Delaware Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) report data again shows overall decrease in state’s onsite releases to land, air and water

DOVER – The annual Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) data report from Delaware’s industrial facilities as compiled by DNREC’s Emergency Prevention and Response Section shows the state continuing to make remarkable progress in reducing toxic releases into the environment. TRI data from 2014 – the most recent year for which statistics are available – shows a significant decrease in onsite releases to both land and air, with a slight increase in onsite releases to water, all as compared to 2013 figures. Total onsite releases were down 7 percent for 2014, with releases to land down 88 percent, air down 19 percent, and releases to water up 2 percent.

The reductions reflect a continued downward trend in toxic releases over the last 17 years – since 1998, when the reporting requirements were expanded to include a larger list of reporting facilities. The reporting of nitrate compounds released to water again had a major impact on the overall onsite releases, accounting for 78 percent (2.9 million pounds) of the total onsite releases. Releases for nitrate compounds were up by 61,000 pounds compared to 2013. The major changes impacting these reductions are covered below in the Delaware TRI summary and in greater detail throughout the report.

“Manufacturing and industrial facilities in Delaware continue to demonstrate that they can keep productivity high and minimize or reduce releases to our environment,” said DNREC Secretary David Small. “Enhanced technology, evolving best practices, the transparency of this TRI data, regulatory requirements and the public’s expectation for cleaner processes have all contributed to the positive trends we have seen since the inception of TRI reporting. DNREC looks forward to working with our diverse partners and stakeholders to continue this trend.”

Releases to air, land and water in Delaware are permitted by DNREC under rigorous environmental standards at both the national and state level. Permits granted by the department allow for limited discharge of pollutants within these standards that have been established for minimizing impacts to the environment and protecting public health.

Please refer to the following fact sheet for background on TRI and summary of 2014 TRI data. (The full TRI 2014 report and data are available at: http://www.dnrec.delaware.gov/SERC/Pages/Reports.aspx.)

Media Contacts: Debra Nielsen, DNREC Emergency Prevention and Response Section, 302-739-9405; or Michael Globetti, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902

Vol. 46, No. 20

 

FACT SHEET
Delaware Toxics Release Inventory
2014 Data and Report

What is TRI?
The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a publicly available data set containing information reported annually since 1987 for toxic chemicals manufactured, processed, or otherwise used by certain facilities in Delaware and throughout the United States. TRI was established in 1986 under Title III, Section 313, of the Federal Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA 313) to provide information to the public about the presence and release of toxic chemicals in their communities. Title III is also known as the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA).

Who must report?
Facilities that are required to the government under TRI must meet the following criteria:

  1. The facility must be covered under the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) or be a federal facility. Primarily, these NAICS codes include manufacturing facilities, oil and coal fired electric facilities, and bulk petroleum terminals.
  2. The facility must have 10 or more full time employees.
  3. The facility must manufacture or process over 25,000 pounds or otherwise use over 10,000 pounds of a TRI chemical. The list of reportable TRI chemicals includes of 594 individual chemicals and 30 chemical categories. Certain chemicals, such as persistent bio-accumulative toxins (PBTs), have lower reporting thresholds.

What is reported?
Facilities submit reports to Delaware’s Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on the waste management activities for the covered TRI chemicals. These activities include:

  1. Direct releases onsite to the environment. These releases are to air, water, and land.
  2. Waste managed onsite, which includes recycling, treatment, and energy recovery.
  3. Waste managed offsite, which includes recycling, treatment, energy recovery, or disposal.

Data from Delaware facilities is compiled by DNREC and the results are summarized in an annual report. A national analysis of the TRI data is provided by EPA’s annual report. It is noteworthy that TRI only requires reporting of releases and waste management activities, but not amounts used. The control of those releases is achieved separately through a variety of DNREC and EPA permits, laws and regulations.

