DMV Announces New Medical Tint Waiver Application Process

Effective Monday, August 29, 2022, customers wanting a Medical Tint Waiver will no longer start the application process by picking up a secure paper application in person at a Delaware Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV) location. Instead, they will begin by filling out the online Medical Tint Waiver Application at dmv.de.gov. DMV will continue to process all Medical Tint Waivers previously provided to customers on secure paper through October 31, 2022.

To begin the application process, first-time applicants will go to dmv.de.gov – Online Services – then click on Medical Tint Waiver Application and enter the required information. Then, print the completed application and take it to their physician to sign and approve. Finally, the applicant will present all pages in person at a DMV location for review and final approval. When applying for a Medical Tint Waiver for the first time, customers can include up to four vehicles if they are registered in their name. Residents with a current Medical Tint Wavier will use the same online application to request additional waivers, up to four vehicles per application, if DMV can confirm there is a valid Medical Tint Waiver on file. For instance, if someone with an existing tint waiver purchases a new vehicle, they can now add it to their current waiver without having to get a whole new form signed by their physician.

“We understand your time is valuable,” said Director of the Delaware Division of Motor Vehicles Jana Simpler. “Moving the Medical Tint Waiver Application online, allows us to streamline the process and reduce the number of DMV visits necessary to apply for a Medical Tint Waiver. Also, allowing a person to add up to four vehicles per application, greatly eliminates the need to make multiple trips to your doctor’s office for signatures. The new process will not only save our customers time but money as well.”

Before starting an online application, please make sure:

• The title and registration of the vehicle(s) are in your name
• You have the registration card(s) in front of you
• You have access to a printer
• If you are requesting a Medical Tint Waiver for a non-owner usual operator and/or passenger in your household, you will also need their Delaware identification number, driver license number, and date of birth.
• Your current address is listed on your registration card. If necessary, you can update it via mydmv.de.gov.

DMV grants medical tint waivers when a person/motorist possesses a statement signed by a licensed practitioner of medicine and surgery or osteopathic medicine or optometry verifying that tinted windows are medically necessary for the owner or usual operator of said vehicle per § 4313 Title 21 Delaware Code. Currently, out of 873,500 passenger or truck type vehicles registered in the State of Delaware 49, 615 have a Medical Tint Waiver or 17.6 %.

Questions regarding the new online process? Call 302-744-2500, visit dmv.de.gov, or e-mail DMVcustomerservice@delaware.gov.


Delaware’s Annual Chautauqua Tent Show, Sept. 8–11, 2022

(DOVER, Del. — Aug. 29, 2022) — Entertainment, and the artists who brought it to life, will be explored in Delaware’s 24th annual Chautauqua tent show — “That’s Entertainment!” — that will take place on Thursday and Friday, Sept. 8 and 9, 2022 at Zwaanendael Park located next to the Zwaanendael Museum at 102 Kings Highway, in Lewes, Del.; and on Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 10 and 11, 2022 on the Green located adjacent to the New Castle Court House Museum at 211 Delaware St. in New Castle, Del. For those who cannot attend in person, many Chautauqua activities will also be livestreamed on the web.

A unique mixture of education and entertainment, Chautauqua events in both locations will be held under a large tent and will feature theater, music, dance, film, visual arts, lectures and more. On Sept. 8, 10 and 11, the day’s activities will be capped off with evening performances by actor-historians from the American Historical Theatre portraying, respectively, Buffalo Bill, showman of the American West; sharpshooter Annie Oakley; and Ichabod Crane, a character from Washington Irving’s story, “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.” Sept. 9 events will culminate with a musical performance of songs of the Underground Railroad by Linda Harris and David B. Cole. For a complete listing of Chautauqua activities, go to https://history.delaware.gov/tent-show/.

Photo of Linda Harris and David B. Cole
Songs of the Underground Railroad will be performed by Linda Harris and David B. Cole on Sept. 9.

Admission for all Chautauqua programs is free and open to the public. For additional information, contact the Zwaanendael Museum at mailto:zmusuem@delware.gov or 302-645-1148; or the New Castle Court House Museum at mailto:ncchmuseum@delaware.gov or 302-323-4453.

