Two wells near Dover AFB have possible elevated PFOS/PFOA levels

DNREC, EPA told results from USAF sampling are not yet validated

Dover, Del. – The U.S. Air Force (USAF) and Dover Air Force Base (AFB) notified Delaware’s Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) that preliminary (i.e., not yet validated) results show two wells on separate properties near the base have possible elevated levels of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). The preliminary results indicate concentrations above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s lifetime health advisory for these substances of 70 parts per trillion (ppt).

The preliminary, unvalidated results for these two wells are in addition to validated detections of PFOS and PFOA for four wells announced in July 2019. The USAF continues to provide alternative water supply to those properties. The Delaware Division of Public Health (DPH) is working with DNREC, USAF, Dover AFB, and the owners of the affected wells to protect public health. The owners of the two wells, who each provide water to a single commercial business, have been notified and provided with bottled water by Dover AFB.

The unvalidated results of water samples recently collected by the USAF from ten other wells reported PFOS and PFOA below the federal health advisory level. Although the recent test results are unvalidated at this time, validation of the data is expected within 30 days.

PFOS and PFOA are part of a group of synthetic chemicals known as perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) used in a variety of products that over time have become widely distributed in the environment. These chemicals have been found at Dover AFB and other air bases and airports in firefighting foam. The USAF and EPA have been working with DNREC and DPH to determine the impacts of PFOS and PFOA on private wells in proximity to the base.

A USAF fact sheet about the Dover AFB PFOS and PFOA sampling published in spring 2019 indicated that groundwater samples collected in shallow monitoring wells on the base also showed levels of PFOS and PFOA above EPA’s 70 ppt health advisory.

No PFOS or PFOA have been detected in five nearby municipal water wells tested by Dover AFB’s water supplier, Tidewater Utilities. Tidewater sampled four on-base municipal supply wells and the off-base municipal supply well nearest the base. All these wells draw water from a deep, confined aquifer. There were no PFOS or PFOA detections in any of them.

The primary step necessary to protect the public’s health from exposure to PFOS and PFOA in drinking water is to use an alternate water source until a permanent solution can be determined, which may consist of treatment, connecting to a new system, or other solution. DPH encourages the impacted businesses, office building, and dwellings in the affected area to use the bottled water provided by the DAFB until a permanent solution is in place. Anyone with specific health concerns or questions about potential health impacts is encouraged to contact their primary care provider. General questions about the health effects from, and exposure to, PFAS can call DPH at 302-744-4546.

At this time, there is no federal or state required standard for PFAS substances in drinking water supplies, so actions taken are based on the federal lifetime health advisory level.

For more information, please contact:
436th Airlift Wing, Public Affairs
Cell Phone: 302-363-9006 or 302-677-3372.
Email: 436AW.PA@us.af.mil

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USAF, Dover AFB advise state agencies that PFAS chemicals exceeding EPA health advisory found in four wells near base

DOVER – The US Air Force and Dover Air Force Base have notified Delaware’s Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control and Division of Public Health that four wells near the base sampled by the federal government for perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), including perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), have returned elevated levels of PFOS and PFOA above the US Environmental Protection Agency’s health advisory for these substances of 70 parts per trillion (ppt).

Because of the elevated PFOS and PFOA levels, the owners of the four wells – which provide water to a shopping center with five businesses, two residences, and an office building – have been notified and provided with bottled water by Dover AFB. PFOS and PFOA are chemicals used in a variety of products that over time have become widely distributed in the environment – and have been found at Dover AFB and other air bases and airports in firefighting foam. The USAF and EPA have been working with DNREC and DPH to determine the impacts of PFOS and PFOA on private wells in proximity to the base.

A USAF fact sheet about the Dover AFB PFOS and PFOA sampling published in late spring said that groundwater samples collected in shallow monitoring wells on the base showed levels of PFOS and PFOA above EPA’s 70 ppt health advisory. “Based on these results, actions have been undertaken to ensure that drinking water at DAFB and the surrounding community is not impacted,” the fact sheet noted.

No PFOS or PFOA were detected in five nearby municipal water wells tested sampled in November 2014 by Dover AFB’s water supplier, Tidewater Utilities. Tidewater sampled four on-base municipal supply wells and the off-base municipal supply well nearest the base. All of these wells draw water from a deep, confined aquifer, and there were no PFOS or PFOA detections in any of them.

Representatives from the USAF this year then began contacting owners and users of private or commercial wells on properties near the northwest and east boundaries of Dover AFB, and asking permission to take drinking water samples. The four private wells that returned elevated levels of PFOS and PFOA on July 12 are located along those boundaries.

The primary step necessary to protect the public’s health from exposure to PFOS and PFOA in drinking water is to use an alternate water source until a permanent solution can be determined, which may consist of treatment, connecting to a new system, or other solution. DPH encourages the impacted businesses, office building, and dwellings in the affected area to use the bottled water provided by the DAFB until a permanent solution is in place. Anyone with specific health concerns or questions about potential health impacts is encouraged to contact their primary care provider. General questions about health effects from, and exposure to PFAS can call DPH at 302-744-4546.

For more information, please contact:
436th Airlift Wing, Public Affairs
Cell Phone: 302-363-9006 or 302-677-3372.
Email: 436AW.PA@us.af.mil

Vol. 49, No. 193

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Dover Bridge Named in Honor of Senior Airman Elizabeth Loncki

Today, Governor John Carney, Delaware Department of Transportation Secretary Jennifer Cohan, Delaware’s congressional delegation, and military and veterans’ leaders gathered at Dover Air Force Base to dedicate the bridge over Route 1, between DAFB and base housing, to Elizabeth Loncki, the first Delaware woman killed in Operation Iraqi Freedom. This Sunday, October 14, would be Senior Airman Loncki’s 35th birthday.

Senior Airman Loncki, 23, died on Jan. 7, 2007, after her explosive ordnance disposal team was targeted by a car bomber near Baghdad, Iraq. Loncki, a New Castle native, attended St. Peter the Apostle grade school and graduated from Padua Academy in Wilmington in 2001. She briefly attended the University of Arizona before enlisting in the Air Force.

“Today we are honoring Elizabeth Loncki-a Delaware hero who made the ultimate sacrifice while serving her country,” said Governor Carney. “I am humbled by the sacrifices made by our men and women in uniform who selflessly go into harm’s way to protect us here and abroad. We are proud of all those who have served, and for the many sacrifices made by our active duty and reserve members, our veterans, and their families, in order to preserve our freedoms.”

U.S. Sen. Tom Carper, a 23-year veteran of the U.S. Navy, said, “I am honored to be a part of the naming of this bridge for Senior Airman Elizabeth Loncki, who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our country. We owe our servicemen and women a debt of gratitude, and now the thousands of motorists who travel up and down Route 1 for work, school, and to reach their vacation destinations will have the important reminder that they are free to do all of those things because of the sacrifice of service members like Elizabeth Loncki.”

“Today is a wonderful opportunity to remember the ultimate sacrifice that Sr. Airman Elizabeth Loncki made for her country,” stated U.S. Sen. Chris Coons. “The bridge will be a reminder to all who travel it of Liz’s memory, her dedication to her profession, and her unconditional love of country and while today’s dedication is a fitting tribute, there are other ways we can honor Liz’s memory, such as answering the challenges our veterans face, ensuring they have the resources, the treatment, and the support they have earned and deserve including strengthening mental health and employment services.”

“In January 2007, 23-year-old Senior Airman Elizabeth Loncki made the ultimate sacrifice for her brothers and sisters in arms, her family, and her country,” U.S. Rep. Lisa Blunt Rochester said. “This bridge is much more than just concrete and steel. It serves as a reminder of Elizabeth’s bravery and willingness to answer a calling higher than herself. With the dedication of this memorial, her memory and spirit will live on.”

Secretary of Transportation Jennifer Cohan added,”Elizabeth Loncki was a brave young woman who sacrificed her life in service to her country, and DelDOT is grateful to have the opportunity to name this bridge in her honor. Elizabeth’s dedication to the greater good is something that we should all strive to emulate, and we hope that this bridge will serve as a lasting testimony to her values.”

“We are honored to share in dedicating the bridge, which most of us use on a daily basis, to the honor and memory of Senior Airman Elizabeth Loncki,” said Colonel Joel Safranek, commander of the 436th Airlift Wing, Dover Air Force Base. “She made the ultimate sacrifice for her country, and it is only fitting to have this memorial here at Dover where we return our fallen service members with dignity, honor and respect. I am grateful to be part of this and pleased to see the project come to completion.”

“Senior Airman Elizabeth Loncki was competitive, battling stereotypes to prove she belonged in a male dominated career (explosive ordinances),” said Larence Kirby, executive director of the Delaware Commission of Veterans Affairs. “She was brave beyond words, performing duties that few can envision. When she return from disarming explosives, we deployers thanked God for her safety and understood her efforts kept us safe. When we lost her to a violent enemy, we prayed for her soul internalizing the significance of her sacrifice, knowing she did so willingly in defense of our nation.”

Staff Sergeant Johny Hargove, who proposed the idea for naming the bridge for Elizabeth Loncki, remarked, “I would like to thank the Congressional Delegation, Governor Carney, Secretary Cohan, Mayor Christiansen and all of the Representatives for being here on this worthwhile occasion. It is certain that we all have one thing in common today and that is our admiration for Senior Airman Liz Loncki. I can’t think of a better way to be reminded of her sacrifice than to see her name memorialized on this bridge. Thank you to all who made this possible. It gives me great privilege to be on the team that brought this to fruition.”


U.S. Senator Thomas R. Carper celebrates “Delaware Arbor Day” at Dover Air Force Base

U.S. Senator Thomas R. Carper helped plant an American holly tree at Dover Air Force Base to commemorate Arbor Day in the First State. (photo by John Petersen, Delaware Forest Service).
U.S. Senator Thomas R. Carper helped plant an American holly tree at Dover Air Force Base to commemorate Arbor Day in the First State. (photo by John Petersen, Delaware Forest Service).

DOVER, Del. – U.S. Senator Thomas R. Carper joined public officials and schoolchildren to observe “Delaware Arbor Day” at Dover Air Force Base, which celebrated its 25th Year as a Tree City USA. The last Friday in April is commemorated as Arbor Day in the First State, an occasion to encourage tree planting and highlight the numerous benefits that trees provide: cleaner air and water, natural beauty, valuable wood products and food, reduced storm water runoff, and improved property values. The ceremony also honored the winners of the Delaware Forest Service’s annual school poster contest and included a ceremonial tree planting of an American holly (Ilex opaca), Delaware’s state tree. Alaina Stecher, a fifth-grader at Christ the Teacher School in Newark, is the statewide winner of the Delaware Forest Service’s annual Arbor Day School Poster Contest. This year’s theme was “Trees are terrific… from acorn to oak!”  The complete gallery of winning posters (with links to hi-res images) is at http://delawaretrees.com/2017arbordaypostercontest

Established by J. Sterling Morton in Nebraska on April 10, 1872, it is estimated that one million trees were planted on the very first Arbor Day.

Additional photos of the event can be found at the Delaware Forest Service’s Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/delforestservice.

Col. Randy Boswell, 436th Mission Support Group commander, holds the Tree City USA flag with Master Sgt. Donald Bourne, 736th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron airframe powerplant general section chief, and his family April 28, 2017, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Bourne's daughter, Audriana, won the Kindergarten-level for Kent County in an Arbor Day poster contest. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Zachary Cacicia)
Col. Randy Boswell, 436th Mission Support Group commander, holds the 25th Year Tree City USA flag with Master Sgt. Donald Bourne, 736th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron airframe powerplant general section chief, and his family April 28, 2017, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Bourne’s daughter, Audriana, won the Kindergarten-level for Kent County in an Arbor Day poster contest. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Zachary Cacicia)

10_nc_5_alaina-stecher_christ-the-teacher
This poster by fifth-grader Alaina Stecher of Christ the Teacher School in Newark is the winner of the Delaware Forest Service’s annual Arbor Day Poster Contest.

Statewide winner Alaina Stecher with (from left) Commander Randy Boswell, Dover Mayor Robin Christiansen, Delaware Agriculture Secretary Michael Scuse, and U.S. Senator Thomas Carper.
Statewide winner Alaina Stecher with (from left) Col. Randy Boswell, Dover Mayor Robin Christiansen, Delaware Agriculture Secretary Michael Scuse, and U.S. Senator Thomas Carper. (photo by John Petersen, Delaware Forest Service)

 

The annual school poster contest is open to all K-5 public, private, and charter schools as well as other organized youth groups and after-school programs. A total of 126 classrooms from 40 schools participated in this year’s contest, with 3,647 students creating original posters. Winners were selected from each county in the following grade categories: K, 1 & 2, 3 & 4, and 5. Judging criteria were: originality, use of theme, neatness, and artistic expression. Each winner receives a tree-themed book and a print reproduction of their poster on fine art canvas. Thanks to corporate sponsor Delmarva Power, a free tree planting ceremony will also be held at each winner’s school. In addition, every participating classroom receives free pine seedlings for all participants. This year, students from the Middletown High School FFA Chapter and senior volunteers from the Modern Maturity Center in Dover wrapped thousands of seedlings for schoolchildren statewide.