Delaware 2014 TRI Results Summary

For 2014, 57 facilities submitted reports for 88 different chemicals. Approximately 3.75 million pounds were reported as being released onsite, a decrease of 278,000 pounds or 7 percent compared to 2013. Of this amount, approximately 18,000 pounds were released to land, while 800,000 pounds were released to air, and approximately 2.9 million pounds were released to water.

Onsite Releases

To Land: Onsite releases to land decreased by 134,000 pounds (88 percent) compared to 2013.

  • This reduction was primarily attributable to the Indian River Generating Station for releases of barium compounds to land, which are down 86,000 pounds compared to 2013. (The barium compounds are contained in coal ash and disposed of in a state-of-the-art landfill onsite.) This facility’s reduction in releases occurred because of their shutdown of unit No. 3 at the end of 2013, and also because of the milder winter in 2014 versus 2013,
  • Barium compounds were also the largest-reported release to land, with 14,000 pounds reported by Indian River Generating Station.

To Air: On-site releases to air were down approximately 194,000 pounds (19 percent) compared to 2013.

  • Reductions in releases to air were reported by several companies, with the largest decrease being reported by the Indian River Generating Station of hydrochloric acid, down 114,000 pounds compared to 2013.
  • Sulfuric acid was reported as the largest release to air at 298,000 pounds, with the majority being released by the Delaware City Refinery.

To Water: Total on-site releases to water increased by approximately 49,000 pounds (2 percent) compared to 2013.

  • The increase in releases to water was primarily due to increases of nitrate compound releases reported by the Delaware City Refinery, up 111,000 pounds compared to 2013.
  • Nitrate compounds were also reported as the largest release to water at 2.9 million pounds, with 2.74 million pounds (94 percent) released by the Delaware City Refinery and 169,000 (6 percent) released by Perdue Georgetown.

Offsite Transfers

Waste transferred offsite decreased by 584,000 pounds (4 percent) compared to 2013. Reductions in offsite recycling and waste sent to publicly owned treatment works (POTWs) offset increases in offsite disposal, offsite treatment, and offsite energy recovery.

Largest Change: The largest reduction was for offsite recycling of zinc compounds by Evraz Claymont Steel, due to the closure of this facility, down 1.5 million pounds compared to 2013.

Largest Chemical Reported: Lead compounds were the largest reported chemical amount transferred for offsite recycling at 5 million pounds, with 3.3 million pounds reported by the Johnson Controls Battery Plant, and 1.7 million pounds reported by the Johnson Controls Distribution plant.

Onsite Management

Waste managed onsite increased by 95 million pounds (24 percent) compared to 2013. Increases in onsite energy recovery and onsite treatment were partially offset by a small decrease in onsite recycling.

Largest Changes: Multiple facilities reported increases and decreases of more than a million pounds for onsite management compared to 2013. The largest reduction reported was for onsite treatment of hydrochloric acid by DuPont Edge Moor, with a reduction of 4.4 million pounds compared to 2013. The largest increase was for the onsite treatment of hydrogen sulfide by the Delaware City Refinery, up approximately 97.2 million pounds compared to 2013.

Largest Chemical Reported: Hydrogen sulfide was also the largest reported chemical amount managed onsite, with 433.6 million pounds being treated onsite, with the majority of that amount being reported by the Delaware City Refinery.

 


Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police Blotter: Jan. 11-17

Reminder for the week: Proper gear, precautions help protect winter boaters from cold weather hazards

DE F&W Natural Resources Police logoDOVER – To achieve public compliance through education and enforcement actions that help conserve Delaware’s fish and wildlife resources and ensure safe boating and public safety, DNREC Division of Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police officers between Jan. 11-17 made 1,756 contacts with anglers, boaters, hunters and the general public, including 21 vessel boardings for boating safety and fishing regulation compliance checks. Officers responded to 24 complaints and issued 16 citations. This week, with an expanded Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police presence continuing to be deployed as a deterrent, no citations were issued at the C&D Canal Conservation Area and associated recreational trail.

