The Mezzanine Gallery to Exhibit “Making the Invisible, Visible” by Maia Palmer

On view from November 4-25, 2022

 

Wilmington, Del. (November 3, 2022) – The Delaware Division of the Arts’ Mezzanine Gallery presents 2022 DDOA Individual Artist Fellow Maia Palmer’s exhibition, “Making the Invisible, Visible”, running November 4-25, 2022. Guests are invited to attend a Meet-the-Artist Reception on Friday, November 4, from 5:00-7:00 p.m. (There will be student performance at 5pm from the strings majors at Cab Calloway School of the Arts, with special thanks to educator Julie Murphy).

Maia Palmer was born in Wilmington, Delaware in 1980. She works primarily in acrylics and charcoal, and has also created community murals, digital works, and figurative sculptures. Palmer earned a BFA from Carnegie Mellon University and an MFA from Washington University in St. Louis. She has exhibited nationally as well as internationally in Spain, Germany, and China. Palmer has lived all around the globe and is interested in capturing the unique spirit of each location that she experiences. To read more about Maia and her history, click here for a link to her fellowship page.

Committed to “being a positive force for social change,” Palmer is the high school visual arts teacher at Cab Calloway School of the Arts. She feels strongly about teaching there, saying “I am a product of public school and I want to be part of rebuilding its strength.” One of the most exciting aspects of receiving the Fellowship is “the recognition of my work” and the ability to further its scope and her goal to “help amplify the voices of those who are not always heard.”

 

 

Making the Invisible, Visible features a series of migraine self-portraits documenting Palmer’s experiences as a migraineur over the past 15 years. To be clear, migraine is a neurological disease, one that is debilitating and painfully real. Yet it is frequently referred to as an “invisible illness,” as there are often no visible symptoms. Women in particular are subject to dismissive treatment because of this, as Palmer has experienced first-hand.

With these works, Palmer examines her relationship with migraine. She merges autobiographical experiences with imagery and text laden with both historical and personal value. Each of these images captures a real, private moment that she has in fact experienced – from hiding under blankets to wearing hand-made ‘migraine boxes’. She says, “Creating these drawings is a visceral process of acknowledging the larger than life physical and emotional pain that migraine has caused in my life – as well as the emotional and physical growth it has helped me accomplish. I am ultimately a stronger person as I emerge on the other side of chronic migraine, cherishing every moment and delighting in our capacity as humans to overcome and endure.”

Navigating her own experiences, Palmer has embodied the physical and mental trauma of this illness by manipulating surfaces and materials to simulate the experience of a migraine – the tearing of paper, or the piercing of a surface with needle and thread. By making visible the invisible trauma of migraine, she aims to bring awareness to this consistently under-funded, chronically misunderstood disease.

The Mezzanine Gallery, open weekdays from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., is located on the second floor of the Carvel State Office Building, 820 N. French Street, Wilmington.

Image: “Splitting Headache,” 2021, charcoal on paper, 50″ x 38″

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Contact: Andrew Truscott, Program Officer, Marketing and Communications

302-577-8280, andrew.truscott@delaware.gov

The Delaware Division of the Arts, a branch of the Delaware Department of State, is dedicated to cultivating and supporting the arts to enhance the quality of life for all Delawareans. Together with its advisory body, the Delaware State Arts Council, the Division administers grants and programs that support arts programming, educate the public, increase awareness of the arts, and integrate the arts into all facets of Delaware life. For more information about the Delaware Division of the Arts, visit arts.delaware.gov or call 302-577-8278.


The Mezzanine Gallery to Exhibit “Polymer Paintings” by Joseph Barbaccia

On view from October 7-28, 2022

Wilmington, Del. (October 3, 2022) – The Delaware Division of the Arts’ Mezzanine Gallery presents 2022 DDOA Individual Artist Fellow Joseph Barbaccia’s exhibition, Polymer Paintings, running October 7-28, 2022. Guests are invited to attend a Meet-the-Artist Reception on Friday, October 7, from 5:00-7:00 p.m.

All his life, Joseph Barbaccia has been inspired by color and form. He was drawn to their motivating force even before his artistic inclinations and aspirations were clear to him. There were no artists among his extended family or their friends, but “at church on Sundays, I remember always wanting to sit in a pew the had a stained-glass window at the end in order to enjoy the colors close up,” as he studied the statues and the bas-reliefs on the walls.

