Wastewater, Surface Water and Drinking Water Planning Grant Proposals Now Being Accepted by DNREC, DPH

State government agencies, county and municipal governments, and conservation districts can now submit proposals to DNREC and the Delaware Division of Public Health to receive matching grants for wastewater, surface water and drinking water project planning. Proposals must be received by 4:30 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020.

Eligible projects include planning, preliminary engineering and feasibility analysis of wastewater and/or drinking water projects; stormwater retrofits; green technology practices; stream and wetland restoration projects; small watershed studies; master surface water and drainage plans; and other source water pollution control projects.

Grant applications of up to $50,000 will be considered with a one-to-one cash match requirement. Up to 10 percent of the grant funds may be used for administrative costs. There is an annual cumulative grant award cap of $100,000 per successful applicant per fiscal year for wastewater and surface water planning grants. Drinking water planning grants can be for any amount, provided funds are available.

The Wastewater, Drinking Water, and Surface Water Matching Planning Grant programs are set-asides in the state’s Clean Water and Drinking Water Revolving Fund. Projects will be recommended for funding by the Delaware Water Infrastructure Advisory Council (WIAC) through a competitive grant process.

  • Wastewater Planning Grants assist with wastewater infrastructure project planning and design necessary to submit a loan application for funding consideration. For project guidelines and an application, visit Wastewater Matching Planning Grant.
  • Surface Water Planning Grants support projects and activities that focus on reducing surface water runoff and improving water quality in impaired watersheds. For project guidelines and an application, visit Surface Water Matching Planning Grant.
  • Drinking Water Planning Grants help municipal water systems prepare for large, often-costly projects such as troubleshooting source water quality and proposing solutions, reconfiguring water plants to optimize treatment, and determining water main size and locations, among other activities. For project guidelines and an application, visit Drinking Water Matching Planning Grant.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. The Division of Watershed Stewardship develops and implements innovative watershed assessment, monitoring and implementation activities. For more information, visit the website and connect with DNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov; Nikki Lavoie, nikki.lavoie@delaware.gov

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DPH to Hold Public Workshop On Solicitation of Water Infrastructure Improvement Projects

DOVER – The Division of Public Health’s Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) will host a public workshop Thursday, Feb. 20, 2020, to present and discuss the Assistance for Small and Disadvantaged Communities Drinking Water Grant, authorized under the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act. The workshop begins at 9:00 a.m., and will be held at the Edgehill Shopping Center, 43 South DuPont Highway, Dover, DE 19904.

The grant program’s objective is to assist public water systems in underserved, small and disadvantaged communities in meeting Safe Drinking Water Act requirements. Workshop participants will learn about the funding opportunity, state and federal requirements, eligible projects, and the competitive grant application process.

Eligible activities for assistance include:
• Investments necessary for a public water system in a small, disadvantaged, or underserved community to return to compliance with the Safe Drinking Water Act
• Efforts that benefit a disadvantaged community on a per household basis
• Programs to provide household water quality testing, including testing for unregulated contaminants
• Activities necessary and appropriate for a state to respond to a contaminant

Small or disadvantaged communities are defined as communities with populations of less than 10,000 individuals, or communities that do not have the capacity to incur debt sufficient to finance a project or eligible activity and may become disadvantaged as a result of carrying out an eligible activity.

Grant applications of up to $609,000 will be considered. Projects will be solicited starting February 20, 2020, and are due by March 31, 2020.

For more information about the workshop or the grant, contact Heather Warren, Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Administrator, at 302-744-4739, or visit https://www.epa.gov/dwcapacity/wiin-grant-assistance-small-and-disadvantaged-communities-drinking-water-grant.

A person who is deaf, hard-of-hearing, deaf-blind or speech-disabled can call the DPH phone number above by using TTY services. Dial 7-1-1 or 800-232-5460 to type your conversation to a relay operator, who reads your conversation to a hearing person at DPH. The relay operator types the hearing person’s spoken words back to the TTY user. To learn more about TTY availability in Delaware, visit http://delawarerelay.com.

The Department of Health and Social Services is committed to improving the quality of the lives of Delaware’s citizens by promoting health and well-being, fostering self-sufficiency, and protecting vulnerable populations. DPH, a division of DHSS, urges Delawareans to make healthier choices with the 5-2-1 Almost None campaign: eat 5 or more fruits and vegetables each day, have no more than 2 hours of recreational screen time each day (includes TV, computer, gaming), get 1 or more hours of physical activity each day, and drink almost no sugary beverages.


DNREC, Division of Public Health accepting proposals for wastewater, surface water, and drinking water planning grants

DOVER – The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, along with the Delaware Division of Public Health, are now accepting project proposals from state, county and municipal governments, and conservation districts for matching grants for wastewater, surface water, and drinking water project planning. Proposals must be received by 4:30 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 22.

Eligible projects include planning, preliminary engineering, and feasibility analysis of wastewater and/or drinking water projects; stormwater retrofits; green technology practices; stream and wetland restoration projects; small watershed studies; master surface water and drainage plans; and other source water pollution control projects.

Wastewater Planning Grants assist with wastewater infrastructure project planning and design necessary to submit a loan application for funding consideration. Surface Water Planning Grants support projects and activities that focus on reducing surface water runoff and improving water quality in impaired watersheds. Drinking Water Planning Grants help municipal water systems prepare for large, often-costly projects such as troubleshooting source water quality and proposing solutions, reconfiguring water plants to optimize treatment, and determining water main size and locations, among other activities.