Chautauqua takes its name from a series of adult education programs that were first held at a campsite on the shores of Lake Chautauqua in upstate New York during the late 19th century. Chautauquas spread throughout America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries bringing speakers, teachers, musicians, entertainers, preachers and specialists of the day to a wide cross-section of the nation’s rural and small-town population. Circuit Chautauquas (also known as Tent Chautauquas) were an itinerant manifestation of the movement. Programs would be presented in tents pitched in a field near town. After several days, the Chautauqua would fold its tents and move on to the next community. The popularity of Chautauquas peaked in the mid-1920s, after which radio, movies and automobiles brought about the gradual disappearance of the movement by the 1940s.

Photo of Kim Hanley as Annie Oakley
Kim Hanley of the American Historical Theatre will portray sharpshooter Annie Oakley on Sept. 10.

Reborn in the 1970s as a vehicle for humanities education, modern Chautauquas are organized around a core program in which re-enactors take on the personas of celebrated historical figures, educating and entertaining audiences as they bring the past to life. Modern Chautauquas have been presented annually in Delaware since 1999 featuring a wide variety of historical figures including George Washington Carver; Lucretia Mott; Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.; Mark Twain; Woodrow Wilson; Teddy Roosevelt; Abraham Lincoln; Amelia Earhart; Dolley Madison; Eleanor Roosevelt; Edgar Allan Poe; the Lone Ranger; John Philip Sousa; and Delaware’s own Pvt. James Elbert, Maj. Allen McLane, F.O.C. Darley and Clifford Brown.

“That’s Entertainment!” is co-sponsored by the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ Zwaanendael and New Castle Court House museums, and the New Castle Historical Society. Partial funding is provided by Delaware Humanities, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Photo of Delaware Humanities logo

The Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs is an agency of the State of Delaware. The division enhances Delaware’s quality of life by preserving the state’s unique historical heritage, fostering community stability and economic vitality and providing educational programs and assistance to the public on Delaware history. The division’s diverse array of services includes operation of five museums, administration of the State Historic Preservation Office, conservation of the State’s archaeological and historic-objects collections, operation of a conference center and management of historic properties across the state. Primary funding for division programs and services is provided by annual appropriations from the Delaware General Assembly and grants from the National Park Service, Department of the Interior, a federal agency. However, the contents and opinions expressed in the division’s programs and services do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the Department of the Interior.

Contact:
Jim Yurasek
Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs
Phone: 302-577-5170
E-mail: Jim.Yurasek@delaware.gov
Web: http://history.delaware.gov


TranspARTation Grant Opportunity for Schools Returns for 2022-2023 School Year

The Delaware Division of the Arts has announced the return of the popular transpARTation grant opportunity for Delaware schools. Schools may request up to $500 toward travel expenses, to include buses, fuel, parking, and tolls associated with these trips.

“Access to the arts is pivotal to our students’ creative learning experiences and academic development as well as a well-rounded curriculum,” says Director Jessica Ball. “We encourage teachers up and down the State to apply for these funds in order to open their students’ eyes to the transformative power of the arts.” 

Recognizing the importance of connecting schools with cultural institutions to promote creative learning, the Delaware Division of the Arts is now accepting applications for TranspARTation Grants— a program developed to assist schools with transportation costs to attend arts and cultural events throughout the state. Schools may request funding to cover travel expenses to include buses, fuel, parking, and tolls associated with the trip. Applications are reviewed in the order they are received until all available funds have been awarded. The deadline is six weeks prior to the project start date. Click here for program guidelines and instructions on how to apply.

To be eligible for a TranspARTation grant, applicants must be a Delaware nonprofit K-12 public, private, charter, or parochial school. Pre-K programs affiliated with public schools are also eligible to apply. Please Note: Schools may receive only one TranspARTation grant per school year. Title I schools may be considered for more than one TranspARTation grant per school year if funding is available.

The grant category was developed in response to feedback received during the Division’s strategic planning process in 2014. “Our constituents urged us to consider ways to increase access to arts education in the state through targeted funding that removes barriers to participation,” said then Division Director Paul Weagraff. “This program addresses that concern and helps to ensure access to quality arts education for all Delaware youth.”

