males (bucks) are in their annual pursuit of females (does) in the First State. That pursuit leads to more deer crossing roadways in the shorter days ahead – especially after the Nov. 6 change from daylight saving time back to Eastern Standard Time.

White-tailed deer breed only once a year. The mating season, which carries on from late October sometimes into mid-December, and peaks from Nov. 11 to 20, is referred to as the rut. “During this timeframe, deer activity increases substantially as bucks search for mates,” said DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Program Manager Joe Rogerson. “If a buck’s pursuit of a doe takes them across a roadway, it doesn’t matter if it’s a rural road or Route 1, a collision with a vehicle could occur. Delaware drivers need to pay particular attention while behind the wheel this time of year, especially when driving on roads bordered by woods or agricultural fields, since that’s where deer are more apt to run out onto the roadway.”

With the end of daylight saving time, more motorists will be traveling to and from work and school around dawn and dusk, when deer are typically most active. According to the latest Delaware Office of Highway Safety data, deer-vehicle collisions occur most often between 5 and 7 a.m. and spike again from 5 to 10 p.m. – which includes the timeframe when many people are heading home for the evening. “With shorter daylight hours during the fall, we see an increase in deer along our roadways,” said Kimberly Chesser, Office of Highway Safety director. “We remind drivers to be alert, pay attention to the road and surroundings, and be more cautious during these times. Slow down and watch for deer crossing signs that indicate areas where deer are known to cross the road. Never drive impaired and always buckle up, every trip, every time.”

The average white-tailed deer in Delaware weighs about 140 pounds, with larger bucks going 200 pounds or more, according to the DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife. Hitting an animal that size may cause injury to drivers or passengers, or trigger an accident involving other motorists – besides doing costly damage to vehicles involved in such a collision.

In 2021, 1,849 or 95% of the 1,945 vehicle-animal collisions investigated by Delaware State Police involved deer. Of that number, 821 collisions with deer occurred in October, November and December, the months spanned by the deer mating season in Delaware, when drivers are warned to be most attentive. “Deer collisions typically increase during this time of the year, so it is essential for drivers to remain vigilant,” said Sergeant India Sturgis, DSP director of public information. “Although deer are more active at dawn and dusk, they are also active during broad daylight. Wearing your seatbelt, reducing your speed, and driving alert may not prevent all deer-related collisions, but can certainly reduce injuries and vehicle damage if you are involved in a collision.”

Based on reported insurance claims from July 1, 2021 to June 20, 2022, State Farm Insurance ranked Delaware 32nd nationally with drivers having a 1-in-122 chance of being involved in an animal collision, with deer accounting for the majority of animal-related crashes and vehicle damage claims. To avoid a large out-of-pocket expense, AAA Mid-Atlantic, which provides coverage for Delaware motorists, recommends purchasing a policy that includes comprehensive coverage for collisions with deer or other animals. AAA Mid-Atlantic also notes the average claim submitted for a deer strike is more than $5,000.

DNREC, OHS, DSP and other police agencies and auto insurance companies all agree: the best way to prevent or lessen the severity of deer collisions is attentive driving, which includes avoiding distractions that can take a driver’s eyes off the road, such as mobile phones, adjusting the radio, eating while driving, or passenger activities.

Additional safety tips include:

  • Always wear your seatbelt to reduce your risk of injury in a collision.
  • Reduce speed at night, on curves and in bad weather.
  • Switch to high beams when there is no oncoming traffic to better reflect the eyes of deer on or near the roadway and scan the sides of the road as well as what’s directly ahead.
  • Watch for “Deer Crossing” signs marking commonly-traveled areas by deer on the road ahead. Slow down immediately and proceed with caution until past the crossing point.
  • Be aware deer usually travel in groups, so if you see one deer, there are likely to be others.
  • Slow down and blow your horn with one long blast to frighten deer away. Do not depend on devices such as deer whistles, deer fences and reflectors to deter deer, as these devices have not been proven to reduce deer-vehicle collisions.
  • Do not swerve to miss a deer – brake and stay in your lane. Losing control of your vehicle, crossing into another lane, hitting an oncoming vehicle, or leaving the roadway and striking a tree or utility pole will likely result in a much more serious outcome than hitting a deer.
  • If you hit a deer, and your vehicle is damaged, stop at the scene, get your car off the road if possible, turn on your vehicle hazard lights – and if you or anyone in your vehicle are injured, call 911.
  • Do not touch the animal or get too close; injured deer may bite or kick and are capable of causing serious injury.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. The DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife conserves and manages Delaware’s fish and wildlife and their habitats, and provides fishing, hunting, wildlife viewing and boating access on nearly 65,000 acres of public land. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, InstagramTwitter or LinkedIn.

