Delaware Surf-Fishing Permits are Sold Out After Reaching Annual Cap

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control announced today it has reached its cap of 17,000 Delaware Surf-Fishing Permits issued for the calendar year. With the Surf-Fishing Permit cap figure attained, no more surf tag permits will be issued until December.

The cap was reached early this year after unprecedented winter sales. The DNREC Division of Parks and Recreation utilized an ongoing outreach effort to communicate that permits were on sale. Previous permit holders were also notified when sales started in December and reminded again today when total sales reached 16,000, at which point the remaining permits available sold out in one hour.

In 2019, the Delaware Parks and Recreation Advisory Council established a 17,000 cap on annual Surf-Fishing Permit sales. The DNREC Division of Parks and Recreation implemented a first-come, first-served cap on the number of permits issued as the most equitable way to serve all beach users, and to manage a limited resource, while also protecting against overcrowding of parks beaches. This plan aligns with DNREC’s priority to ensure a safe and enjoyable experience for all visitors to Delaware’s state parks system.

While surf fishing permit sales have ended for 2021, novice surf anglers are encouraged to view the “Surf Fishing at Delaware State Parks” informational video that explains surf-fishing rules and regulations in Delaware, what equipment is needed, how to drive on the beach and what to do if a vehicle gets stuck in the sand.

Surf-Fishing Permits also serve as a Delaware State Parks Annual Pass that provides access to all 17 state parks. Park user fees, including surf-fishing permit fees, provide 65% of the Division of Parks and Recreation’s funding, and are used to operate and maintain the parks.

To learn more about fishing in Delaware State Parks, visit destateparks.com/Adventures/Fishing.

About DNREC

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. For more information, visit the website and connect with DNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Shauna McVey, shauna.mcvey@delaware.gov, Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov

 

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Zwaanendael Museum seeks plastic recyclables

(DOVER, Del. — Jan. 7, 2021) — The Zwaanendael Museum, located at 102 Kings Highway in Lewes, Del., is currently seeking donations of plastic bottles and bags that will be used to offset the purchase price of a recycled-plastic bench that will be placed outside the front entrance of the museum.
 

Photo of recycling receptacles outside the Zwaanendael Museum
Recycling receptacles outside the Zwaanendael Museum

 
Receptacles for collecting the materials — one for plastic bottles and another for plastic bags — have been placed in the same location where the bench will eventually be located. People interested in helping the museum need only place their plastic items in the respective receptacle now through March 2021. The museum plans to “unveil” its new bench on Earth Day, April 22, 2021. For additional information about the project, contact the museum via e-mail at zmuseum@delaware.gov or by telephone at 302-645-1148.

Manufactured by Eco Plastic Products of Delaware, a Wilmington-based nonprofit that collects discarded plastic and converts it into useful and sustainable products, the museum’s park bench will be six-feet long and weigh 127 pounds. If the museum collects the weight of the bench in plastic recyclables, it will receive a $31.75 ($0.25 per pound) discount off the bench’s price tag while also supporting the sentiment expressed in Eco Plastic’s slogan “Saving the Oceans One Plastic Bag at a Time.”
 

Photo of a park bench manufactured by Eco Plastic Products of Delaware
Park bench manufactured by Eco Plastic Products of Delaware

The Zwaanendael Museum was built in 1931 to commemorate the 300th anniversary of the state’s first European colony, Swanendael, established by the Dutch along Hoorn Kill (present-day Lewes-Rehoboth Canal) in 1631. Designed by E. William Martin (architect of Legislative Hall and the Hall of Records in Dover), the museum is modeled after the town hall in Hoorn, the Netherlands, and features a stepped google gable with carved stonework and decorated shutters. The museum’s exhibits and presentations provide a showcase for Lewes-area maritime, military and social history.

Photo of Zwaanendael Museum
Zwaanendael Museum

 
The Zwaanendael Museum is administered by the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs, an agency of the State of Delaware. The division enhances Delaware’s quality of life by preserving the state’s unique historical heritage, fostering community stability and economic vitality and providing educational programs and assistance to the general public on Delaware history. The division’s diverse array of services includes operation of five museums which are accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, administration of the State Historic Preservation Office, conservation of the state’s archaeological and historic-objects collections, operation of a conference center and management of historic properties across the state. Primary funding for division programs and services is provided by annual appropriations from the Delaware General Assembly and grants from the National Park Service, Department of the Interior, a federal agency. However, the contents and opinions expressed in the division’s programs and services do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the Department of the Interior.
 

Picture of the Logo of the American Alliance of Museums logo

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Contact:
Jim Yurasek
Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs
Phone: 302-608-5326
E-mail: Jim.Yurasek@delaware.gov
Web: http://history.delaware.gov


Four Virtual Programs at State Museums in January 2021

(DOVER, Del. — Dec. 21, 2020) — Cross-stitching, the wreck of the DeBraak, artist Francis Barraud and forgotten presidents will be explored in virtual programs streamed live on the Web by Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs museums during the month of January 2020. All programs are free and open to the public. Go to the following for additional information and reservation instructions: https://history.delaware.gov/2020/12/21/hca-programs-jan-2021.

