Young Anglers Invited to Enter Semi-virtual Youth Fishing Tournament

Annual Free Fishing Days Designated for June 5 and 6

Families are invited to bring their kids out to try casting a line for a big fish in freshwater public ponds throughout the state when the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control holds its 35th annual Youth Fishing Tournament from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday, June 5, 2021. The tournament is free of charge and will be held rain or shine.

This year, the tournament will be held at more than 30 public freshwater fishing ponds as a fish-on-your-own, semi-virtual event for children age 4 to 15. Participants must be accompanied by a parent or guardian and should bring their own fishing equipment.

The tournament was established by the DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife and is sponsored by the Delaware Natural Resources Police to introduce youth to the sport of fishing and to teach the catch-and-release approach to conservation, which is encouraged for all participants.

All preregistered participants will receive prizes. Prizes for the longest fish in each species category will be awarded in three age groups: 4 to 7, 8 to 11 and 12 to 15. Trophies will be awarded to participants who catch the longest fish in each age group, regardless of species.

To participate for prizes, young anglers must fish at one of the tournament’s designated freshwater fishing ponds, and parents or guardians must submit a registration form by noon, Tuesday, June 1.

Catch measurements should be submitted using the free Chaos fishing app, by including a photo of the fish on a Delaware fishing ruler or other ruler or tape measure with readable numbers to show the length of the catch. The app is downloadable by clicking login/register in the top right corner of the tournament web page and searching tournaments for Delaware Natural Resources Police. Creating an account on the app in advance of the tournament day is recommended, with more app user information available on YouTube.

The tournament is part of Delaware’s observance of National Fishing and Boating Week, June 5 to 13, which also includes DNREC’s annual designation of free fishing days for June 5 and 6 this year, when anyone may fish in Delaware waters without a fishing license. Anglers age 16 and over fishing without a fishing license during the free fishing days require a free Fishermen Information Network (FIN) number, available at license agents statewide and online at epermitting.dnrec.delaware.gov/get-a-fin. For more fishing information, visit the 2021 Delaware Fishing Guide.

Tournament participants and accompanying adults, along with anglers on free fishing days, are required to follow COVID-19 outdoor health and safety guidelines in effect the day of the tournament. Anglers and families must also follow all local rules and regulations at their chosen fishing site.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities, and educates Delawareans about the environment. The DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife conserves and manages Delaware’s fish and wildlife and their habitats, and provides fishing, hunting, wildlife viewing and boating access on nearly 65,000 acres of public land. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on FacebookTwitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Joanna Wilson, joanna.wilson@delaware.gov; Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov


New Head of DNREC Division of Air Quality Named

Angela Marconi to Succeed Retiring Director David Fees in the Position

Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control Secretary Shawn M. Garvin has named Angela Marconi the new director of DNREC’s Division of Air Quality, succeeding David Fees, who is retiring at the end of May from DNREC after 25-plus years in state government. Joining DNREC in 1995 as an engineer, Fees rose through career-ladder promotions and held several management positions prior to leading the division that addresses Delaware’s air quality issues, ensures regulatory compliance with air permits, and enforces the state’s air quality regulations in conjunction with the federal Clean Air Act.

“I thank Dave Fees for his dedication to the Department and the people of Delaware,” said DNREC Secretary Shawn M. Garvin. “In naming Angela Marconi as his successor, I know we have an experienced leader moving us into the future.”

David Fees
Retiring DNREC Division of Air Quality Director David Fees

For the last four years at DNREC, Marconi, an environmental engineer and program manager, has been responsible for all air permits issued in the state, overseeing a team that includes managers, engineers and support staff. “The Division of Air Quality’s Engineering and Compliance section – which includes all air quality permitting, compliance and enforcement work – has done an outstanding job under her management,” Secretary Garvin said.

Angela Marconi
New DNREC Division of Air Quality Director Angela Marconi

Before coming to DNREC in 2015, Marconi, who holds a master’s degree in civil engineering from the University of Delaware, with a concentration in environmental engineering, worked in engineering positions with Cabe Associates and the Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA).

In his 26-year career at DNREC Fees managed the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) reporting program, the air emissions inventory program, and the Airshed Planning and Inventory Program, developing regulations and the state implementation plan under the Clean Air Act. He became director of DNREC’s Division of Air Quality in 2018.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. The DNREC Division of Air Quality monitors and regulates all emissions to the air. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on FacebookTwitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Nikki Lavoie, nikki.lavoie@delaware.gov; Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov


DNREC to Issue Off-Peak Surf Fishing Permits Starting May 25

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control will launch an off-peak surf fishing permit pilot program starting Tuesday, May 25. The pilot program is being introduced in response to unprecedented surf fishing permit sales and to provide an opportunity to allow more anglers and beach users to safely social distance during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The off-peak permits will allow anglers to drive-on surf fish during times when Delaware State Park beaches are not at capacity. In addition to entry onto drive-on beaches, the off-peak permit allows entry into all Delaware State Parks without paying the daily entrance fee.

