Ellen Priest to Display Paintings Inspired by Jazz in the Mezzanine Gallery in March

Ellen Priest, Individual Artist Fellow in Painting, will present an exhibition of recent work in the Delaware Division of the Arts Mezzanine Gallery from March 1-28, 2013. The Gallery, open weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., is located in the Carvel State Office Building, 820 N. French Street, Wilmington. There will be a reception to meet the artist on Friday, March 1 from 5-8 p.m. as part of Wilmington’s Art Loop.

This solo exhibition of Ellen Priest’s work will showcase mid-sized drawings and layered paintings from two series: the ‘Up Jumped Spring’ series based on Freddie Hubbard’s lyrical jazz waltz, and the Berklee Series “Jazz: Thinking Out Loud, Reaching for Song.” The Berklee Series is the result of a joint painting/jazz project with student composers at Berklee College of Music’s elite Global Jazz Institute.

Priest’s paintings are layered relief constructions made with superimposed layers of opaque and translucent papers, cut away in some sections, collaged with additional forms. The artist listens to the music many times and studies the score to create abstract brush studies painted while the music is playing; almost “choreographing” the forms. The resulting paintings embody a multi-layered space, sometimes open, sometimes dense, depending on the specific musical subject matter, full of color and light.

Priest, a Wilmington-based artist, graduated from the Yale Divinity School, CT and from Lawrence University, WI. She has exhibited in galleries and museums throughout the region and is included in many private and public collections. To read more about the artist, visit her Individual Artist Fellowship page.


Delaware Weights & Measures inspectors protect consumers, businesses

DOVER – More than 9,200 gas pumps across Delaware were checked and inspected for accuracy during 2012 by state Weights and MeasuresPrice inspection inspectors, the first line of defense to make sure Delaware consumers get what they pay for.

Add to that 3,721 retail scales, 234 fuel oil delivery meters and 478 retail price checks, among other inspections, and Delawareans can begin to get a sense of how the Weights & Measures Section of the Delaware Department of Agriculture affects their lives and businesses.

Friday marks the start of National Weights & Measures Week, March 1-7, by the National Conference on Weights and Measures, an opportunity to educate the public about the role of these behind-the-scenes workers. The first United States weights and measures law was signed by President John Adams in 1799.

“We help guarantee that transactions are fair to consumers and businesses, protecting people on both sides of the equation,” said Steve Connors, Weights & Measures Administrator. “It doesn’t matter if you’re purchasing or selling five gallons of milk, 10 gallons of gasoline, 100 gallons of fuel oil or a ton of gravel. We help make sure that consumers get what they pay for. Businesses are protected because even a small error – a fraction of one percent, for example – can lead to losses of thousands of dollars.”

The state’s six Weights & Measures inspectors check items in the state sold by volume, measure or count. They inspect gas pumps and store scales annually, and conduct regular audits and inspections of shelf pricing and packaged product volume. Inspectors are assigned to each county. If a device – such as a gas pump, scale or price scanner – is found to be out of compliance, inspectors will take it out of order until it has been fixed and retested for accuracy.

In 2012, inspectors also checked 136 LPG vehicle tank meters, 83 grain moisture meters and 228 large-capacity vehicle scales, and performed 152 gas-pump octane tests. For net weight compliance, they inspected 1,115 package lots, comprising 19,099 packages, and audited 1,428 package lots, comprised of 6,012,195 packages. They investigated and resolved 66 complaints overall.

“Our inspectors are out in stores and at gas stations every day helping protect Delaware consumers and businesses,” said Secretary of Agriculture Ed Kee. “They work quietly but efficiently to make sure the public can have confidence in getting what they pay for.”

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Contact:
Dan Shortridge
Chief of Community Relations
Delaware Department of Agriculture
302-698-4520


Governors Convene for 2013 National Governors Association Winter Meeting

WASHINGTON—Governors from across the nation gathered in Washington, D.C., for the 2013 National Governors Association (NGA) Winter Meeting. Governors will meet with President Obama, members of his Administration, business leaders and other experts for conversations about issues and challenges facing states.

Led by NGA Chair Delaware Gov. Jack Markell and NGA Vice Chair Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin, business sessions at the event will include opening, special and closing sessions and meetings of the four NGA committees.

The official business portion of the meeting will begin this morning with an opening session that will focus on Gov. Markell’s Chair’s Initiative, A Better Bottom Line: Employing People with Disabilities. This initiative focuses on the employment challenges that affect individuals with intellectual and other disabilities and the roles both state governments and businesses can play in advancing employment opportunities for these individuals. Gregory D. Wasson, president and CEO of Walgreens, will address the governors and then join in a discussion.