Photo of Steven Mumford as Francis Baurraud
Museum interpreter Steven Mumford will portray the artist whose painting of a dog staring into a talking machine became the trademark of the Victor Talking Machine Company. The program, “Francis Barraud: His Master’s Voice,” will be streamed live from the Johnson Victrola Museum on Jan. 22, 2021.

Live virtual-programs in January 2021

Saturday, Jan. 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30, 2021
“Stitching on the Light: A Virtual Stitch Along.” Online program developed by Madeline Golden, former Zwaanendael Museum historical interpreter, in which participants create a cross-stitch embroidery featuring Lewes-area lighthouses. On Jan. 2, 9, 23 and 30, portions of the cross-stitch pattern and instructions will be posted on the museum’s Facebook and Instagram accounts. On Jan. 16 at 3:30 p.m., Golden will conduct a cross-stitch workshop streamed live via Zoom and on the museum’s Facebook page. 302-645-1148 or mailto:zmuseum@delaware.gov.

Thursday, Jan. 7, 2021
“The Wreck of the DeBraak.” Virtual program explores the history of the British warship DeBraak which sank off the coast of Lewes in May of 1798 only to be recovered by treasure hunters nearly 200 years later. 3:30 p.m. 302-645-1148 or mailto:zmuseum@delaware.gov.

Friday, Jan. 22, 2021
“Francis Barraud: His Master’s Voice.” Virtual living-history performance from Dover’s Johnson Victrola Museum in which historic-site interpreter Steven Mumford portrays artist Francis Barraud whose painting of a dog staring into a talking machine became the trademark of the Victor Talking Machine Company. 6 p.m. 302-739-3262 or mailto:JVmuseum@delaware.gov.

Saturday, Jan. 23, 2021
“Forgettable/Forgotten Presidents and How the Presidency Has Evolved.” Virtual presentation from the New Castle Court House Museum in which historic-site interpreter Bob Vander Decker explores the presidents of the Continental Congress through the ratification of the Articles of Confederation and U.S. Constitution. The program will explain why there have been 62 men elected to the office of president but Joe Biden is only listed as number 46. 1 p.m. 302-323-4453 or mailto:NCCHmuseum@delaware.gov.

Administered by the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs, the five museums of the State of Delaware—the John Dickinson Plantation, the Johnson Victrola Museum, the New Castle Court House Museum, The Old State House and the Zwaanendael Museum—tell the story of the First State’s contributions to the history and culture of the United States. Through tours, exhibits, and special programs, the museums shine a spotlight on Delaware’s unique history and the diverse people who came to live there. The museums are accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. The New Castle Court House Museum and the John Dickinson Plantation are partner sites of the First State National Historical Park. The Old State House is located on the Dover Green, another partner site of the park. Go to the following for a long-term calendar of division-sponsored events.

Picture of the Logo of the American Alliance of Museums

 

The Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs is an agency of the State of Delaware. The division enhances Delaware’s quality of life by preserving the state’s unique historical heritage, fostering community stability and economic vitality and providing educational programs and assistance to the general public on Delaware history. The division’s diverse array of services includes operation of five museums, administration of the State Historic Preservation Office, conservation of the state’s archaeological and historic-objects collections, operation of a conference center and management of historic properties across the state. Primary funding for division programs and services is provided by annual appropriations from the Delaware General Assembly and grants from the National Park Service, Department of the Interior, a federal agency. However, the contents and opinions expressed in the division’s programs and services do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the Department of the Interior.

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Contact:
Jim Yurasek
Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs
Phone: 302-608-5326
E-mail: Jim.Yurasek@delaware.gov
Web: http://history.delaware.gov


“Stitching On the Light: A Virtual Stitch Along”

-Online program from the Zwaanendael Museum during January 2021-

Photo of Madeline Golden working on a cross-stitch pattern.
Madeline Golden working on a cross-stitch pattern that features a likeness of the Zwaanendael Museum. Golden will be conducting a cross-stitch workshop on Jan. 16, 2020 as part of the “Stitching on the Light: A Virtual Stitch Along” program.

(DOVER, Del. — Dec. 18, 2020) — During the month of January 2021, the Zwaanendael Museum in Lewes, Del. will be conducting the online program “Stitching on the Light: A Virtual Stitch Along” in which participants create their own cross-stitch embroidery featuring likenesses of Lewes-area lighthouses including the Harbor of Refuge, Delaware Breakwater East End, and Fenwick Island lighthouses. Cross stitch is a form of needlework in which X-shaped stitches are used to form a picture.

On Jan. 2, 9, 23 and 30, portions of the cross-stitch pattern and instructions will be posted on the museum’s Facebook and Instagram accounts. On Jan. 16 at 3:30 p.m., former Zwaanendael Museum historical interpreter Madeline Golden will conduct a cross-stitch workshop streamed live via Zoom (registration required by going to the following hyperlink: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_zlK-SCGcSVSLFFiD7HDMfw). The workshop will also be streamed live on the museum’s Facebook page. “Stitching on the Light: A Virtual Stitch Along” is free and open to the public. For additional information, contact the Zwaanendael Museum via e-mail at zmuseum@delaware.gov or by telephone at 302-645-1148.