The permits may be used Mondays through Fridays only, starting June 1 through Sept. 3. Memorial Day and Labor Day are excluded. Starting Tuesday, Sept. 7 through Dec. 31, the off-peak permit may be used seven days a week. The off-peak permits are valid through Dec. 31, 2021.

The off-peak permit fee for Delaware residents is $70, while the fee for out-of-state residents is $140. Delaware residents age 62 and older will receive a discounted rate of $60.

To purchase an off-peak surf fishing permit, visit any park office within Delaware State Parks. There is no cap on the number of off-peak surf fishing permits to be issued. Online sales of these permits will be added in future weeks.

Following the summer season, this pilot of allowing off-peak permits will be evaluated and adjusted if necessary.

For surf fishing rules, regulations and other important information, go to www.destateparks.com/adventures/fishing. Anyone concerned about an individual or group in any state park or wildlife area may contact DNREC’s Natural Resources Police via Tip411, DNREC’s smartphone app, or by calling the 24-hour DNREC Dispatch Center at 302-739-4580. Tip411 allows the public to easily report concerns. The app is available for free download by searching DENRP via the Google Play Store or the iTunes App Store.

About DNREC

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. The DNREC Division of Parks and Recreation oversees more than 26,000 acres in 17 state parks and the Brandywine Zoo. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Shauna McVey, shauna.mcvey@delaware.gov or Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov.

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Downstate Public Ponds to Be Treated for Invasive Aquatic Weed Hydrilla

With inland water temperatures rising and aquatic plants emerging, the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control will be treating certain downstate public ponds for the nuisance aquatic weed hydrilla, starting the week of May 24, 2021. Hydrilla is a non-native, invasive plant that likely entered the state through the aquarium trade. Uncontrolled hydrilla can choke ponds and other waterways, crowding out beneficial plant species and preventing fishing and boating access.

Ponds to be treated this year are Millsboro Pond, Tub Mill Pond and Abbotts Mill Pond near Milford, and Wagamons Pond in Milton. Signs will be posted at the boat ramp of each pond on the day of treatment.

Sonar, an aquatic herbicide containing fluridone, will be used to treat the ponds for hydrilla. Sonar is registered and approved for use by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. It has been used in Delaware since the 1980s and has proven to be environmentally-compatible and effective for controlling hydrilla. Sonar does not pose a threat to wildlife, including fish, and there are no restrictions on fishing or consumption of fish after these treatments.

The only restriction is water from the treated ponds should not be used for irrigation for 30 days after the date of treatment. Residents and farmers along and directly downstream of treated ponds should not use the water to irrigate their gardens, yards or agricultural lands during that period to avoid possible damage to their plantings. Landowners with permits to use water from these ponds will be directly notified before treatment.

To prevent the spread of hydrilla and other invasive aquatic vegetation, anglers and boaters are encouraged to remove all hydrilla and other aquatic plants from their boats, trailers and gear before leaving boat ramp areas.

For additional information, contact the DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife at 302-739-9914.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities, and educates Delawareans about the environment. The DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife conserves and manages Delaware’s fish and wildlife and their habitats, and provides fishing, hunting, wildlife viewing and boating access on nearly 65,000 acres of public land. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Joanna Wilson, joanna.wilson@delaware.gov; Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov

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Nominations Open for 2021 Young Environmentalist Awards

Nominate a Student Making a Difference for the Environment Today

The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control is looking for Delaware students who are working to make a difference for the environment, and encouraging teachers, classmates, club or group leaders, family members and others to nominate these students for the 2021 Young Environmentalist of the Year Awards. Nominations must be based on actions or projects which have taken place between July 1, 2020 and June 30, 2021.

The Young Environmentalist program honors Delaware students whose actions have helped protect, restore or enhance Delaware’s natural resources through one or more of the following: demonstrating environmental stewardship, initiating an innovative project, increasing public awareness or demonstrating environmental ethics.

Nominations will be accepted through Wednesday, June 30, 2021. A winner will be chosen from each of the following categories: elementary (grades 1 to 4), middle school (grades 5 to 8), and high school (grades 9 to 12). Each category winner will receive a certificate, gift card and prize pack in recognition of his or her contribution to the community.

This is the 28th year for DNREC’s Young Environmentalist awards program. Past honorees have included students who planned community cleanups and tree plantings, founded or led school environmental clubs or projects and volunteered at parks and nature centers, as well as beekeepers, nature photographers, recycling advocates and young lobbyists.

An awards ceremony is tentatively scheduled for Governor’s Day, Thursday, July 29, at the Delaware State Fair, with details to be announced in the summer. All plans are subject to change based on health and safety considerations and any changes will be announced.

To nominate a student for the awards, or for more information, including the nomination form, visit DNREC Young Environmentalists, or email joanna.wilson@delaware.gov.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Joanna Wilson, joanna.wilson@delaware.gov; Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov

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