DNREC Lifts Recreational Swimming Advisory for Rehoboth Beach

DNREC lifted the recreational swimming advisory for Rehoboth Beach at Rehoboth Avenue late Friday afternoon after water quality tests taken Thursday showed bacteria levels had returned below the advisory level.

The advisory had been issued Thursday based on results from Wednesday’s regularly scheduled sampling by DNREC’s Recreational Water Program. Ocean beach swimming advisories based on bacteria levels usually end after a day or so.

DNREC water quality experts say the elevated level of bacteria that caused the Rehoboth advisory is most likely associated with rainfall that occurred on Tuesday night. These bacteria often originate from wildlife sources and increased rainfall, waves or wildlife feeding near the surf (shorebirds, marine mammals or other warm-blooded animals), which can result in these indicator bacteria washing into near-shore waters.

The current advisory status and history of test results for monitored recreational waters in Delaware, including ocean and bay beaches as well as some inland ponds, is at https://recwaters.dnrec.delaware.gov/. Anyone can sign up at the site to be notified of water advisories when they are issued.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. For more information, visit the website and connect with DNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contact: Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov

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DNREC Young Environmentalists of the Year Announced at Delaware State Fair

Governor John Carney and DNREC Secretary Shawn M. Garvin give Charli Evans, center, a big thumbs-up
as DNREC’s Elementary School Young Environmentalist of the Year at the Delaware State Fair.
DNREC photo.

Today at the Delaware State Fair in Harrington, a group of dedicated Delaware students were honored for their work to protect, restore or enhance our state’s natural resources as Governor John Carney and DNREC Secretary Shawn M. Garvin announced this year’s recipients of the DNREC Young Environmentalists of the Year Awards.

“Every Delawarean, no matter their age, can have an impact in protecting and conserving our natural resources, while also raising awareness for environmental stewardship. At ages 7 to 16, these young people have taken a stand as environmental advocates who are already making a difference today for a better tomorrow,” said Secretary Garvin. “We are inspired by the award winners’ dedication to making our state a better place to live through their time and talents, and we look forward to seeing what they will do in the years to come.”

Elementary School:

  •  Charli Rose Evans, age 7, of Laurel, practices self-sustaining farming techniques, growing food for her family and saving the seeds to replant her garden, which also helps feed her chickens, ducks and goats. Charli even makes her own garden fertilizer by composting food waste to mix with manure from her animals.

Middle School:

  •  Lilyan Farris, age 10, of Bridgeville, is dedicated to “reduce, reuse and recycle” to help children in need by collecting and cleaning used books, board games, puzzles, art supplies and bicycles. Lilyan has kept more than 3,000 books out of landfills to stock little free libraries and rescued 25 bicycles last year for an organization that collects and fixes up used bikes.
  •  Catherine Shapiro, age 14, of Wilmington, is a student leader in Springer Middle School’s Energy Club, with activities including conducting a school energy audit, organizing an eco-event, advocating water conservation and carbon footprint reduction, and surveying biodiversity and pollinators.

High School:

  •  Noor Boukari, age 16, of Dover, advocates for sustainability, conducted an award-winning study on bee population decline and received national recognition for her panel discussion and interviews on “Women and Green Futures” at Social Builders US.
  • Maisie Donohue, age 15, of Wilmington, is an environmental activist who is passionate about climate change education and environmentally friendly diets. Maisie served on the YES! Committee to plan a youth summit for 1,000 students in February and is an accomplished public speaker and budding lobbyist, participating in events such the University of Delaware’s Youth Climate Strike last fall.

Now in its 27th year, DNREC’s Young Environmentalist of the Year Awards program recognizes Delaware students whose actions have helped protect, restore or enhance our natural resources by initiating an innovative project, practicing environmental stewardship, increasing public awareness or demonstrating environmental ethics. For more information, visit dnrec.alpha.delaware.gov/young-environmentalists.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. For more information, visit the website and connect with DNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Joanna Wilson, joanna.wilson@delaware.gov; Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov

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DNREC Issues Recreational Swimming Advisory for Rehoboth Beach

DNREC has issued a recreational swimming advisory for Rehoboth Beach at Rehoboth Avenue based on elevated levels of bacteria found in a sample taken Wednesday by the Department’s environmental scientists.