About Delaware Office of Highway Safety
The Office of Highway Safety (OHS) is committed to improving the safety of Delaware’s motoring public by focusing on behavioral traffic safety issues such as impaired driving, seat belt use, speeding, child passenger safety, pedestrian and bicycle safety, motorcycle safety, and teen driving issues. FAQs can be answered at ArriveAliveDE.com. You can follow the Delaware Office of Highway Safety by visiting us at: ArriveAliveDE.com, OHS, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, Snapchat, and YouTube.

Media Contacts:
DNREC: Joanna Wilson, joanna.wilson@delaware.gov, Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov
OHS: Jason Coleman, jason.coleman@delaware.gov
DSP: Sergeant India Sturgis, india.sturgis@delaware.gov; Senior Corporal Jason Hatchell, jason.hatchell@delaware.gov;

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More Delaware Hunting Seasons to Open in November, Including Firearm/Shotgun Deer, Waterfowl and Small Game

A number of Delaware hunting seasons – including “shotgun deer season” – are to open in November, with waterfowl and small game also prominent among next month’s sporting seasons /Photo: USFWS

 

Youth and Non-ambulatory Deer Hunt Set for Nov. 5 and 6; All Deer Hunters Encouraged to Harvest Does to Help Manage Deer Herd

 

Additional Delaware hunting seasons are set to open in November, the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control announced today – including the popular November general firearm deer season, also known as “November shotgun season,” which opens Nov. 11 and extends through Nov. 20, as well as the special deer hunt open to only youth and non-ambulatory hunters on Saturday, Nov. 5 and Sunday, Nov. 6. Duck, Canada goose and other hunting seasons are to open later in the month.

Deer hunters are encouraged to harvest does (female deer) during deer hunting seasons to help manage the size and quality of Delaware’s deer population. Deer hunting is allowed on all Sundays through Jan. 31, 2023, using only those hunting methods legal for the respective established deer hunting seasons, with additional information available at de.gov/sundayhunt. All harvested deer must be registered within 24 hours of harvest online at de.gov/digitaldnrec or by calling toll-free 855-DEL-HUNT (855-335-4868).

Successful deer hunters who wish to donate venison to those in need are encouraged to participate in the Delaware Hunters Against Hunger Program. Field-dressed deer may be donated at participating butchers or self-serve, walk-in coolers maintained by the DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife, with additional information and participating butcher and cooler locations found online at de.gov/DHAH. All donated deer will be processed free of charge to the hunter, and the meat will be distributed to participating charitable organizations. Last year, hunters donated over 24,000 pounds of processed venison that provided more than 97,000 meals to Delawareans in need.

Sea duck hunters are advised that there is no longer a special sea duck zone with its own separate season dates or daily bag and possession limits. Season dates for sea ducks are now the same as the regular duck season, and the daily bag and possession limits for sea ducks are now included as part of the regular daily bag and possession limits for all ducks. Refer to page 34 of the 2022/2023 Delaware Hunting and Trapping Guide found at de.gov/hunting for additional information about hunting sea ducks.