For questions related to this granting program, please contact Sheila Dean Ross at Sheila Dean Ross 302-577-8286 or sheila.ross@delaware.gov.

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Contact: Andrew Truscott, Program Officer, Marketing and Communications

302-577-8280, andrew.truscott@delaware.gov

The Delaware Division of the Arts, a branch of the Delaware Department of State, is dedicated to cultivating and supporting the arts to enhance the quality of life for all Delawareans. Together with its advisory body, the Delaware State Arts Council, the Division administers grants and programs that support arts programming, educate the public, increase awareness of the arts, and integrate the arts into all facets of Delaware life. For more information about the Delaware Division of the Arts, visit arts.delaware.gov or call 302-577-8278.


Historical Affairs programs in September 2022

(DOVER, Del. — Aug. 16, 2022) — The Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs will be sponsoring seven special programs during the month of September 2022. A full schedule is included below. Admission is free and open to the public, but reservations are required for some programs. Go to the following link for additional information and reservation instructions: https://history.delaware.gov/2022/08/01/hca-programs-sept-2022/.

Painting depicting the Battle of the Chesapeake
Painting depicting the Battle of the Chesapeake from the Hampton Roads Naval Museum, Norfolk, Va. The battle will be explored in a Sept. 24, 2022 program at The Old State House.

Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs special programs, September 2022

Thursday, Sept. 8, 2022
“That’s Entertainment.” Delaware’s 24th annual Chautauqua tent show featuring a day-long series of activities culminating with Bob Gleason of the American Historical Theatre portraying Buffalo Bill. Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ Zwaanendael Museum, 102 Kings Highway, Lewes. Noon–9 p.m. 302-645-1148 or mailto:zmuseum@delaware.gov.

Friday, Sept. 9, 2022
“That’s Entertainment.” Delaware’s 24th annual Chautauqua tent show featuring a day-long series of activities culminating with a musical performance of songs of the Underground Railroad by Linda Harris and David B. Cole. Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ Zwaanendael Museum, 102 Kings Highway, Lewes. Noon–9 p.m. 302-645-1148 or mailto:zmuseum@delaware.gov.

Saturday, Sept. 10, 2022
“That’s Entertainment.” Delaware’s 24th annual Chautauqua tent show featuring a day-long series of activities culminating with Kim Hanley of the American Historical Theatre portraying sharpshooter Annie Oakley. The Green adjacent to the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ New Castle Court House Museum, 211 Delaware St., New Castle. Noon–6:30 p.m. 302-323-4453 or mailto:NCCHmuseum@delaware.gov.

Sunday, Sept. 11, 2022
“That’s Entertainment.” Delaware’s 24th annual Chautauqua tent show featuring a day-long series of activities culminating with Neill Hartley of the American Historical Theatre portraying Ichabod Crane, a character from Washington Irving’s story, “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.” The Green adjacent to the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ New Castle Court House Museum, 211 Delaware St., New Castle. Noon–6:30 p.m. 302-323-4453 or mailto:NCCHmuseum@delaware.gov.

Saturday, Sept. 24, 2022
Cooch’s Bridge Historic Site: Touring the homestead. Join historical interpreters for this introductory program on the history of the Cooch’s Bridge homestead. Learn about some of the individuals who lived on the property, how they shaped the land around them and how the location’s landscape contributed to national history. Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ Cooch’s Bridge Historic Site, 961 South Old Baltimore Pike, Newark. Tours at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Limit 20 visitors per tour. Free admission but reservations required. 302-922-7116 or mailto:CBmuseum@delaware.gov. NOTE: Both tours are fully booked.

Saturday, Sept. 24, 2022
“The Battle of the Chesapeake.” Multi-media presentation by historical interpreter Tom Welch on how the French fleet under Adm. de Grasse paved the way for the surrender of Gen. Cornwallis at Yorktown and the ultimate victory for the American forces over the British. Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ Old State House, 25 The Green, Dover. 1 p.m. 302-744-5054 or mailto:OSHmuseum@delaware.gov.

