State Seeks Sponsors For Child and Adult Care Food Program

The Delaware Department of Education is seeking sponsors for the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulates the program, which is managed locally by the Delaware Department of Education.   Sponsors in CACFP can receive reimbursement for meals served in compliance with program regulations at qualifying child care centers, adult day care centers, emergency shelters, family day care homes and afterschool programs.  Sponsors may be reimbursed for up to two meals and one snack, or two snacks and one meal, per participant each day.  Participant eligibility is tied to income eligibility guidelines that are adjusted annually by the USDA.  The current eligibility guidelines are as follows:

FOR USE BY CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM

INCOME ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR REDUCED PRICE MEALS

Effective Date:  July 1, 2021 – June 30, 2022

These are the income scales used by Child Nutrition Programs to determine eligibility for free and reduced price meals.

 

FREE MEALS – 130% REDUCED MEALS – 185%
 

Household

Size

 

Yearly

 

Monthly

Twice

per

Month

 

Every  two weeks

 

Weekly

 

Yearly

 

Monthly

Twice

per

Month

 

Every  two weeks

 

Weekly

1 $16,744 $1,396 $698 $644 $322 $23,828 $1,986 $993 $917 $459
2 $22,646 $1,888 $944 $871 $436 $32,227 $2,686 $1,343 $1,240 $620
3 $28,548 $2,379 $1,190 $1,098 $549 $40,626 $3,386 $1,693 $1,563 $782
4 $34,450 $2,871 $1,436 $1,325 $663 $49,025 $4,086 $2,043 $1,886 $943
5 $40,352 $3,363 $1,682 $1,552 $776 $57,424 $4,786 $2,393 $2,209 $1,105
6 $46,254 $3,855 $1,928 $1,779 $890 $65,823 $5,486 $2,743 $2,532 $1,266
7 $52,156 $4,347 $2,174 $2,006 $1,003 $74,222 $6,186 $3,093 $2,855 $1,428
8 $58,058 $4,839 $2,420 $2,233 $1,117 $82,621 $6,886 $3,443 $3,178 $1,589
For each additional household member, add:  

 

$5,902

 

 

$492

 

 

$246

 

 

$227

 

 

$114

 

 

$8,399

 

 

$700

 

 

$350

 

 

$324

 

 

$162

 

Conversion Factors: Conversion is required if there are multiple income sources with more than one frequency (Example: a ‘monthly’ Social Security check and a ‘weekly’ wage stub), the participating agency must annualize all income by multiplying: Weekly income by 52; Bi-weekly income (received every two weeks) by 26; Semi-monthly income (received twice a month) by 24; Monthly income by 12

For more information please call the Delaware Department of Education Nutrition Office at (302) 857-3356.

                                                                                                                                                                       

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits.  Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339.  Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at: http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

(1)   mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture

Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights

1400 Independence Avenue, SW

Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;

(2)   fax: (202) 690-7442; or

(3)   email: program.intake@usda.gov.

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

 


Free school meals to continue in upcoming academic year

Delaware K-12 schools will have the option to continue offering free nutritious school meals during the 2021-2022 school year, the Delaware Department of Education (DDOE) announced today.  The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food & Nutrition Services (FNS) released a group of waivers and eligibility guidelines allowing schools to offer meals without determining eligibility based on the student’s household income.

 

Participating schools can operate under the Seamless Summer Option (SSO) and will receive a higher federal reimbursement rate per meal.

 

Schools that elect not to serve free meals through the SSO will determine eligibility for free and reduced-price meals through the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) using federal income guidelines. The annually updated income eligibility guidelines for the 2021-22 school year have been released by the USDA.

 

The new eligibility guidelines went into effect July 1, 2021 and allow schools and other institutions and facilities to determine eligibility for the NSLP, the School Breakfast Program, the Special Milk Program for Children, the Child and Adult Care Food Program, the Summer Food Service Program, and the Pandemic Electronic Benefit Transfer.

 

To apply, households already receiving benefits from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) need only include the SNAP or TANF case number on their application if not notified of their automatic eligibility by the school. Households enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) may qualify for free or reduced-price school meals and should complete a Household Meal Benefit Application. Households should contact the school nutrition program of the district or school where their child(ren) attends school for further information.

 

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

 

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g., Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

 

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at: http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

 

(1)     mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture

                  Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights

                  1400 Independence Avenue, SW

                  Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;

(2)     fax: (202) 690-7442; or

(3)     email: program.intake@usda.gov.

