ICYMI: Governor Carney op-ed in The News Journal: “Innovation is Delaware’s path to jobs and prosperity”

WILMINGTON, Del. – Governor John Carney on Sunday published an op-ed in The News Journal titled, “Innovation is Delaware’s path to jobs and prosperity.” In the op-ed, Governor Carney outlines what his administration is doing differently to transition Delaware’s economy, to keep the state competitive, and to make sure Delaware is positioned to create good-paying jobs.

Below is the text from Governor Carney’s op-ed:

CARNEY: “Innovation is Delaware’s path to jobs and prosperity”
By Gov. John Carney

Incyte near Alapocas. Avalanche Industries in Selbyville. Fair Square Financial in Wilmington. ILC Dover in Frederica.

These Delaware-based companies all have this in common: they are relying on innovation to compete in their industries, and create jobs right here in our state.

And that’s something we need more of.

It’s no secret that Delaware’s economy has undergone a period of significant transition.

Since 1990, the percentage of Delaware’s economy consisting of manufacturing jobs has been cut in half.

DuPont now employs fewer than 6,000 people in Delaware, down from more than 30,000.

Automobile manufacturing plants closed in Newport and Newark, and the steel mill in Claymont was shuttered, eliminating job opportunities that existed for generations of Delawareans.

These losses have been difficult for many in our state.

But the bottom line is this: Delaware’s economy has changed and we must change with it.

Our economy has become more entrepreneurial and small-business driven. Innovative companies demand higher-skilled workers, and we’re competing not just with other states, but with other countries, for jobs and talent.

We must do things differently to ensure that Delaware remains a leading state to do business, and create good-paying jobs.

Here’s what my administration is doing to help:

Earlier this year, we partnered with DuPont and the University of Delaware to create the Delaware Innovation Space. This is a nonprofit that offers what many start-ups cannot afford on their own: state-of-the-art laboratories, premium lab equipment, and quality office space.

It uses the campus at DuPont’s Experimental Station near Wilmington. This is the same research campus where Delaware scientists invented Nylon and Kevlar — inventions that powered the company, and supported good-paying Delaware jobs for generations. Delaware entrepreneurs at the Innovation Space now have access to business and scientific leaders at the Experimental Station, mentoring programs, hands-on support and education to help them grow, thrive, and create jobs.

We believe this has the possibility to be transformational for companies housed at the Innovation Space. But we also believe this kind of partnership — one that draws on our state’s economic strengths to support new business and job growth — ought to serve as a model for how we improve Delaware’s economy.

Last week, I visited the Innovation Space, and signed paperwork creating the Delaware Prosperity Partnership — a public-private partnership that will lead business marketing efforts for the state. The Partnership will focus on attracting early-stage and technology-focused businesses, recruitment of large employers, and expansion of international business opportunities for Delaware companies.

The Partnership is the centerpiece of our new economic development strategy to position our state to lead in a 21st century economy.

I am personally committed to this effort.

I will chair the Board of the Delaware Prosperity Partnership. The Partnership’s directors will include members of the business community in all three counties, and it will be run day-to-day by a chief executive officer and a full-time staff.

It will work with employers and Delaware educators to make sure we’re training our students to do the jobs Delaware employers need to fill. The University of Delaware, Delaware Tech, Delaware State University, and other leaders in education, have an important role in preparing Delawareans for the workforce, and positioning Delaware’s economy to succeed.

Government, of course, will continue to play an important role in economic development. Within the Department of State, we have created the new Division of Small Business, Development, and Tourism that will focus on supporting Delaware’s small businesses and entrepreneurs.

Division leaders will provide guidance to small business owners on how to navigate local, state and federal laws and regulations. They will help small businesses identify local incubator programs, financing programs, networking events, and other resources.

And the division will improve the state’s outreach to women, minority and veteran-owned businesses. These businesses are crucial to empowering entrepreneurs and creating economic opportunities in diverse communities.

Importantly, this new state government division also will continue to provide oversight of taxpayer-funded programs that provide incentives for businesses to create new jobs in Delaware, and re-locate here.

We operate in a competitive environment, and it is important that we do not allow other states to out-compete Delaware for jobs. But oversight of these taxpayer-funded incentives belongs in government, and that will not change under our new plan.

This month, I am traveling our state to listen to Delaware’s business leaders on a Jobs & Economy Tour. Alongside members of the General Assembly, I have begun a series of roundtables with small business owners. Already we’ve heard the importance of addressing balanced tax and spending policies and addressing rising healthcare costs for businesses.

We also will tour innovative businesses to learn what has made them successful, and see how we can contribute to their success. I visited The Mill in Wilmington this week. I plan to tour companies like Avalanche Industries in Selbyville.

And we’ll visit the pharmaceutical company Incyte — a real Delaware success story. The company grew out of its space at the DuPont Experimental Station and, later this year, will move hundreds of employees into a renovated headquarters at Augustine Cut-off.

We intend to continue building on this momentum.

We recognize that our economy has fundamentally changed, and we must be willing to adapt to keep pace with changing times. As I said when I took office in January, we can no longer expect any single industry or company to be responsible for Delaware’s economic stability, let alone our future.