Items of note:

  • Michael L. Obrien
    Michael L. Obrien

    On Jan. 13, Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police arrested Michael L. Obrien, 32, of Seaford, for one count each of possession of a firearm by a person prohibited and hunting with a firearm during archery deer season on Nanticoke Wildlife Area. Obrien was video-arraigned at Justice of the Peace Court 2 in Rehoboth Beach and released on $5,000 unsecured bond pending a preliminary hearing in the Sussex County Court of Common Pleas.

  • On Jan. 11, Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police cited Joel Marousek, 51, of Marydel, for one count each of using a pistol to hunt and kill a deer during archery season and possession of unlawfully taken game, with fines totaling $330, including court costs. The deer was seized as evidence and subsequently donated to Delaware’s Sportsmen Against Hunger program.

Citations issued this week by offense category included the following, with the number of charges in parentheses:

Wildlife Conservation: Trespassing after hours on a state wildlife area (4), hunting deer with a firearm during archery season (2), possession of unlawfully taken game (4), no federal duck stamp (2), and hunting migratory waterfowl before legal shooting hours (2).

Boating and Boating Safety: No boating safety certificate (1).

Public Safety: Possession of a firearm by a person prohibited (1).

Are you AWARE?
DNREC’s Division of Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police remind the boating public to take precautions for winter weather and cold water, which puts those who hunt, fish or cruise our waterways at risk from hypothermia if they fall overboard.

“For those hardy outdoor enthusiasts who boat, fish and hunt in the winter, staying safe in the event of a boating mishap is all about choosing and using the right gear,” said Sgt. John McDerby, Division of Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police. “Falling overboard or getting excessively chilled or wet on deck can put you at risk for hypothermia, so dress and outfit yourself appropriately.”

Immersion in cold water can lead very quickly to hypothermia, in which the body instinctively protects its core by shutting down blood flow to limbs first. The U.S. Coast Guard recommends wearing layers for protection and warmth, including gloves and a hat. Recommended gear also includes three types of protective clothing to reduce risk: flotation coats, which double as life jackets but may not protect against hypothermia if the wearer falls into cold water; immersion or survival suits, which can increase survival time in cold water; or a dry suit to keep water out and, with thermal layers beneath, keep warmth in.

Other recommended safety items include:

  • Life jackets, worn by everyone on board, especially non-swimmers in all seasons; Delaware law requires that all children 12 years old and younger aboard a vessel wear a lifejacket while underway;
  • Blankets, to stay warm on board while awaiting rescue;
  • Multiple means of communication – a fully-charged cell phone and a marine radio; and
  • Items to attract the attention of rescuers: a whistle, a personal position locator beacon (PLB), a personal emergency locator light and/or flares, all kept in immersion suit pockets, secured with a lanyard.

Boat operators should also plan to spend a little extra time on vessel preparations and maintenance to help prevent breakdowns on the water, including checking fuel levels before heading out. “An equipment failure that would be a minor inconvenience in warmer weather could be life-threatening this time of year,” Sgt. McDerby said.

Sgt. McDerby also added these tips:

  • Check your vessel’s capacity plate for maximum weight to avoid overloading, which can lead to possible capsizing; hunting parties are reminded to take the weight of their gear into account.
  • Keep your cell phone in a secure pocket and sealed in a plastic bag.
  • Pack a set of dry clothing in a sealed plastic bag.
  • If you fall overboard or capsize, stay with your boat for a better chance of being found sooner.
  • Keep clothing on to help retain heat.
  • File a “float plan” with a responsible friend or family member. Include a description of your boat, when you plan to head out, who is going with you, where you plan to go and when you plan to return.

“Filing a float plan is always a good idea, because unforeseen circumstances can hit boaters in any season at any time, including a storm, engine problems, swamping and injuries or other health issues,” Sgt. McDerby said. “With your plans in a friend or family member’s hands, they can call for help if you’re overdue and tell searchers where to begin looking for you, saving precious time.”