Barbaccia was born in Philadelphia, but when he was a toddler, the family moved to rural New Jersey. He began drawing in earnest when he was six, at first to capture the attention of his second-grade teacher, whom he admired. But soon his family began to take notice. “Since then, except for six months in 1979 when I took a motorcycle trip [out west], I never stopped making images.” After taking classes at Philadelphia’s Tyler School of Fine Arts, Barbaccia traveled through the United States and the South Pacific, drawing and painting in a “mostly representational style.” In 1996 he settled in Potomac Falls, Virginia, where over the next two decades his experiments with encaustics, freestanding sculpture, and mixed media gained increasing attention and recognition.

The prolific artist has exhibited widely – over 35 group shows and 10 solo exhibitions – in galleries and major venues throughout the East Coast and the mid-Atlantic, including the Greater Reston Art Center, Delaware Contemporary, Rehoboth Art League, and Washington’s Corcoran Gallery. He’s been the subject of dozens of articles and reviews, both as an artist and as an illustrator with three published children’s picture books (and a fourth underway).

Barbaccia had always had a large studio, but in 2018 he and his wife (also an artist) moved to Georgetown, Delaware, where his workspace was smaller. Realizing “I would have to change my materials and methods to accommodate the new reality,” he landed on polymer clay as “the perfect choice.” The material – with its transparency and a full color spectrum – allows him to create in both two and three dimensions. It led Barbaccia in a new direction. “Approximately 90% of the artists creating with polymer clay create jewelry. I thought the time was right to expand its visual range.”

As well as inspiring Barbaccia, working with polymer clay has challenges. Using atypical art materials, “I sometimes come up against limiting parameters in applications to shows or competitions . . . [including] a list of accepted materials that doesn’t include polymer clay.” And the pandemic has led to a scarcity of his chosen material. But he continues to push against these and other constraints and revels in “showing and sharing my work.”

The Mezzanine Gallery, open weekdays from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., is located on the second floor of the Carvel State Office Building, 820 N. French Street, Wilmington.

Image: “Avatar,” 2021, polymer clay, 20 x 14 x .1 inches

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Contact: Andrew Truscott, Program Officer, Marketing and Communications

302-577-8280, andrew.truscott@delaware.gov

The Delaware Division of the Arts, a branch of the Delaware Department of State, is dedicated to cultivating and supporting the arts to enhance the quality of life for all Delawareans. Together with its advisory body, the Delaware State Arts Council, the Division administers grants and programs that support arts programming, educate the public, increase awareness of the arts, and integrate the arts into all facets of Delaware life. For more information about the Delaware Division of the Arts, visit arts.delaware.gov or call 302-577-8278.


Governor Carney, Keep Delaware Beautiful, Delaware Department of Transportation Launch Litter Free School Zone Program

CAMDEN WYOMING, Del. – Governor Carney on Thursday launched a new program encouraging students to keep their communities litter free. The program – “Litter Free School Zones” – was launched in coordination with Keep Delaware Beautiful and the Delaware Department of Transportation (DelDOT). This was launched in coordination with the “Keep DE Litter Free” initiative.

The Litter Free School Zone program is designed to encourage students to keep their school grounds litter-free and to raise public awareness regarding litter. Every school in the state is encouraged to join the movement to keep Delaware litter free.

“The Litter Free School Zone program asks children to ‘think globally and act locally,’ something that stuck with me from when I was younger,” said Governor Carney. “We know that children are the conduit to change and that we can help create positive lasting habits in our youth that will carry over past their time at school and into their communities. Picking up litter makes an immediate and noticeable difference. It connects us to each other and makes us feel part of something bigger.”

“Children play an important role in Keeping DE Litter Free. This program will continue to instill pride in our schools. As stewards of their school campuses, our students’ commitment to be litter free spills over to the community and neighborhoods,” said Dr. Christine Alois, Superintendent of the Caesar Rodney School District.

In order to become a Litter Free School Zone, each school is asked to conduct two litter clean ups as a campus. Students are also asked to track the types of litter collected to help determine future messaging about litter. At the culmination of the two campus wide litter clean ups DelDOT will provide a post and sign designating the school as a Litter Free School Zone. Students, clubs, and classes can participate in the Litter Free School Zone program.

“Keeping schools litter-free is an easy and fun way for students to work together, learning valuable community leadership and responsibility skills while gaining a respect for the environment and the world around them,” said Michael Parkowski, Chairman of the Board of Keep DE Beautiful.

Schools can sign up for the program  on Keep Delaware Beautiful’s website.

Visit the Governor’s website to view the Litter Free School Zones event.

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DNREC Sinks Floating Casino Turned Commercial Scallop Vessel ‘Texas Star’ onto Delaware’s Artificial Reef System

The Texas Star was sunk on Redbird Reef in the Atlantic Ocean on June 29. DNREC photo.