“Every governor wants to be the ‘jobs’ governor,” said Gov. Markell. “We can’t forget the people in our states with disabilities; we need to be the jobs governor for them, too. That’s why I’ve chosen to focus my initiative on ways that states and businesses can increase employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities.”

Later today, the Economic Development and Commerce Committee will have a conversation about federal tax reform. Concurrently, the Health and Homeland Security Committee will take on the issue of cybersecurity as well as the nationwide public safety network.

On Sunday morning, governors will gather for a special session on how states can assist businesses in employing people with disabilities. Later that day, the Education and Workforce Committee will look at ways to support teachers and school leaders. Meanwhile, the Natural Resources Committee will meet to discuss extreme weather events and how best to coordinate with the Army Corps of Engineers.

“Through NGA, governors identify the priorities of our states and find common ground that unites us,” said Gov. Fallin. “The NGA Winter Meeting is a great opportunity to learn from our peers and share our own best practices. We certainly have a busy weekend ahead, and I am eager to get to work.”

On Sunday evening, governors and their spouses will join the President and Mrs. Obama at the White House. On Monday, governors will return for a meeting with the President and Vice President.

Prior to Monday’s meeting at the White House, governors will meet in a closing session to consider the NGA policy positions. They also will hear from Dr. Mehmet Oz, host of the The Dr. Oz Show. Throughout the meeting, there also will be “Governors-Only” sessions to provide governors the opportunity for discussion among themselves.

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Founded in 1908, the National Governors Association (NGA) is the collective voice of the nation’s governors and one of Washington, D.C.’s most respected public policy organizations. Its members are the governors of the 55 states, territories and commonwealths. NGA provides governors and their senior staff members with services that range from representing states on Capitol Hill and before the Administration on key federal issues to developing and implementing innovative solutions to public policy challenges through the NGA Center for Best Practices. For more information, visit www.nga.org.


Governor’s Weekly Message: Making Progress: Employment Opportunities for Individuals with Disabilities

(Wilmington, DE) In his weekly message, Governor Markell shares an update on his initiative as Chair of the National Governors Association, which will be highlighted during the NGA’s Winter Meeting this weekend.

“As I join with my colleagues from across the country in Washington D.C. this weekend our Winter Meeting, we will continue to raise awareness with Governors and the private sector about the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities, with two of the nationally televised sessions focused on this topic,” said Governor Markell. “By this summer, we will develop a blueprint with concrete steps that states and businesses can take to provide opportunities that benefit both individuals with disabilities and the companies that employ them. Coming together to ensure we provide every person with the best possible chance to achieve personal and professional success will keep our country and our state moving forward.”

Transcript of the Governor’s Weekly Message:  Making Progress: Employment Opportunities for Individuals with Disabilities

Every Friday, the Governor’s office releases a new Weekly Message in video, audio, and transcript form.  The message is available on:

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Delaware.Gov: http://governor.delaware.gov/information/podcast_video.shtml

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Governor’s Weekly Message Transcript: Making Progress: Employment Opportunities for Individuals with Disabilities

Last summer, I became chair of the National Governors Association, affording me the opportunity to tell Delaware’s story to other state leaders and some of the nation’s largest employers, as well as make our views known on a number of national issues. But as part of my chairmanship, I am also focusing my fellow governors on advancing employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities.

Our initiative is titled, “A Better Bottom Line: Employing People with Disabilities,” It focuses on the employment challenges affecting individuals with intellectual and other disabilities and the roles that both state governments and businesses can play in advancing employment opportunities for these individuals. Halfway through my time as chair, we have made great progress in highlighting the benefits that employees with disabilities can play with employers of all sizes, including improving their bottom line and creating a more welcoming workplace.

As I join with my colleagues from across the country in Washington D.C. this weekend at our Winter Meeting, we’ll continue to raise awareness with Governors and the private sector about the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities, with two of the nationally televised sessions focused on this topic.

By this summer, we will have developed a blueprint with concrete steps that states and businesses can take to provide opportunities that benefit both the individuals and the companies that employ them. It doesn’t matter whether someone was born with additional challenges to face or – in the case of our wounded veterans, for example – acquired them later in life. What matters is what they have to offer and the tremendous impact this will have on their overall well-being and on the bottom line of the businesses that employ them. Coming together to ensure we provide every person with the best possible chance to achieve personal and professional success will keep our country and our state moving forward.