The elevated levels of bacteria is most likely associated with rainfall that occurred on Tuesday night. These bacteria often originate from wildlife sources and increased rainfall, waves or wildlife feeding near the surf (shorebirds, marine mammals or other warm-blooded animals), which can result in these indicator bacteria washing into near-shore waters.

DNREC’s Recreational Water Program staff is collecting another water sample, with results from it available Friday afternoon, at which time a decision will be made to lift the current recreational swimming advisory or to extend it. Ocean beach swimming advisories usually can be ended after a day or so.

The City of Rehoboth Beach has been notified of the recreational advisory, and notice has gone out on DNREC’s Recreational Water advisory notification listserv.

Additional information on recreational swimming advisories and DNREC’s water testing program, and instructions on how to join the advisory notification list, can be found at https://dnrec.alpha.delaware.gov/watershed-stewardship/assessment/recreational-water-monitoring/

The current advisory status for DNREC-monitored beaches and water bodies is at https://recwaters.dnrec.delaware.gov/.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. The Division of Watershed Stewardship develops and implements innovative watershed assessment, monitoring and implementation activities. For more information, visit the website and connect with DNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contact: Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov

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DNREC Extends Public Comment Period Until Aug. 15 on Croda Permit Application

The public comment period on a pending application for an air permit for Croda Inc. will be extended until Aug. 15, 2020. The previous announced deadline was July 31, 2020.

Croda has requested a federally enforceable 7 DE Admin. Code 1102 construction permit for their facility at 315 Cherry Lane, in New Castle, to add a 12,000-gallon drumming tank (Blend Drumming Tank C, Emission Unit 2) to existing Blend Tanks A and B. The emission increase for the addition of Blend Tank C will be 0.36 ton per year (TPY) of volatile organic compounds (VOC) including 0.17 TPY hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) (primarily dioxane).

An informational public meeting was held virtually on this application on July 16, and a virtual public hearing was held on July 21. The official hearing transcript, along with information about this pending application, all exhibits entered into the hearing record, and all comments received on this matter to date, are available for review on the Croda hearing page at https://dnrec.alpha.delaware.gov/events/virtual-public-hearing-croda-7-de-admin-code-1102-construction-permit/

Public comments may be submitted:

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. For more information, visit the website and connect with DNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contact: Michael Globetti, Michael.globetti@delaware.gov

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DNREC Announces Killens Pond State Park Water Park to Reopen Friday After Cleaning, Negative Tests

The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control will reopen the Killens Pond State Park Water Park on Friday, July 24, following its closure last week after a staff member tested positive for COVID-19. Through the Division of Public Health, contact tracing was completed, water park staff who met the definition of close contact with the positive staff member were tested and all results were negative.

The staff members who tested negative are following the DPH-recommended quarantine period from their last exposure to the staff member who tested positive.  Other water park staff have continued routine cleaning during this week’s closure and a deep clean with spray sanitizer will be completed Thursday.

For health and safety reasons, the water park hours will continue to include two sessions per day, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 2:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. The facility is closed Wednesdays and Thursdays. Visitor capacity at the water park will continue to maintain 30% of capacity. Guests must reserve a session online prior to visiting the water park. Tickets will not be available for purchase at the park.

The following protocols and procedures are in effect until further notice:

  • Masks or other cloth face coverings are required for entry into the water park, while in line, in concession areas and restrooms, and when social distancing of at least 6 feet between those of other households cannot be maintained.
  • Face coverings may be removed once on the pool deck, but must continue to be worn when social distancing is not possible.
  • Face coverings are not required while in the water. Any face coverings visitors choose to wear while in the water must be made of swimsuit-type material (man-made fibers). Standard face coverings made from cotton may make it difficult to breathe when wet.
  • Guests must continue to social distance when in the water.
  • Bathrooms and slide handrails will be sanitized every hour, and all other touch points will be sanitized between sessions.
  • All other COVID-19-related rules, regulations and recommendations from the Division of Public Health apply.
  • All other Water Park rules and regulations apply.

Water park entrance fees are $6 for those under 48 inches and $8 for those 48 inches and taller. Entry is free for children ages 2 and younger. The water park features attractions for all ages and abilities, including a main pool, baby pool, slides, fountains and a variety of other fun water features.

About DNREC

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities, and educates Delawareans about the environment. The Division of Parks and Recreation oversees more than 26,000 acres in 17 state parks and the Brandywine Zoo. For more information, visit the website and connect with DNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Shauna McVey, shauna.mcvey@delaware.gov or Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov.