DNREC Division of Fish & Wildlife announces 2017/18 hunting photo contest winners

At the End of the Day
“At the End of the Day,” by Angela Garcia

DOVER – DNREC’s Division of Fish & Wildlife today announced the winning entries in the 2017/18 Delaware Hunting Photo Contest. First place was awarded to Angela Garcia of Smyrna for “At the End of the Day,” featuring her husband Paul and son Dominic on their boat during a hunting trip in Little Creek.

The second place winner was “Son and Father,” taken by F. Neil Dougherty, of Hockessin, showing family friends Dr. Dan Elliott and his son Joseph Elliott at the end of a successful hunt at Raymond Neck.

Entries receiving honorable mention were:

  • “Rehoboth Bay Ice Fog,” by Justyn Foth of Viola, featuring his uncles and friend hunting in Rehoboth Bay
  • “Patience is a Virtue,” by Charles Burton of Milton, featuring his Chesapeake Bay retriever Ruby Bay near Gordon’s Pond
  • “Tranquility,” by Taylor Deemer of Lewes, featuring Samantha Broadhurst with a kayak full of decoys at Collins Pond

Son and Father
“Son and Father,” by F. Neil Dougherty

The winning photo will appear on the cover and inside the 2018/2019 Delaware Hunting & Trapping Guide. The hunting guide will be available in July 2018 online, at the DNREC license desk in Dover and from hunting license agents statewide.

Three judges – Division of Fish & Wildlife Director David Saveikis, and local photographers Jesse Baird and Rebecca Hoover, both DNREC employees – reviewed the entries and narrowed them to the top five. Photographs were judged relative to the contest theme of “A Day Afield” and for composition and technical criteria.

“The Division’s annual hunting photo contest provides a great opportunity for hunters to capture and share their hunting experiences, which can inspire other hunters to enjoy, photograph, and share their hunting experiences in Delaware’s great outdoors,” said Director Saveikis.

Rehoboth Bay Ice Fog
“Rehoboth Bay Ice Fog,” by Justyn Foth

Patience is a Virtue
“Patience is a Virtue,” by Charles Burton

Tranquility
“Tranquility,” by Taylor Deemer

For more information about future Division of Fish & Wildlife photo contests, please visit de.gov/fwphotos, or contact Jennifer Childears at 302-739-9910, or email jennifer.childears@delaware.gov.

Media Contact: Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902


Delaware Conservation Districts announce annual conservation poster contest with entries due by Oct. 20

This year’s theme: ‘Healthy Soils Are Full of Life’ 

DOVER – The Kent, New Castle, and Sussex Conservation Districts are now accepting entries in their annual conservation poster contest for K-12 students in Delaware’s public, charter, private, or home schools. Posters will be judged on the 2017 theme, “Healthy Soils Are Full of Life,” in the following grade categories: K-1, 2-3, 4-6, 7-9, and 10-12. First, second and third place winners in each category will receive a cash prize of $50, $25, and $15, respectively. The state-level winning posters also will receive a cash award from the Delaware Association of Conservation Districts (DACD).

The deadline for poster entries is Friday, Oct. 20. In addition to regular posters, a special category for computer-generated posters is open to all high school students in grades 9-12 who take a graphics art/computer class or program of study. These entries will be judged at the county/state level only and will not be eligible for national judging.

Each Conservation District will submit first-place posters in each grade category for judging at the state level. In the event that an insufficient number of posters are received at the county level, county level judging will be eliminated and all posters will be judged at the state level. First-place posters in each grade level will be entered into the national conservation district poster contest, with winners to be displayed during the National Association of Conservation District’s conference in Nashville, Tenn., Jan. 27-31, 2018.

The student’s name, grade level, teacher, and school must be clearly and legibly printed on the back of the poster. Posters must be hand-delivered or mailed flat in time to the meet the deadline to the Conservation District office in the county in which the student resides. Addresses are as follows:

  • New Castle Conservation District, 2430 Old County Road, Newark, DE 19702
  • Kent Conservation District, 800 Bay Road, Suite 2, Dover, DE 19901
  • Sussex Conservation District, 21315 Berlin Road, Unit 4, Georgetown, DE 19947

The annual conservation poster contest provides students with an opportunity to convey their thoughts about soil, water, and related natural resource issues through art. It also highlights the educational outreach efforts of conservation districts and their state associations, auxiliaries, and agencies. The contest follows the annual stewardship theme developed and sponsored by the National Association of Conservation Districts.

“Healthy Soils Are Full of Life,” this year’s theme, reminds us of the important benefits that healthy and productive soils provide to us for food, fiber, habitat, and clean water. For more information and educational resources about the theme and poster contest guidelines, please visit http://www.nacdnet.org/general-resources/stewardship-and-education-materials/contests/.

For a flyer with Delaware’s poster contest guidelines, please visit www.newcastleconservationdistrict.org, www.kentcd.org or www.sussexconservation.org. For more information, please contact Rick Mickowski at 302-832-3100 ext. 8979, or by email at Rick.Mickowski@delaware.gov.

The annual poster contest is sponsored by DNREC and the Delaware Association of Conservation Districts. DNREC’s Division of Watershed Stewardship provides technical and financial assistance to Delaware’s farmers, landowners, and homeowners to protect and enhance the state’s soil and water resources, mainly through the Division’s Delaware Conservation Districts staff.

Vol. 47, No. 214

Contact: Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902


Submit your best hunting photos for Division of Fish & Wildlife’s hunting photo contest before Jan. 31 deadline

DOVER – Just one week remains to submit your best hunting photographs for the Delaware Division of Fish & Wildlife’s annual Delaware Hunting Photo Contest, which ends on Tuesday, Jan. 31. The winning photo will be featured on the cover or inside the 2017-2018 Delaware Hunting and Trapping Guide.

A judging panel comprised of DNREC staff will be looking for photos that best portray this year’s contest theme, “Hunting with Family or Friends.” Judges also will look at technical criteria including resolution, clarity and composition.

“The hunting photo contest is a great chance to showcase and share adventures with other hunters,” said Division of Fish & Wildlife Director David Saveikis. “The theme helps reinforce and capture the fun of a shared outdoor hunting experience.”

The contest is open to all Delaware residents, with a maximum of three entries per person. To be eligible, photographs must have been taken in Delaware. Portrait orientation is preferred; landscape photos, if chosen among contest winners, may be cropped for presentation.

Photographs must be submitted as 8×10-inch photo quality prints, with no frames or mats and no markings or signatures on the front or back. Winning entries must be available in a digital version with resolution of 300 dpi or greater when enlarged to 8×10 inches.

Normal processing of RAW image files, minimal cropping and minor adjustments to color and contrast are acceptable. HDR and focus stacking are permitted as long as manipulation is disclosed upon entry. Nothing should be added to the image or, aside from dust spots, taken away. The entrant must hold all rights to the photograph and must not infringe on the rights of any other person. Images that involve unlawful harm to wildlife or damage to the environment should not be submitted and will not be accepted. Entries will not be returned.

Entries may be mailed to the DNREC Division of Fish & Wildlife Photo Contest, Attention: Jennifer Childears, 89 Kings Highway, Dover, DE 19901. All entries must be postmarked or delivered by Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017, and must include a completed and signed entry form. A photo release form is also required for photos that include images of children younger than 18. Information and forms are available on the Division of Fish & Wildlife’s website or may be requested by calling Jennifer Childears at 302-739-9910, or email jennifer.childears@delaware.gov.

Media contact: Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902.

Vol. 47, No. 21

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Delaware Conservation Districts sponsor annual conservation poster contest with theme ‘We All Need Trees’

DOVER – The Kent, New Castle and Sussex Conservation Districts are now accepting entries in their annual conservation poster contest from K-12 students in public, charter, private or home schools. Posters will be judged on the 2016 theme, “We All Need Trees,” in the following grade categories: K-1, 2-3, 4-6, 7-9 and 10-12. First, second and third place winners in each category will receive a cash prize of $50, $25 and $15 respectively. The state-level winning posters also will receive a cash award from the Delaware Association of Conservation Districts (DACD).

The deadline for poster entries is Friday, Oct. 28. In addition to regular posters, a special category for computer-generated posters is open to all high school students in grades 9-12 who take a graphics art/computer class or program of study. These entries will be judged at the county/state level only and will not be eligible for national judging.

Each Conservation District will submit first-place posters in each grade category for judging at the state level. In the event that an insufficient number of posters are received at the county level, the county level judging will be eliminated and all posters will be judged at the state level. First-place posters in each grade level will be entered into the national conservation district poster contest, with winners to be displayed during the national conference in Denver, Colo., Jan. 28-Feb. 1, 2017.

The student’s name, grade level, teacher and school must be clearly and legibly printed on the back of the poster. Posters must be hand-delivered or mailed flat in time to the meet the deadline to the Conservation District office in the county in which the student resides. Addresses are as follows:

  • New Castle Conservation District, 2430 Old County Road, Newark, DE 19702
  • Kent Conservation District, 800 Bay Road, Suite 2, Dover, DE 19901
  • Sussex Conservation District, 21315 Berlin Road, Unit 4, Georgetown, DE 19947

The annual conservation poster contest provides students an opportunity to convey their thoughts about soil, water, and related natural resource issues through art. It also highlights the educational outreach efforts of conservation districts and their state associations, auxiliaries and agencies. The contest follows the annual stewardship theme developed and sponsored by the National Association of Conservation Districts.

“We All Need Trees,” this year’s theme, reminds us of the important benefits that trees provide for air, water, shelter, food, clothing and soil. For more information and educational resources about the theme and poster contest guidelines, please visit the National Association of Conservation Districts (NACD) website.

For a flyer with Delaware’s poster contest guidelines, please visit www.newcastleconservationdistrict.org, www.kentcd.org or www.sussexconservation.org. For more information, please contact Rick Mickowski at 302-832-3100 ext. 113, or by email at Rick.Mickowski@delaware.gov.

Media Contact: Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902

Vol. 46, No. 334


State Fairgoers vote Saint Thomas More Academy student’s artwork first-place winner in youth rain barrel painting contest

Saint Thomas More Academy Principal Rachael Casey
Governor Markell and Secretary Small with Saint Thomas More Academy Principal Rachael Casey, who accepted the award for Karen Scarangella.

HARRINGTON – Today at the Delaware State Fair, Governor Jack Markell, DNREC Secretary David Small and DNREC Division of Watershed Stewardship Director Acting Director Robert Palmer appraised the top entries in this year’s youth rain barrel painting contest before announcing the winning barrel, as voted by fairgoers this year, was “Tiki – H2O Progenitor,” painted by Kara Scarangella, a high school sophomore at St. Thomas More Academy, Magnolia.

Fairgoers had the opportunity to view the top five finalists’ painted barrels on display in the DNREC Building at the Fair, and to vote until Tuesday’s deadline for their favorite. All five barrels will remain on display until the fair closes Saturday, July 30. The other finalists were:

  • Second place: “Reign of the Sea,” by Sophia Birl, Savannah Stewart and Chloe Wilson of Delmarva Christian School, Georgetown
  • Third place: “Mrs. Minion,” by Rachel Santos of Phillip C. Showell Elementary, Selbyville
  • Fourth place: “United States of Water,” by fourth graders Alec Ciesinski, Owen Reazor and Alex Ozor of Maclary Elementary School, Newark
  • Fifth place: “Nature Preservers,” by fourth graders Jordan Short, Katrina Endres, Ella Baldwin and Olivia Kessler of Maclary Elementary School, Newark

Also recognized was the grand prize winner in the adult rain barrel painting contest, Nathan Zimmerman of Milton, a construction reviewer with DNREC’s Sediment and Stormwater program. His barrel, “Early to Rise at Sundown,” which depicts a barred owl perched over water, will be placed at Woodburn, the Governor’s Residence in Dover.

DNREC sponsored the two rain barrel painting contests to educate the community on the benefits of using rain barrels to reduce rainwater runoff and improve water quality. Ten youth participants and 10 adult participants were chosen for the contests based on their applications, design ideas and site placements. Individuals or groups chosen each received a fully-assembled, primed 55-gallon plastic barrel, topcoat and bubble wrap; they supplied their own paint, brushes and other materials or tools. They then had five weeks to finish their artistry and submit final photographs and information, as well as a short biography of themselves.

As part of the program, each selected individual or group is required to find a public home for their finished rain barrel. Placement can be at a school, with a nonprofit organization, church, municipal building, or other public location.

For more information about the rain barrel painting contests, including photos of the entries, please click 2016 Rain Barrel Art Contest. For more information on the contests, please email Sara Wozniak or call 302-382-0335.

What is a Rain Barrel? A rain barrel is a container that collects and stores the water from roofs and downspouts for future uses such as watering lawns, gardens, and house plants; cleaning off gardening tools; and washing your car. Rain barrels help lower your water bills, particularly in the summer months by collecting thousands of gallons of water a year. Rain barrels are also important for our environment because they help reduce water pollution by decreasing the amount of stormwater runoff reaching our streams and rivers. An average rainfall of one inch within a 24-hour period can produce more than 700 gallons of water that run off a typical house. Such stormwater runoff picks up anything on the ground such as litter, excess fertilizer, pet waste, and motor oil, transporting it to storm drains that dump the untreated water directly into our waterways.

Media Contact: Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902

Vol. 46, No. 276