Public Input Regarding OMB Regulations Will Be Accepted Through December 1

DOVER – The Delaware Office of Management and Budget (OMB) today issued a reminder to Delaware business owners and other interested stakeholders that it is still accepting public comment under Governor Markell’s Executive Order 36, which requires agencies to identify unnecessary or overly burdensome regulations to be streamlined or eliminated.

OMB announced that public comments will be accepted online and by mail through December 1. Individuals who wish to submit comments may do so using the agency’s online submission form. Comments may also be mailed to Office of Management and Budget, c/o Jessica Eisenbrey, 122 William Penn Street, Ste. 301, Dover, DE 19901.

Executive Order 36 is a mechanism for agencies to review existing regulations and eliminate outdated or inconsistent regulations or ones that no longer serve their purpose. OMB held public hearings in each county on September 27, October 4 and October 11.

After December 1, the agency will consider the input received and streamline or change regulations accordingly. In June 2013, the Governor’s Office will submit a report to the General Assembly detailing the regulatory changes made by each agency.


Delaware Is Cracking Down on Distracted Driving. Phone in One Hand. Ticket in the Other. Enforcement Campaign Begins November 7th

Dover, DE – The Delaware Office of Highway Safety has teamed up with the U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), and 42 law enforcement agencies across the State to eliminate handheld cell phone use and texting by motorists traveling on Delaware’s roadways.

Beginning November 7 through November 20, Delaware law enforcement will be out in force to make sure drivers keep their eyes on the road and their hands on the wheel.

“Reducing distracted driving improves safety for everyone who shares the road.  Just as we keep our focus as a state on creating more jobs, we want drivers to keep their hands on the wheel and their focus on the road,” Governor Markell said.

Distracted driving is any non-driving activity a person engages in behind the wheel that has the potential to distract him or her from the primary task of driving.

Nationally in 2010, 3,092 people were killed, and an estimated 416,000 others were injured in motor vehicle crashes involving a distracted driver.

“Talking or texting on a cell phone while driving is one of the most dangerous actions you can take on our roadways. Last year, 147 crashes were due to distracted driving. Our new dedicated enforcement campaign, Phone in One Hand. Ticket in the Other. will offer a tough lesson to any driver caught paying attention to their phones instead of the road,” said Lewis D. Schiliro, Secretary of Safety and Homeland Security.

Law enforcement officers will show zero-tolerance for distracted driving.  If they see you talking on your cell phone or texting while driving, they will give you a ticket.

Because too many drivers still don’t get the message that using a cell phone while driving can be dangerous and deadly, this initial distracted driving crackdown marks the first of several enforcement waves taking place over the next year.

Sending or receiving a text message takes a driver’s eyes from the road for an average of 4.6 seconds — the equivalent of a driver driving blind for the length of an entire football field at 55-mph.

In a recent study, 40 percent of all American teens say they have been in a car when the driver used a cell phone in a way that put people in danger.

“These figures may seem like just statistics, but we know that even one life lost or one victim severely injured, is one too many,” said Colonel Robert M. Coupe, Delaware State Police. “More often than we would like, we bring the tragic news to families about the serious injury or death of a loved one that may have been prevented had someone not been driving distracted.”

That’s why Delaware drivers should know that law enforcement is stepping-up enforcement to save lives on Delaware roadways this November. Remember: Phone in One Hand. Ticket in the Other.

For more information on distracted driving, please visit www.distraction.gov/delaware.

 


Governor’s Weekly Message: Thanking Delawareans for Hurricane Sandy Response

No Youtube, go here.

Wilmington –  In his weekly message, the Governor expresses gratitude to Delawareans for pulling together and helping one another get through Hurricane Sandy.

“Our state, local private and non-profit organizations and emergency responders at every level pulled together to get us through this storm,” said Governor Jack Markell. “Many went without sleep or seeing their families to work through the storm. Delawareans displayed an incredible amount of patience with Mother Nature and while we fared better than the forecast predicted and better than surrounding states, our hearts go out to the millions of people in places outside of Delaware who remain traumatized by the storm.”

At noon every Friday, the Governor’s office releases a new Weekly Message in video, audio, and transcript form.  The message is available on:

YouTube: http://youtu.be/EAoT5b20H50
Delaware.Gov:  http://governor.delaware.gov/information/podcast_video.shtml
By email: Please contact our press team to subscribe to our press list
Facebook:  http://www.facebook.com/governormarkell
Twitter:  http://www.twitter.com/governormarkell

Transcript of the Governor’s Weekly Message: Thanking Delawareans for Hurricane Sandy Response


Governor’s Weekly Message Transcript: Thanking Delawareans for Hurricane Sandy Response

No Youtube, go here.

This is a message of thanks.  Thanks to the emergency responders, state agencies, non-profits like Red Cross, volunteers, homeowners and residents of Delaware for pulling together and helping one another get through Hurricane Sandy.

Thank you for heeding the emergency evacuations; for leaving your homes in some cases and going to shelters in others.  For staying off the roads, coping with power outages and placing safety first.

We took the threat seriously and we prepared accordingly.  That’s the way we protect ourselves, our homes and our state.  Our state, local private and non-profit organizations and emergency responders at every level pulled together to get us through this storm.

Many went without sleep or seeing their families to work through the storm. Delawareans displayed an incredible amount of patience with Mother Nature and while we fared better than the forecast predicted and better than surrounding states, our hearts go out to the millions of people in places outside of Delaware who remain traumatized by the storm.  We have our own challenges ahead, as water recedes in our coastal communities and FEMA, the Delaware Emergency Management Agency, local authorities and home and business owners assess damage.  We will pick ourselves up from where this storm left us, grateful we didn’t sustain the worst, knowing we got through it because we stayed together and worked together as Delawareans.  And,  I thank you as citizens, state employees, emergency responders, volunteers and others, each doing your jobs and doing your best to keep Delaware moving forward.


Hurricane Sandy Individual Assistance Claim Process

In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, the clean-up and recovery process may leave many property owners wondering where to go for financial assistance to recover from damages suffered in the storm.  Some aid may be available to qualified property owners through the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

Damage assessment depends upon homeowners and other property owners reporting significant damage and storm related impacts to their local city or county Emergency Management Agency.  The numbers to call to report storm related damage, and the staffing hours are:

In Wilmington – 302-576-CITY (2489)     Number staffed Mon.-Fri.  9am-5pm

In New Castle County – 302-395-5555     Number staffed Mon.-Fri.  8am-4pm

In Kent County – 302-735-3465                Number staffed 24/7

In Sussex County – 302-856-7366             Number staffed 24/7

How should homeowners determine whether to call?  If significant damage to the home caused the resident to move out or if they will have to find other housing while repair work is performed, they should call their city or county Emergency Management Agency at the appropriate number listed.  If the residence is a mobile home and water reached floor level, owners should also call.

Business owners whose business had physical or economic losses that are not covered by private insurance should call their county Emergency Management Agency.

If in doubt, call the proper city or county Emergency Management Agency.  Property owners who fail to call and make a claim could miss an opportunity for financial assistance.