 

The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control continued to broaden the recreational appeal of Delaware’s renowned artificial reef system by sinking the Texas Star, originally outfitted as a floating casino, at a reef site 16.5 miles offshore of the Delaware coast, with readings of 38.40.494/74.43.868 at a depth of 86 feet. Built in 1977 on a multi-purpose supply ship hull, the Texas Star was last at sea as a commercial scallop catcher/processor vessel, finding its third life at approximately 4:20 p.m. EDT Wednesday, June 29 as ocean floor fish habitat planned by DNREC’s artificial reef program.

the 180-foot long Texas Star
The 180-foot long Texas Star. DNREC photo

The sinking of the 180-foot long Texas Star – as can be seen on the DNREC YouTube Channel – marked the reef program’s third deployment of a vessel in the last three years. The retired menhaden ship John S. Dempster Jr. was sunk on the Del-Jersey-Land Reef 26 miles off Indian River Inlet in early 2021, while a former Navy and later Army freighter and supply ship renamed Reedville when it too became a menhaden ship, was sunk onto Reef Site No. 11, known as Redbird Reef, in August 2020. All of them went down after the nationally-publicized 2018 sinking of the retired Lewes-Cape May, N.J. ferry Twin Capes onto the Del-Jersey-Land Reef, second only to Reef Site No. 11 as a popular recreational fishing destination.

“With today’s sinking of the Texas Star on Redbird Reef, one of 14 separate reef sites in the Delaware Bay and along the Atlantic Coast, we continue to enhance and expand the recreational fishing and diving experience in Delaware,” said DNREC Secretary Shawn M. Garvin. “When we sank Twin Capes four years ago as a centerpiece of Delaware’s artificial reef system, it was unmatched, providing fish habitat and a spectacular dive with its five decks for underwater exploration. Now anglers, the fish they are pursuing, and divers all will have another new destination.”

The Texas Star’s sinking was carried out by Norfolk, Va.-based marine contractor Coleen Marine, which has handled numerous reef deployments over the DNREC reef program’s existence at many of Delaware’s 14 permitted artificial reef sites. As with all the ships that DNREC sent down earlier, Texas Star was sunk only after receiving approvals from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Coast Guard for environmental cleanliness and safety. The DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife, which oversees the reef program, invested $325,000 in federal Sport Fish Restoration funds to buy the Texas Star from Coleen Marine after the ship settled onto the Redbird Reef.

As the newest addition to Delaware’s artificial reef program, the Texas Star joins the Dempster, the Reedville, Shearwater, Gregory S. Poole and Atlantic Mist as former commercial fishing ships now residing on Delaware artificial reef sites. Shearwater, Poole and Atlantic Mist, which also saw service as military vessels, are all part of the Del-Jersey-Land Reef, so called because it is roughly equidistant from ports of departure in each of the three states the reef’s name entails.

The Reedville was the first fishing vessel to be placed on Redbird Reef, so known because much of its structure consists of 714 retired New York City “Redbird” subway cars. Covering 1.3 square miles of ocean floor, other Redbird Reef structures include a 215-foot-long Chesapeake Bay cruise ship, 86 tanks and armored vehicles, eight tugboats, a fishing trawler and two barges.

Also residing on Delaware’s artificial reefs is the longest ship ever reefed on the East Coast, the 585-foot destroyer ex-USS Arthur W. Radford, which was sunk in 2011 on Del-Jersey-Land Reef. The reefs are also home to more than 1,350 retired New York City subway cars that have helped comprise the reef system over the last two decades, including the site where Texas Star was sunk.

More information about Delaware’s artificial reef program can be found at de.gov/artificialreefs.


About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities, and educates Delawareans about the environment. The DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife conserves and manages Delaware’s fish and wildlife and their habitats, and provides fishing, hunting, wildlife viewing and boating access on nearly 68,000 acres of public land. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Nikki Lavoie, nikki.lavoie@delaware.gov; Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov

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Delaware’s Plastic Carryout Bag Ban July 1, 2022

In 2019, the Delaware General Assembly passed a law banning plastic carryout bags (82 Del. Laws c. 166) to help reduce beach and roadside litter, increase recycling efforts, and reduce the impact of plastic bags at regional recycling facilities that manage material from Delaware’s Universal Recycling program.

In 2021, the Delaware General Assembly updated that law expanding both the bags banned and the stores impacted by the law (83 Del. Laws c. 216).

Starting July 1, 2022, retail stores in Delaware will no longer provide plastic bags at checkout. The law reduces waste and limits the number of plastic bags that litter our roads and waterways. Choose a reusable bag, or bring your own, wherever you shop.

 

 

For more information visit https://dnrec.alpha.delaware.gov/waste-hazardous/recycling/plastic-bags/