Hunting season dates for seasons opening in November:

  • Raccoon and opossum (hunt only): Nov. 1 through Feb. 28, 2023*
  • Red fox (hunt only): Nov. 1 through Feb. 28, 2023
  • Deer youth/non-ambulatory hunt: Nov. 5 and 6
  • Deer general firearm/shotgun: Nov. 11 through 20, including all Sundays
  • Tundra swan (by special permit ONLY): Nov. 11 through Jan. 31, 2023
  • Woodcock (first season split): Nov. 21 through 26
  • Ducks (including sea ducks), coots and mergansers (second season split): Nov. 21 through 26
  • Brant (first season split): Nov. 21 through 26
  • Bobwhite quail: Nov. 21 through Jan. 7, 2023
  • Mourning dove (second season split): Nov. 21 through Jan. 31, 2023
  • Ring-necked pheasant (male only): Nov. 21 through Feb. 4, 2023
  • Cottontail rabbit: Nov. 21 through Feb. 28, 2023
  • Canada goose (first season split): Nov. 23 through 26

*Raccoon and opossum hunting seasons are closed during the November youth/non-ambulatory deer hunt and the November general firearm/shotgun deer season. Special hunting hours for raccoon and opossum during the December antlerless, January handgun/straight-walled pistol-caliber rifle, January general firearm/shotgun and January muzzleloader deer seasons are 7 p.m. until midnight (reference the 2022/2023 Delaware Hunting and Trapping Guide at de.gov/hunting for deer season dates).

Continuing Delaware hunting seasons include:

  • Moorhen, gallinule, sora, Virginia rail, king rail and clapper rail: through Nov. 23
  • Common snipe: through Nov. 26
  • Deer archery and crossbow: through Jan. 31, 2023, including all Sundays
  • Snow goose: through Jan. 31, 2023; Feb. 4, 2023
  • Gray squirrel: through Feb. 4, 2023 (closed during November general firearm/shotgun deer season)
  • Coyote (hunting): through Feb. 28, 2023
  • Crows: through March 25, 2023, June 22 through 24, 2023 and June 29 through 30, 2023 (Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays only)
  • Groundhog: through June 30, 2023

The DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife offers many hunting opportunities on state wildlife areas. Wildlife area maps and rules are available at de.gov/wamaps, with information specific to Sunday deer hunting on state wildlife areas available at de.gov/sundayhunt.

A Delaware hunting license or License Exempt Number (LEN) is required to hunt, and most waterfowl hunters are required to purchase a Delaware waterfowl (duck) stamp and a Federal Duck Stamp. Dove, goose and duck hunters also need a Federal Harvest Information Program (HIP) number, which can be obtained online at de.gov/digitaldnrec or by calling toll free 855-DEL-HUNT (855-335-4868). When using the online DNREC permitting system, hunters should either create a profile or use the “Quick Hunting Registration” option.

Registered motor vehicles used to access designated wildlife areas owned or managed by the Division of Fish and Wildlife are required to have and display a Conservation Access Pass (CAP). Hunters can opt to receive one free annual CAP with the purchase of any Delaware hunting license. To obtain a CAP, hunters will need the registration card for the vehicle to which the pass will be assigned, except for the Resident Senior Lifetime Conservation Access Pass available to Delaware residents aged 65 or older.

Delaware hunting licenses, Delaware waterfowl stamps and Conservation Access Passes can be purchased online at de.gov/digitaldnrec, at the license desk in DNREC’s Dover office at 89 Kings Highway, Dover, DE 19901 or from hunting license agents statewide. Hunters obtaining a LEN are reminded that they should create a profile using the de.gov/digitaldnrec portal or obtain a LEN at a hunting license agent if they have not already done so. Federal Duck Stamps are available for purchase at U.S. Post Offices, Bombay Hook and Prime Hook national wildlife refuges and online at 2022/2023 Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp.

More information on hunting seasons and wildlife areas is available in the 2022/2023 Delaware Hunting and Trapping Guide at de.gov/hunting. More information on hunting licenses, the state waterfowl stamp and the Conservation Access Pass is available at de.gov/huntinglicense.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities, and educates Delawareans about the environment. The DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife conserves and manages Delaware’s fish and wildlife and their habitats, and provides fishing, hunting, wildlife viewing and boating access on nearly 68,000 acres of public land. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contact: Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov

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Reminder: DNREC to Hold Public Hearing Oct. 26 on Proposed Biogas Facility in Southern Delaware

Public Comment to be Accepted Before, During and After Hearing on Bioenergy Devco’s Expansion Plans for Existing Composting Operation

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control will hold a virtual public hearing Wednesday, Oct. 26 at 6 p.m. on the proposed expansion by Bioenergy Devco (BDC) of its existing composting facility in Seaford, Del. to transform organic waste into renewable energy. The proposed project will require multiple permits from DNREC, spanning several of the Department’s divisions, including Air Quality, Waste and Hazardous Substances, and Water. Detailed information about the project and additional related resources – including English, Spanish and Haitian Creole versions of both the DNREC public notice about the hearing and the presentation made at a DNREC virtual community workshop held Sept. 28 – can be found at de.gov/biodevco.

