Block House Pond Delaware Historical Marker Unveiling

More than fifty-five friends, dignitaries and guests gathered in Lewes, Delaware on Wednesday, October 20, 2021 to celebrate the unveiling of the Delaware Public Archives’ newest marker that commemorates the Block House Pond.

Block House Pond, a natural spring-fed pond was named for a nearby blockhouse that was built to protect Lewes in the 1670s. Additionally, Block House Pond is where town residents sought shelter during the Bombardment of Lewes in 1813. The original pond was drained by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in 1934 but was restored by the City of Lewes in 1976 which led to the creation of the Block House Pond Park. In 2003, the park was renamed in honor of former five-term City of Lewes Mayor, George H.P. Smith.

The marker was unveiled at a ceremony that included remarks from George Cole, President, Friends of the George H.P. Smith Park; Janet Reeves, Parks & Marina Administrator, City of Lewes; The Honorable Theodore Becker, Mayor, City of Lewes; The Honorable Stephen Smyk, Delaware House of Representatives; and Stephen Marz, Director & State Archivist, Delaware Public Archives. Block House Pond Delaware Historical Marker was sponsored by Representative Smyk.

 

Photo from 10/20/2021, at the Black House Pond Dedication. Pictured from Left to Right: Stephen Marz, Director & State Archivist, Delaware Public Archives; The Honorable Theodore “Ted” Becker, Mayor, City of Lewes; The Honorable Stephen Smyk, Delaware House of Representatives and Mr. George Cole, President of the Friends of George H.P. Smith Park and the new Delaware Historical Marker for Block House Pond

 


Piping Plovers Experience Poor Nest Productivity Year in Delaware

A banded piping plover male photographed in mid-July at Cape Henlopen State Park on Delaware’s Atlantic coast/DNREC photo.

 

DNREC Provides Updates on Other Beach-Nesting Bird Species

Beach-nesting piping plovers experienced poor nest productivity on their breeding grounds in Delaware during 2021, the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control announced today in summarizing the rare shorebird species’ nesting success within the state.

Six pairs of piping plovers were recorded nesting at The Point at Cape Henlopen State Park with 18 more nesting pairs at Fowler Beach on Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, making for a modern-day record total of 24 breeding pairs. Despite the record number of breeding pairs, piping plovers were less successful in producing only 19 fledglings, young birds that hatched and can fly in leaving their nest. Poor fledgling productivity is suspected to be the result of nest loss from a Memorial Day storm and higher-than-average predation at Fowler Beach.

Record piping plover productivity was documented in Delaware over the previous three years for the federally-listed threatened species and Delaware state-listed endangered species. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service established a goal of 1.5 fledglings per breeding pair in 1996 as part of the piping plover recovery plan, with Delaware’s nesting productivity exceeding that goal from 2018 to 2020. This year, the DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife recorded 19 fledglings, for a productivity rate of 0.8 fledglings per breeding pair. In 2020, 21 breeding pairs were documented, producing 47 fledglings for a productivity rate of 2.2 fledglings/pair.

Delaware’s piping plover recovery effort involves partnerships between DNREC’s Division of Fish and Wildlife and Division of Parks and Recreation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Wildlife Services.

In other beach-nesting bird species nesting season updates, two pairs of American oystercatchers nested at The Point at Cape Henlopen State Park while one pair nested at Delaware Seashore State Park. Although the nest successfully hatched at Delaware Seashore State Park, the chicks did not fledge. A pair of American oystercatchers were observed using the marsh islands of Delaware Seashore State Park and were seen with two chicks that appear to have successfully fledged. Least tern counts were lower than recent years, with only four breeding pairs and four nests found at Cape Henlopen State Park, where only two chicks hatched, and neither of them fledged.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities, and educates Delawareans about the environment. The DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife conserves and manages Delaware’s fish and wildlife and their habitats, and provides fishing, hunting, wildlife viewing and boating access on nearly 68,000 acres of public land. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov, or Nikki Lavoie, nikki.lavoie@delaware.gov

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Division for the Visually Impaired Celebrates White Cane Safety Day

NEW CASTLE (October 19, 2021) – More than 40 participants joined the Division for the Visually Impaired (DVI) in a celebration of White Cane Safety Day on Oct. 8 for a fun walk along the Wilmington Riverfront and the Jack A. Markell Trail.