For more information on safe boating practices in Delaware, including an easy-to-use float plan form, please visit Delaware Boating Safety on the Division of Fish & Wildlife website.

DNREC’s Division of Fish & Wildlife recognizes and thanks the majority of anglers, hunters and boaters who comply with and support Delaware’s fishing, hunting and boating laws and regulations. Citizens are encouraged to report fish, wildlife and boating violations to the Delaware Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police by calling 302-739-4580. Wildlife violations may also be reported anonymously to Operation Game Theft by calling 800-292-3030 or online at http://de.gov/ogt.

Media Contacts: Sgt. John McDerby, Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police, 302-739-9913 or 302-354-1386, or Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902

Vol. 46, No. 17


Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police Blotter: Jan. 4-10

Weekly reminder: After-hours entry, off-roading, target shooting in wildlife areas unlawful

DE F&W Natural Resources Police logoDOVER – To achieve public compliance through education and enforcement actions that help conserve Delaware’s fish and wildlife resources and ensure safe boating and public safety, DNREC Division of Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police officers between Jan. 4-10 made 851 contacts with anglers, boaters, hunters and the general public, including 74 vessel boardings for boating safety and fishing regulation compliance checks. Officers responded to 23 complaints and issued 12 citations, one of which was related to the C&D Canal Conservation Area and associated recreational trail, where there remains an increased Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police presence.

An item of note:

  • On Jan. 4, Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police cited Cody R. Stellar, 18, of Smyrna, for possession of marijuana near Townsend, with fines totaling $131, including court costs.

Citations issued this week by offense category included the following, with the number of charges in parentheses:

Wildlife Conservation: Operating a motor vehicle off an established roadway on a state wildlife area (1)*, hunting with an unplugged shotgun (1), no federal duck stamp (1), federal regulation/hunting brant out of season (1), possession of toxic lead shot while waterfowl hunting (1), and possession of over-the-limit waterfowl (1).

Fisheries Conservation: Unlicensed fishing (2).

Boating and Boating Safety: Operating a vessel with insufficient number of life jackets (1), and no boating safety certificate (1).

Public Safety: Possession of marijuana (1), and operating a motor vehicle without insurance (1).

* Citation issued at the C&D Canal Conservation Area.

Are you AWARE?
DNREC’s Division of Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police remind visitors to state wildlife areas, fishing piers and boat launching facilities that these areas are closed to the public from sunset to sunrise unless a person is actively and lawfully engaged in fishing or hunting in accordance with state regulations and individual wildlife area rules. Individuals not meeting these requirements who are found in state wildlife areas between sunset and sunrise face fines up to $100 for trespassing after hours.

Wildlife area visitors also are reminded that it is illegal to operate motor vehicles – including motorcycles, cars, trucks and SUVs – off established roadways in state wildlife areas. Violators found to have caused damage also will be cited for destruction of state property. In addition, operating a motor vehicle that is not licensed for use on established public roadways – including ATVs – is prohibited both on and off-road on state wildlife areas.

“With recent heavy rains and changing temperatures, the ground is especially vulnerable to damage from vehicles operating off-road,” said Sgt. John McDerby of Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police. “Doing ‘donuts’ or four-wheeling in wildlife areas is irresponsible and illegal behavior that damages essential wildlife habitat, as well as generating unnecessary work and expense to repair the damage.”

Other noteworthy general wildlife area rules and regulations to remember include:

  • Camping, swimming, fires, target shooting (including paintball) and dumping or littering are prohibited in state wildlife areas.
  • Dog training is permitted only within established dog training areas or during open hunting seasons for the game animals that the dog is being trained to hunt.
  • Hunting is permitted only in specified areas and only during designated hunting seasons.
  • Firearms are prohibited on state wildlife areas from March 1 to Aug. 31, except during legal hunting seasons or as authorized by the Division of Fish & Wildlife.
  • All state wildlife areas are designated carry-in, carry-out for trash.