Friday, Sept. 30, 2022
“Well Seasoned Heirlooms.” In this virtual series, historic-site interpreter Kimberly Fritsch of the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ New Castle Court House Museum shines a spotlight on the practices, recipes and women throughout Delaware history as they speak to us through their food. Cookbooks became a way for women to pass along their legacy and convey a sense of what was important in their culture, daily lives and, even, weather occurrences and events of the time. Program streamed live via Zoom. Noon. Free but registration required. 302-323-4453 or mailto:NCCHmuseum@delaware.gov.

Remaining division program in August 2022

In addition, the division will be presenting the following programs during the remainder of August.

Saturday, Aug. 27, 2022
“Restorative Justice.” Talk by Charito Calvachi-Mateyko examines the modern concept of criminal justice and the theory of restorative justice as an alternative to the current system. Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ New Castle Court House Museum, 211 Delaware St., New Castle. Noon. 302-323-4453 or mailto:NCCHmuseum@delaware.gov.

Monday, Aug. 29, 2022
“Winner! Winner! Chicken Dinner: Delaware’s Woman of Steele!” Virtual program in which historic site interpreter Kimberly Fritsch of the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ New Castle Court House Museum explores Delaware’s chicken industry and the first major breeder of Delaware chickens — Cecile Steele. The event will also feature a chicken recipe. Part of the series, “Well Seasoned Heirlooms,” which shines a spotlight on the culinary practices, recipes and personalized cookbooks of women throughout Delaware history as they speak to us through their food. Program streamed live via Zoom. Noon. Free but registration required by going to the following: https://history.delaware.gov/2022/07/04/hca-programs-august-2022/. 302-323-4453 or mailto:NCCHmuseum@delaware.gov.

Administered by the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs, the five museums of the State of Delaware — the John Dickinson Plantation, the Johnson Victrola Museum, the New Castle Court House Museum, The Old State House and the Zwaanendael Museum — tell the story of the First State’s contributions to the history and culture of the United States. Through tours, exhibits and special programs, the museums shine a spotlight on Delaware’s unique history and the diverse people who came to live there. The museums are accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. The New Castle Court House Museum and the John Dickinson Plantation are partner sites of the First State National Historical Park. The Old State House is located on the Dover Green, another partner site of the park. Go to the following for a long-term calendar of division-sponsored events.


The Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs is an agency of the State of Delaware. The division enhances Delaware’s quality of life by preserving the state’s unique historical heritage, fostering community stability and economic vitality and providing educational programs and assistance to the public on Delaware history. The division’s diverse array of services includes operation of five museums, administration of the State Historic Preservation Office, conservation of the State’s archaeological and historic-objects collections, operation of a conference center and management of historic properties across the state. Primary funding for division programs and services is provided by annual appropriations from the Delaware General Assembly and grants from the National Park Service, Department of the Interior, a federal agency. However, the contents and opinions expressed in the division’s programs and services do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the Department of the Interior.

Contact:
Jim Yurasek
Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs
Phone: 302-577-5170
E-mail: Jim.Yurasek@delaware.gov
Web: http://history.delaware.gov


DelDOT Offers Sign Placement Law Reminder Ahead of Election Season

As election season approaches, the Delaware Department of Transportation reminds all candidates and individuals supporting candidates of the rules related to placing campaign signs in public right-of-way.

Signs are allowed 30 days before and 30 days after any election recognized by the Delaware Department of Elections. With the primary election taking place on Tuesday, September 13, 2022, the placement of signs will be allowed beginning on Sunday, August 14, 2022.

All signage must be placed a minimum of 10 feet from the edge of the roadway, and signs may not be placed in medians, islands, gore areas or attached to any infrastructure such as road signage, bridges, poles or trees.

Sign owners are subject to fines of $25 per sign for violation of sign placement and a recovery fee of $15 per sign. Confiscated signs will be disposed of after 30 days.

DelDOT right-of-way agents will be enforcing the sign laws throughout the election season. These rules aren’t just for the safety of motorists, but also for anyone out placing signs along busy roads.

More information, including a Frequently Asked Question page, can be found on the DelDOT website.