Each year, White Cane Safety Day is celebrated on Oct. 15. The white cane symbolizes the ability to achieve a full and independent life and the capacity to work productively in competitive employment; move freely and safely from place to place; and make it possible for individuals who are blind or visually impaired to fully participate in and contribute to our society.

DVI students, families, and friends were invited to walk for exercise, gather with friends, and celebrate White Cane Safety Day. A proclamation from Governor John Carney and Lt. Governor Bethany Hall-Long was given in recognition of White Cane Safety Day.

In addition, the New Castle County Mounted Police showed their support. DelDOT, Delaware Association for Blind Athletes (DABA) and BlindSight were also there to show their support of DVI.

“White Cane Safety Day is about promoting and celebrating inclusion for Delawareans who are blind and visually impaired,” said Deborah Talley, Director of the Division for the Visually Impaired, one of 10 divisions in the Department of Health and Social Services. “I am grateful to the Orientation and Mobility Team, who helped supervise this event at the Wilmington Riverfront, and especially to Heather Dougherty, who coordinated the event, and for all of the community partners who participated.”

The Division for the Visually Impaired provides educational, vocational, and technical support to empower and foster independence for Delawareans with visual impairments. To learn more, visit DVI’s website.

 

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The Department of Health and Social Services is committed to improving the quality of life of Delaware’s citizens by promoting health and well-being, fostering self-sufficiency, and protecting vulnerable populations.


Trout Stocked in White Clay Creek to Provide Fall Fishing Opportunities

An image of a rainbow trout by the acclaimed fish and wildlife artist Duane Raver

 

Rainbow trout were stocked in White Clay Creek today to provide anglers the opportunity to fish for trout in the fall and winter, the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control announced. About 1,000 pounds of 12- to 13-inch rainbows were stocked from near the Pennsylvania state line downstream to Newark.
Trout anglers are reminded of the following rules and regulations:

  • A Delaware fishing license is required, unless an angler is exempt.
  • A Delaware trout stamp is required through Nov. 30 to fish in White Clay Creek, as well as other designated trout streams stocked earlier this year, unless an angler is exempt.
  • Trout fishing is open one half-hour before sunrise to one half-hour after sunset, unless otherwise restricted by area rules.
  • The daily possession limit is six trout, except for a daily possession limit of four trout when fishing in or within 50 feet of the designated fly-fishing-only section of White Clay Creek.

Managed by the DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife, trout are purchased from hatcheries and stocked using revenue from anglers purchasing Delaware trout stamps. Trout stocking in Delaware is also supported by federal U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fish Restoration funds generated by anglers purchasing fishing equipment.

Delaware fishing licenses and trout stamps are sold online and by license agents statewide. To find a participating agent, or to purchase a license online, visit de.gov/fishinglicenses. For additional information on Delaware fishing licenses and trout stamps, call the DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife licensing office at 302-739-9918.

Additional information on fishing in Delaware is available in the 2021 Delaware Fishing Guide. The guide also is available in printed form from license agents throughout the state, or by request from the DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife Fisheries section by calling 302-739-9914.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities, and educates Delawareans about the environment. The DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife conserves and manages Delaware’s fish and wildlife and their habitats, and provides fishing, hunting, wildlife viewing and boating access on nearly 68,000 acres of public land. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov, or Nikki Lavoie, nikki.lavoie@delaware.gov

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Rosedale Beach Boat Ramp to Close Temporarily for Repairs

DNREC’s Rosedale Boat Ramp will close temporarily Oct. 21 for repairs that include patching a crack that runs down the center of the ramp

 

The Rosedale Beach boat ramp and parking lot on Indian River Bay will temporarily close for ramp repairs beginning Thursday, Oct. 21, the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control announced today. The project will include a concrete patch to repair a large crack that runs along the center of the boat ramp. Project completion is anticipated by Friday, Oct. 29, weather permitting.

Other DNREC public boat ramps on or near Indian River and Indian River Bay include the Division of Fish and Wildlife’s Masseys Landing boat ramp and the Division of Parks and Recreation’s boat ramps at Indian River Marina in Delaware Seashore State Park and at Holt’s Landing State Park.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities, and educates Delawareans about the environment. The DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife conserves and manages Delaware’s fish and wildlife and their habitats, and provides fishing, hunting, wildlife viewing and boating access on nearly 68,000 acres of public land. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov, or Nikki Lavoie, nikki.lavoie@delaware.gov

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