For more information on individual wildlife areas, including the rules and regulations specific to each wildlife area, wildlife area visitors are encouraged to check out Delaware wildlife area maps. These maps are available in hard copy at DNREC’s Dover licensing desk and online at Delaware Wildlife Area Maps.

DNREC’s Division of Fish & Wildlife recognizes and thanks the majority of anglers, hunters and boaters who comply with and support Delaware’s fishing, hunting and boating laws and regulations. Citizens are encouraged to report fish, wildlife and boating violations to the Delaware Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police by calling 302-739-4580. Wildlife violations may also be reported anonymously to Operation Game Theft by calling 800-292-3030 or online at http://de.gov/ogt.

Media Contacts: Sgt. John McDerby, Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police, 302-739-9913 or 302-354-1386, or Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902

Vol. 46, No. 9


Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police join in rescue of swimmer off Dewey Beach

Marine Patrol (MP) Mike
DNREC Division of Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police Marine Patrol (MP) Mike

DEWEY BEACH – DNREC Division of Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police officers worked with the Delaware State Police Trooper 2 helicopter unit and Dewey Beach lifeguards today to locate and rescue a swimmer reported too far out in the ocean from an unguarded section of beach between Rehoboth and Dewey.

After a Dewey Beach lifeguard responded to the 911 call but was unable to reach him, Trooper 2 arrived and located the swimmer, who had been swept one-half mile offshore at the south end of Dewey, where Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police aboard marine patrol vessel MP-Mike pulled the man from the water. The swimmer, who was visiting from out-of-state, was taken to Beebe Medical Center in Lewes for evaluation.

“Swimming in the waters along Delaware’s ocean coast is a very popular summer pastime, but the area is known for its strong and sometimes unexpected tidal undertow or rip currents,” said Cpl. John McDerby, Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police. “In this case, we had an outgoing tide and a strong south wind, which can catch swimmers off guard and pull them out further than they intend to go. We encourage swimmers to be aware of these factors, choose guarded beaches, watch tides and stay close to the beach on windy days.”

The DNREC Division of Fish & Wildlife recognizes and thanks the majority of anglers, hunters and boaters who comply with and support Delaware’s fishing, hunting and boating laws and regulations. Citizens are encouraged to report fish and wildlife and boating violations to the Delaware Fish & Wildlife Enforcement Section by calling 302-739-4580. Wildlife violations may also be reported anonymously to Operation Game Theft by calling 800-292-3030 or online at www.dnrec.delaware.gov/fw/Hunting/Pages/OpGameTheft.aspx.

Media Contacts: Cpl. John McDerby, Division of Fish & Wildlife Enforcement Natural Resources Police, 302-739-9913 or 302-354-1386, or Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902

Vol. 45, No. 209


DNREC Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police Blotter: March 30-April 5

Reminder for the week: Public encouraged to report fishing, hunting, boating violations

DOVER – To achieve public compliance through education and enforcement actions that help conserve Delaware’s fish and wildlife resources and ensure safe boating and public safety, DNREC Division of Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police officers between March 30-April 5 made 1,048 contacts with anglers, hunters, boaters and the general public, including 32 vessel boardings for boating safety and fishing regulation compliance checks. Officers responded to 43 complaints and issued 40 citations. This week, with an expanded Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police presence deployed as a deterrent, no citations were issued at the C&D Canal Conservation Area and associated recreational trail.