Photo of Zwaanendael Museum
Zwaanendael Museum

The Zwaanendael Museum was built in 1931 to commemorate the 300th anniversary of the state’s first European colony, Swanendael, established by the Dutch along Hoorn Kill (present-day Lewes-Rehoboth Canal) in 1631. Designed by E. William Martin (architect of Legislative Hall and the Hall of Records in Dover), the museum is modeled after the town hall in Hoorn, the Netherlands, and features a stepped facade gable with carved stonework and decorated shutters. The museum’s exhibits and presentations provide a showcase for Lewes-area maritime, military and social history.

The Zwaanendael Museum is administered by the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs, an agency of the State of Delaware. The division enhances Delaware’s quality of life by preserving the state’s unique historical heritage, fostering community stability and economic vitality and providing educational programs and assistance to the general public on Delaware history. The division’s diverse array of services includes operation of five museums which are accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, administration of the State Historic Preservation Office, conservation of the state’s archaeological and historic-objects collections, operation of a conference center and management of historic properties across the state. Primary funding for division programs and services is provided by annual appropriations from the Delaware General Assembly and grants from the National Park Service, Department of the Interior, a federal agency. However, the contents and opinions expressed in the division’s programs and services do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the Department of the Interior.
 

Picture of the Logo of the American Alliance of Museums logo

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Contact:
Jim Yurasek
Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs
Phone: 302-608-5326
E-mail: Jim.Yurasek@delaware.gov
Web: http://history.delaware.gov


Zwaanendael Museum Decorated For The Holidays

(DOVER, Del. — Dec. 4, 2020) — During the week of Nov. 30, 2020, the Rehoboth-Beach-based Sussex Gardeners completed the installation of outdoor and indoor holiday decorations at the Zwaanendael Museum, located at 102 Kings Highway in Lewes, Del. Based on the theme, “Lighting the Way,” this year’s decorations utilize plant material and holiday objects to illustrate various sources of light including lanterns, lightships, lighthouses, starlight and luminarias. The museum’s decorations are presented in conjunction with Lewes Lights, a community event in which the city’s residents decorate their home exteriors for the holiday season.

Photo of a Zwaanendael Museum bench decorated for the holidays by the Sussex Gardeners.
Zwaanendael Museum bench decorated for the holidays by the Sussex Gardeners.

 

Founded in 1937 as the Nassau Garden Committee, the 50-plus-member Sussex Gardeners brings together members of the community who have an interest in the fine art of gardening, landscape design, floral design and horticulture. The group’s community outreach includes programs in garden therapy, conservation and civic beautification.

Photo of members of the Sussex Gardeners preparing to decorate the Zwaanendael Museum for the holidays.
Members of the Sussex Gardeners preparing to decorate the Zwaanendael Museum for the holidays.

The Zwaanendael Museum was built in 1931 to commemorate the 300th anniversary of the state’s first European colony, Swanendael, established by the Dutch along Hoorn Kill (present-day Lewes-Rehoboth Canal) in 1631. Designed by E. William Martin (architect of Legislative Hall and the Hall of Records in Dover), the museum is modeled after the town hall in Hoorn, the Netherlands, and features a stepped facade gable with carved stonework and decorated shutters.

Photo of Zwaanendael Museum
Zwaanendael Museum

Museum exhibits and presentations provide a showcase for Lewes-area maritime, military and social history. Current exhibits include “Delaware Railroads: Elegant Travel and Timely Transport” which explores the history of rail travel and transport in the First State; and “A Seaborne Citizenry: The DeBraak and Its Atlantic World” which tells the story of His Majesty’s Sloop of War DeBraak, a British warship that sank off the Delaware coast on May 25, 1798.

The Zwaanendael Museum is open for free, 45-minute tours by reservation only from Wednesday through Saturday at 10 a.m., 11:15 a.m., 1:15 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. For additional information about visiting the museum, go to https://history.delaware.gov/p1-reopening-info or call 302-645-1148.

The Zwaanendael Museum is administered by the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs, an agency of the State of Delaware. The division enhances Delaware’s quality of life by preserving the state’s unique historical heritage, fostering community stability and economic vitality and providing educational programs and assistance to the general public on Delaware history. The division’s diverse array of services includes operation of five museums which are accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, administration of the State Historic Preservation Office, conservation of the state’s archaeological and historic-objects collections, operation of a conference center and management of historic properties across the state. Primary funding for division programs and services is provided by annual appropriations from the Delaware General Assembly and grants from the National Park Service, Department of the Interior, a federal agency. However, the contents and opinions expressed in the division’s programs and services do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the Department of the Interior.

 

Picture of the Logo of the American Alliance of Museums logo

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Contact:
Jim Yurasek
Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs
Phone: 302-608-5326
E-mail: Jim.Yurasek@delaware.gov
Web: http://history.delaware.gov