Grant applications of up to $50,000 will be considered with a one-to-one cash match requirement. Up to 10 percent of the grant funds may be used for administrative costs. There is an annual cumulative grant award cap of $100,000 per successful applicant per fiscal year for wastewater and surface water planning grants. Drinking water planning grants can be for any amount, provided funds are available.

The Wastewater, Drinking Water, and Surface Water Matching Planning Grant programs are set-asides in the state’s Clean Water and Drinking Water Revolving Funds. Projects will be recommended for funding by the Delaware Water Infrastructure Advisory Council (WIAC) through a competitive grant process.

For a Wastewater Matching Planning Grant, the project guidelines and the application can be found online at Wastewater Matching Planning Grant. For a Surface Water Matching Planning Grant, the project guidelines and the application can be found online at Surface Water Matching Planning Grant. Proposals must be submitted by email, sized less than 10 MB, to James.Sullivan@delaware.gov.

For a Drinking Water Matching Planning Grant, the project guidelines and the application can be found online at Drinking Water Matching Planning Grant. Proposals must be submitted by email, sized less than 10 MB, to Heather.Warren@delaware.gov.

Media contact: Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902.

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FY2020 Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund public workshop Jan. 6 by DNREC Environmental Finance

DOVER – Environmental Finance within DNREC’s Office of the Secretary and the Delaware Division of Public Health will host a State Revolving Loan Fund public workshop Monday, Jan. 6, 2020, in preparation for the development of the 2020 Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) and Drinking Water State Revolving (DWSRF) Project Priority Lists. The workshop begins at 10 a.m. in the Kent County Administrative Complex, Conference Room 220, 555 S. Bay Road, Dover, DE 19901.

The workshop will inform and provide municipal government representatives, privately-owned businesses, wastewater and drinking water utilities, consultant engineers, and other interested parties with detailed overviews of the CWSRF and DWSRF programs. The combined-program workshop will provide attendees with an accurate and efficient source of information for requesting financial assistance for wastewater and drinking water infrastructure project needs.

Notices-of-Intent (NOI) for wastewater, drinking water, stormwater, and related infrastructure projects will be solicited starting Monday, January 6, 2020, and are due by Friday, Jan. 31, 2020, to prepare the 2020 CWSRF and DWSRF Project Priority Lists (PPLs). Projects must be listed on the CWSRF and DWSRF PPLs, respectively, to be considered for funding. Workshop attendance is required by applicants and/or their consulting engineering firms who plan to apply for CWSRF and DWSRF assistance.

Workshop participants will learn about the following CWSRF and DWSRF program changes and infrastructure financing tools:

  • One-stop loan application process for wastewater and drinking water infrastructure project assistance
  • Land conservation and water quality improvement loan sponsorship programs
  • Source water protection loans for drinking water supplies
  • Wastewater, drinking water, and stormwater facilities matching planning grants
  • Community water quality improvement grants
  • Asset management plan development incentives
  • Project planning advances
  • Expanded eligibilities for privately-owned businesses

In addition, detailed information will be presented at the workshop about how and when to submit projects for funding consideration, project ranking criteria, project construction requirements, and how to apply for infrastructure planning grants.

To reserve a place at the workshop, please contact Laura Rafferty, DNREC Environmental Finance, by emailing Laura.Rafferty@delaware.gov or phone: 302-739-9941.

Contact: Michael Globetti, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902


DNREC announces release of preliminary data from USGS unconfined aquifer water quality study

DOVER – The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control’s Division of Water today announced the release of preliminary data from the ongoing United States Geological Survey (USGS) unconfined aquifer water quality study in Delaware.

The USGS is in the process of completing the third in a series of ongoing studies conducted over the past 20 years. These studies focused on the ground water quality in a selection of public water systems statewide. Started in 2000, the USGS studies have been designed to assess existing raw-water quality relative to established drinking water standards and emerging interests. In each iteration, the study has included analytes beyond the standard regulatory scope with the addition of per- and poly-fluorinated substances (PFAS) in the current effort.

Consistent with the previous studies, specific compounds were detected above standards at a few locations. DNREC’s review of this preliminary data indicates that overall water quality in the State of Delaware is generally good in respect to the broad suite of compounds detected. PFAS were detected in isolated locations which shows similar distribution to other emerging compounds in the past. Of the 30 sampling locations, PFAS was identified in the unconfined aquifer water above the current Federal Health Advisory Limit (HAL) of 70 parts per trillion in only two isolated locations. In both instances, DNREC, in conjunction with the Department of Health and Social Service’s Office of Drinking Water (DHSS-ODW), and the water providers, confirmed that treated water quality meets the drinking water standards, including the unregulated compounds. While the sampling was done at locations of public wells, the USGS results reflect unconfined aquifer water prior to any treatment supplied by water utilities, and do not reflect served water quality.

While the USGS is in the process of finalizing the report, verified preliminary data can now be accessed by the public through the National Water Information System (NWIS). It is anticipated that the USGS study summarizing the results of their analysis of over 500 compounds will be completed in the spring of 2020. This data, in comparison with the results from the 2000 and 2008 studies, will provide a detailed baseline of water quality in the unconfined aquifer throughout the state that can be used by DNREC and partnering agencies in making water resource management decisions.

CONTACT: Michael Globetti or Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902

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