Kaitlyn M. Hearn and James I. Taylor
Kaitlyn M. Hearn and James I. Taylor

Incidents of particular note were:

  • On April 3, Natural Resources Police officers arrested James I. Taylor, 36, of Laurel, and Kaitlyn M. Hearn, 20, of Seaford, in the Craigs Pond parking lot near Seaford, and charged them with two counts each of felony endangering the welfare of a child, one count each of possession of a controlled substance/heroin, and two counts each possession of drug paraphernalia. Both were arraigned and released on $5,000 unsecured bond each, pending trial at a later date. Two young children left in Taylor and Hearn’s care and found in their vehicle were turned over to their parents.
  • On April 1, Natural Resources Police officers cited Robert J. Hudson, 64, of Frankford, on one count of a food fish equipment permit violation for not having a recreational gillnet license in connection with a March 18 incident in which he had been charged with three net marking violations on Little Assawoman Bay. Hudson pled guilty to all four charges in Justice of the Peace Court 3 in Georgetown and was fined $423 including court costs. Also cited in the case on March 18 was John E. Pittman, 60, of Ocean View, who was charged with three counts of net marking violations and one count of net setting restriction violation/obstructing navigation. His case is still pending.

Citations issued by offense type included the following, with the number of charges in parentheses:

Wildlife Conservation: Unlicensed hunting (2), trespassing to hunt (1), hunting rabbits out of season (1), hunting rabbits using illegal method of take/weapon (1), operating a motor vehicle off an established roadway on state forest lands (1), hunting white-tailed deer during closed season (1)*, hunting with unlawful weapon during archery season (1)*, failure to display required hunter orange during a firearms deer season (1)*, possession of unlawfully taken antlerless deer (1)*, failure to retain deer tag (1)*, failure to tag antlerless deer (1)*, and failure to check antlerless deer within 24 hours (2)*, Sussex County.

*For more on this case, see this previously-issued press release: Sussex man caught on camera, arrested and fined for multiple deer hunting violations.

Fisheries Conservation: Recreational: Unlicensed fishing (11), New Castle, Kent and Sussex counties; Trespassing to fish (3), New Castle County; no food fish equipment permit/no recreational gill net license (1), Sussex County.

Boating and Boating Safety: Operating a vessel with insufficient number of life jackets (1), Sussex County.

Public Safety: Felony endangering the welfare of a child (4), possession of a controlled substance/heroin (2), and possession of drug paraphernalia (4), Sussex County.

Are you AWARE?
DNREC’s Division of Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police encourages residents and visitors to report violations of fishing, hunting and boating regulations by calling 302-739-4580, and shares some tips on information needed to investigate and make a case based on such reports.

“Since it is not possible for Fish & Wildlife officers to be everywhere 24/7, we encourage compliant anglers, hunters and boaters as well as the general public to report possible fish, wildlife and boating regulation violations to us for investigation,” said Cpl. John McDerby of Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police. “A timely call with good information helps Enforcement to better protect more of our resources, by enforcing Delaware’s regulations and educating the public.”

To ensure accurate, complete reports, callers are encouraged to take written notes when they witness what they believe to be a violation. The following information will assist agents in their investigation:

  • Time of day/night, date and location of the alleged violation
  • Descriptions of the alleged violators including any details on clothing and physical appearance; names if known
  • Descriptions of any vehicles or vessels involved; license plate numbers or boat registration numbers if known
  • Descriptions of any weapons involved
  • Descriptions of any fish, wildlife or other resources involved
  • Any other details about the incident witnessed, including possible human victims

“Just one word of caution to ethical anglers, boaters, hunters and others who witness illegal activity: for your own safety, do not try to confront suspected violators yourself,” Cpl. McDerby added. “Leave that to trained natural resources police officers.”

DNREC’s Division of Fish & Wildlife recognizes and thanks the majority of anglers, hunters and boaters who comply with and support Delaware’s fishing, hunting and boating laws and regulations. Citizens are encouraged to report fish and wildlife and boating violations to the Delaware Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police by calling 302-739-4580. Wildlife violations may also be reported anonymously to Operation Game Theft by calling 800-292-3030 or online at www.dnrec.delaware.gov/fw/Hunting/Pages/OpGameTheft.aspx.

Media Contacts: Cpl. John McDerby, DNREC Division of Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police, 302-739-9913 or 302-354-1386, or Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902

Vol. 45, No. 103