The public hearing will allow attendees who have pre-registered with DNREC to offer comments on Bioenergy Devco’s permit applications to be entered into the public record. All public comments made directly to DNREC – whether received verbally at the public hearing or in writing before or after the hearing – have the same weight and will be considered equally by the DNREC Secretary in making a decision on whether to grant the permits that BDC would require for proceeding with its expansion plans. It is not necessary to submit comments elsewhere – and only comments made to DNREC and entered into the public record will be considered by the Department as part of the permit decision process. Closed captioning, in languages including English and Spanish, is available as an option for comments from the community. Registration and connection information for the hearing can be found on DNREC’s Bioenergy Devco public hearing webpage.

BDC’s facility is currently permitted by DNREC to accept organic waste from approved poultry industry sources for composting. The proposed facility expansion would give BDC the capacity for receiving and processing up to 250,000 tons per year of permitted organic waste. In addition to the proposed anaerobic digestion system, the expansion plans also include construction of a wastewater pre-treatment system and a biogas upgrading plant. There is also a proposed emergency generator in the expansion plans.

Byproducts from the process would include pipeline-grade renewable natural gas (RNG) and digestate, which would be dewatered and is proposed for use in the adjacent compost facility – or to be marketed in the future as a soil amendment that can be turned into compost (and which would require a distribution and marketing permit that is not part of the current proposed project and permit applications).

Specifically, the DNREC permits BDC has applied for include:

  • A resource recovery facility permit from the DNREC Division of Waste and Hazardous Substances to construct an anaerobic digestion system, biogas upgrading plant, and compost facility, designed to process poultry industry wastes into digestate, pipeline-grade renewable natural gas (RNG), and compost. Wastes the facility will accept include poultry litter, hatchery waste, dissolved air flotation (DAF) solid cake and liquid sludge, offal, waste activated sludge, and fats, oils, and greases.
  • Two 1102 Natural Minor air pollution permits from the DNREC Division of Air Quality to construct a natural gas-fired emergency generator with a standby power rating of 1,082 kilowatts (kW) (1,451 horsepower) and four anaerobic digesters with associated biogas upgrade and air pollution control equipment. The engine used in the proposed generator set is certified to comply with, and will be required to adhere to, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations.
  • Two wastewater facility construction permits from the DNREC Division of Water to construct an anaerobic digestion system and a wastewater pre-treatment system as part of the proposed resource recovery facility that processes poultry industry wastes into digestate, pipeline-grade renewable natural gas and compost. The anaerobic digestion system and wastewater pretreatment system will include three 0.208-million-gallon (MG) pretreatment tanks, and four 1.95 MG fermentation tanks, a Membrane Bioreactor System (MBR), a 0.198 MG anoxic tank, a 0.412 MG aerobic reactor, a 0.198 MG ultrafiltration feeding tank and ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis treatment systems. The treated wastewater will be pumped and hauled to the Seaford wastewater treatment and disposal facility. BDC plans for a future construction phase will eliminate the need to transport the wastewater via truck by constructing a sanitary sewer pump station and force main that will connect to a future city of Seaford force main located in front of the BDC biogas site on Seaford Road.

BDC’s permit applications and supporting materials can be found in detail on the DNREC website, de.gov/biodevco.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities, and educates Delawareans about the environment. The DNREC Division of Air Quality monitors and regulates all emissions to the air. The DNREC Division of Waste and Hazardous Substances ensures Delaware’s wastes are managed to protect human life, health, safety and the environment. The DNREC Division of Water manages and protects Delaware’s water resources. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contact: Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov

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