 

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

 

Media contact: Alison May, alison.may@doe.k12.de.us, 302-735-4006


Delaware Farmers’ Markets To Open Under New COVID-19 Protocols

DOVER, Del. – With the assistance of the Delaware Farmers’ Market Coalition, a group of market managers from across the state, the Delaware Department of Agriculture (DDA) is issuing protocols to help farmers’ markets safely begin opening starting May 15.

“We want to make sure that opening the farmers’ markets in Delaware is done in a way that maximizes the safety of market staff, family farmers, and the customers who are looking to purchase produce, specialty crops, and other value-added food items,” said Secretary of Agriculture Michael T. Scuse. “We know a lot more about COVID-19 now and the steps we all need to take to prevent the spread of this disease. Farmers’ markets will not be the same social experience as they were prior to COVID-19, but we hope that Delawareans will utilize the markets as a place to purchase locally produced food.”

The protocols issued by DDA will be in place until further notice and are solely intended to allow farmers to sell produce, specialty crops, and other value-added food items that have been directly grown or raised on a farm or prepared in a permitted on-farm kitchen or cottage-food kitchen. Individual farmers’ markets may choose to implement more specific and stringent protocols, but they must at a minimum follow the issued protocols in order to operate and remain open.

“There is nothing better than heading to a farmers’ market in the spring as Delaware grown produce starts to become available. There is a sense of community pride around farmers’ markets that includes supporting our local economy and our family farms,” said Governor John Carney. “With the help of the farmers’ market managers and the staff at the Department of Agriculture and the Delaware Division of Public Health, we are able to allow farmers’ markets to begin opening on May 15 as long as they are able to enact the protocols issued by the Department of Agriculture.”

To create a safer environment for all involved in farmers’ markets, they will no longer be considered a social venue. This means there will be no social gatherings, no entertainment shows or activities, no food trucks or prepared food for consumption on site, no on-site food preparation or sampling, no demonstrations, and no pets allowed, except for service animals.

Depending on the farmers’ market, they may operate a walk-through market or a drive-through market. All customers will be required to wear face coverings, or they will be denied entrance. A maximum of two people per household will be allowed to enter the market to shop. Upon arrival, customers will check in at the entrance with market staff. If the market is at capacity, the customer will be given instructions on how they will be notified when they can go into shop.

Progress through the farmers’ market will only be in one direction. All market attendees will be required to enter through a specific entrance and will all leave out a designated exit, there will be no doubling back to shop at a vendor. Market staff, vendors, and customers will need to social distance, maintaining six feet distance from all others while inside the market area. In order to reduce shopping time, vendors will not have their product available where people can touch or handle product. Customers will need to request items that they want to purchase, and the farmer will package for purchase.

If you are sick with any of the following symptoms, stay home: fever, cough, shortness of breath, sore throat, muscle fatigue, chills, shaking with chills, loss of smell or taste. Other symptoms such as headache or digestive symptoms (vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain or lack of appetite) are potential symptoms related to COVID-19 and may prompt further screening, action or investigation.

If you believe you have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, or have symptoms of illness, you may not go out in public. Older adults and people of any age with serious underlying medical conditions – including serious heart conditions, chronic lung conditions, including moderate to severe asthma, severe obesity and those who are immunocompromised, including through cancer treatment – may have a higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19. We want to minimize the risk of spreading COVID-19 within our farmers’ market community, so if you are sick or have been exposed or are at higher risk for severe illness – stay home, do not go to the farmers’ market.

More information regarding the protocols for opening Delaware farmers’ markets can be found at https://de.gov/buylocal.

###


DHSS, Food Bank and Legislators Join Together to Distribute 30,000 Pounds of Food to Delawareans in Need

NEW CASTLE (Sept. 25, 2019) – Department of Health and Social Services employees joined together with the Food Bank of Delaware, legislators and other volunteers to distribute 30,000 pounds of non-perishable food, fresh produce and dairy products to Delawareans in need during a drive-through event today at DHSS’ Herman Holloway Campus near New Castle.

The food was made available through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Trade Mitigation Program, which is providing payments to American farmers for agricultural commodities impacted by trade tariffs imposed by China. In turn, the USDA is distributing those food products to food banks across the country, including the Food Bank of Delaware, through The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP).

Wednesday’s distribution is part of a DHSS effort to distribute more than 1,000 53-pound boxes to eligible Delawareans statewide. The boxes are filled with jars of peanut butter, cans of chickpeas, bags of walnuts and dried cranberries, canned pork, instant mashed potatoes and other non-perishable items. All of DHSS’ State Service Centers also have food boxes for distribution to Delaware residents who meet the income guidelines, and have a photo ID and proof of address.