This year’s poster contest winners were:

New Castle County

Kindergarten: Emily Najera  — Robert S. Gallaher  Elementary, Newark

Grades 1-2: Amy Tang — Jennie Smith Elementary, New Castle

Grades 3-4: John Chacko —  Christ the Teacher School, Newark

Grade 5:  Alaina Stecher  — Christ the Teacher School, Newark

Kent County

Kindergarten Audriana Bourne  — Major George Welch Elementary, Dover

Grades 1-2: Isabelle Kim —   WB Simpson Elementary, Wyoming

Grade 3-4: Haley Holderman— WB Simpson Elementary, Wyoming

Grade 5: Hailey McCutchan —  Clayton Intermediate School, Clayton

Sussex County

Kindergarten: Maryia Dorakhava —  Rehoboth Elementary, Rehoboth

Grades 1-2: Shannon Scudder —  Lord Baltimore Elementary, Ocean View

Grades 3-4: Amelia Meyer —  Southern Delaware School of Arts, Selbyville

Grade 5: Samuel Winston  —  Winston Learning Academy, Milford

 

 

 


Los Efectos de la Guerra Fría en la Base Aérea de Dover y las Comunidad Vecinas

El gobernador Carvel (izquierda) bautizando el “Diamond State Tanker” con el sargento (en inglés Staff Sgt.) Goodin en el Día de las Fuerzas Armadas en la Base Aérea de Dover el 25 de mayo de 1961.
El gobernador Carvel (izquierda) bautizando el “Diamond State Tanker” con el sargento (en inglés Staff Sgt.) Goodin en el Día de las Fuerzas Armadas en la Base Aérea de Dover el 25 de mayo de 1961.

La Base Aérea de Dover ha sido la piedra angular de Dover, Delaware por más de 60 años. Poco se sabe del impacto que tuvo la base en las comunidades a su alrededor. El sábado 6 de agosto a las 10:30 a.m. Eric Czerwinski, sargento maestro retirado de la Fuerza Aérea de los Estados Unidos, hará una presentación en los Archivos Públicos de Delaware sobre la influencia de la Base Aérea de Dover en el crecimiento del área durante la época posterior a la Segunda Guerra Mundial. El desarrollo de Dover y Camden fue inmensamente afectado por el crecimiento de la Base de Dover durante los años de la Guerra Fría. La necesidad de alojar a los soldados y civiles fue la fuerza que guio el desarrollo en estas comunidades. Se vieron nuevas subdivisiones de terrenos en todas partes y por primera vez el enfoque comercial inició su travesía desde el centro a la franja del centro comercial. Esta presentación revelará cómo el crecimiento de la Base de Dover durante el periodo de la Guerra Fría de los años cincuenta cambió la imagen del Condado de Kent permanentemente.

Eric Czerwinski se retire de las Fuerza Aérea de los Estados Unidos como sargento maestro después de 20 años de servicio. Obtuvo su licenciatura en historia del Wesley College y completó su maestría en preservación histórica en la Universidad Estatal de Delaware en el 2013. Actualmente sirve como instructor adjunto de historia en el Wesley College.

Este es un evento gratuito, completamente en inglés y no necesita reservaciones. Los Archivos Públicos de Delaware están ubicados en el 121 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard North en Dover. La sala de investigación Mabel Lloyd Ridgely está abierta al público de lunes a viernes en horario de 8 a.m. a 4:15 p.m. El segundo sábado de cada mes, la sala de investigación está abierta de 9 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.


Los Archivos de Delaware (DPA por su nombre en inglés, archives.delaware.gov, es una agencia del Estado de Delaware y es uno de los programas de archivo más antiguos en los Estados Unidos. DPA sirve a los residentes de Delaware identificando, coleccionando y preservando los registros públicos de evidente valor histórico; asegurando el acceso a los registros públicos para las generaciones presentes y futuras; y educando a los interesados en la creación, manejo, uso y preservación de los registros públicos.