“We are grateful for the ongoing partnership of the Food Bank of Delaware in helping us to meet the needs of vulnerable Delawareans,” said DHSS Secretary Dr. Kara Odom Walker, a practicing family physician. “Today’s distribution is another way we are reducing the impact of food insecurity in our state, providing families with healthy food items and making sure that no one goes hungry at their next meal.”

“Ensuring that Delawareans have access to nutritious food is a priority for us at the Food Bank of Delaware,” said Food Bank of Delaware President and CEO Patricia Beebe. “We are proud to partner with DHSS and legislators to get these boxes out into our community. With the ongoing trade mitigation, we anticipate receiving even more food from USDA. As a result, we will continue to look for more partners like DHSS to help distribute this product.”

In addition to the box of non-perishable foods, participants also received grapes, plums, potatoes, cheddar cheese and milk.

Secretary Walker thanked state Reps. Franklin Cooke and Melissa Minor-Brown, whose districts are near the Herman Holloway Campus, for volunteering at the distribution.

Legislators from across New Castle County also helped to promote the food box distribution, including state Sens. David McBride, Brian Townsend and Elizabeth “Tizzy” Lockman, and Reps. Ed Osienski, Kendra Johnson, Ray Seigfried, John Viola, Debra Heffernan, Cooke, Minor-Brown and others.

If you or a loved one in Delaware is struggling with food insecurity, you can be screened for and apply for food benefits at DHSS’ online portal, Delaware ASSIST:
https://assist.dhss.delaware.gov/

For more information about the Food Bank of Delaware, which distributes millions of pounds of products each year to its network of 536 hunger-relief program partners throughout the state, visit:
https://www.fbd.org/

See more photos from the event here.


Help is available for Delawareans struggling to afford food

Newark, Del. (January 30, 2019) – While the federal government has reopened, the country’s longest government shutdown continues to impact Delawareans, including the 136,000 individuals who utilize the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program to purchase food.

Because February SNAP benefits were issued early, this could result in some households having as much as a two-month gap between benefits according to the issuance schedule. The additional delay between issuance due to the shutdown will disrupt family budgets and many SNAP recipients are likely to need help filling this gap beginning in February and extending well into March.

“We know that many of our 136,000 SNAP clients will face challenges making their current food benefits last until the next food benefits are issued,” said Department of Health and Social Services Secretary Dr. Kara Odom Walker, a board-certified family physician. “That’s why we are collaborating with the Food Bank of Delaware and other community partners on this statewide food drive. Please join us in being there for our neighbors in need, because no one in Delaware should go hungry.”

Resources are available for Delawareans experiencing a “SNAP gap.”

• Delaware 2-1-1: Delawareans struggling to afford food may contact Delaware 2-1-1 by dialing 2-1-1 or (800) 560-3372 or texting (302) 231-1464 to find a food pantry that is conveniently located in their community. For a searchable database of resources, visit www.delaware211.org.
• State Service Centers: Clients already visiting Delaware State Service Centers may ask their case workers for food assistance through on-site food pantries.
• Food Bank of Delaware: The Food Bank will host three large outdoor mobile pantries in February to help meet increased demands for food assistance. To receive food, recipients must bring their EBT card and fill out paper work on site. Distributions will begin at 11:00 a.m. and food will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

  • Friday, February 8, 2019: Crossroad Community Church, 20684 State Forest Road, Georgetown
  • Friday, February 15, 2019: Calvary Church, 1141 East Lebanon Road, Dover
  • Friday, February 22, 2019: Canaan Baptist Church, 3011 New Castle Avenue, New Castle

“It is our mission to step up to ensure that no Delawarean goes without food,” said Food Bank of Delaware President and CEO Patricia Beebe. “Food-insecure families already have to stretch their monthly food budgets, and we know that SNAP benefits do not last the entire month – 90 percent of SNAP benefits are usually spent within the first three weeks of a month. To meet these increased demands from our neighbors, we stand ready to do all that we can. We cannot do this alone. The support of our community is needed.”

To help meet these increased demands for food assistance, the Food Bank of Delaware and the Delaware Department of Health and Social Services have launched a Neighbors Helping Neighbors food drive through March 1.

Most needed foods include:
• Canned meats like tuna fish and chicken
• Canned fruits
• Canned vegetables
• Peanut butter
• Cereal
• Pasta

To help reduce costs associated with food drives, food drive organizers are asked to use their own collection boxes or collection barrels may be picked up at the Food Bank at 14 Garfield Way, Newark or 1040 Mattlind Way, Milford anytime Monday-Friday from 8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. The Food Bank of Delaware will only be able to pick up donations larger than 20 boxes/bags. To learn more, visit: www.fbd.org/government-shutdown.