We are working hard to transition Delaware’s economy, to keep our state competitive, and to make sure we are positioned to create good-paying jobs. This has to be our top priority.

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Governor Carney Takes Steps to Restructure Delaware’s Economic Development Efforts, Create Jobs

Governor celebrates passage of House Bill 226 and signs paperwork creating Delaware Prosperity Partnership

WILMINGTON, Del. – Governor John Carney on Monday held a signing ceremony for House Bill 226, a major piece of legislation that restructures Delaware’s economic development efforts, with a focus on supporting Delaware small businesses, innovators and entrepreneurs.

Governor Carney also signed incorporation paperwork creating the Delaware Prosperity Partnership – a public-private partnership that will leverage private sector resources to enhance business recruitment, promote entrepreneurship and innovation, support workforce development efforts, and produce forward looking-analyses on economic trends to best position Delaware’s economy to grow.

Governor Carney Takes Steps to Restructure Delaware’s Economic Development Efforts, Create Jobs
Governor Carney holds signed incorporation documents for the Delaware Prosperity Partnership.

 

Legislation restructuring Delaware’s economic development efforts, and authorizing creation of the partnership, was sponsored by Representative Bryon Short, Senator Jack Walsh, Senator Brian Pettyjohn, and Representative Lyndon Yearick.

Monday’s ceremony was held at the Delaware Innovation Space at the DuPont Experimental Station research campus in Alapocas.

“By restructuring our economic development efforts, we’re positioning Delaware to create good-paying jobs, build an entrepreneurial ecosystem, and ensure that Delaware remains a leading state to do business,” said Governor Carney. “We will partner with private business to draw on new resources, and ideas, for improving our economy. And we will offer new, targeted support for small businesses and entrepreneurs who are responsible for much of our economic growth and job creation. Thank you to members of the General Assembly and members of our Economic Development Working Group for their leadership on this important issue.”

On January 18 – his first full day in office – Governor Carney signed Executive Order #1 to create the Economic Development Working Group and explore a new economic development strategy. The Governor worked closely with members of the General Assembly to approve the concept and funding for the public-private entity, as well as a new division at the Department of State to oversee responsibilities for small business development and tourism.

Governor Carney’s plan to fundamentally restructure Delaware’s economic development efforts includes two significant elements:

  • Creation of the Delaware Prosperity Partnership to partner with private business to improve how Delaware attracts new business and job growth, and;
  • Creation of a new Division of Small Business, Development, and Tourism within state government to offer targeted support for small business owners, entrepreneurs, and minority-owned businesses.

Governor Carney will co-chair the board of the Delaware Prosperity Partnership. The partnership – which will be run day-to-day by a chief executive officer and a full-time staff – will lead business marketing efforts for the state, with a focus on attracting early-stage and technology-focused businesses, recruitment of large employers, and expansion of international business opportunities for Delaware companies. Its leaders also will work with employers and Delaware educators to fill key talent gaps in the state, and conduct forward-looking economic analyses to inform its work. The state will jointly fund the partnership’s operations with private business.
Delaware’s new Division of Small Business, Development, and Tourism will provide guidance to small business owners on how to navigate local, state and federal laws and regulations. The division will help small businesses identify resources such as local incubator programs, financing, and networking events. It also will improve the state’s outreach to women and minority entrepreneurs, and veteran-owned businesses. And division leaders will oversee Delaware’s taxpayer-funded incentive programs for job creation.
Restructuring the state’s economic development efforts, and partnering strategically with the private sector, was a recommendation of Governor Carney’s Action Plan For Delaware, and of the Economic Development Working Group, a panel chaired by Dr. Mark Brainard, President of Delaware Technical Community College, and Rod Ward, President and CEO of CSC.

Reaction to Governor Carney’s signing on Monday:

“This legislation is forward-thinking and recognizes the changes that need to take place to foster economic development in our state,” said Representative Bryon Short, D-Brandywine Hundred. “I am encouraged by the focus on innovation and entrepreneurship with the new partnerships under this office and look forward to see new opportunities in Delaware going forward.”

“It’s more clear than ever that we need to adapt to a changing economy,” said Senator Jack Walsh, D-Stanton. “That means attracting new businesses, helping startups and small businesses flourish, and supporting the best-in-class workforce that made us the world’s leading economy in the first place. This will give Delaware a faster, more nimble and responsive means of interacting with potential clients. In each case, the public and private sectors need to collaborate to keep us ahead of the ball. The public-private partnership is a win-win that will make our economy more dynamic, lead to better public policy, and equip our workforce with the skills that the new economy demands.”

“Speaking as a former business owner, and as someone who is presently employed in the private sector, I am very enthusiastic about this initiative,” said Representative Lyndon Yearick, R-Dover South. “Bringing experienced business people directly into the process of fostering entrepreneurship is both pragmatic and promising.”

“It has been an honor to work with Rod and so many leaders throughout our state to deliver on the Governor’s first priority – creating an economic development model that will position our state to meet the challenges that lie ahead,” said Dr. Mark Brainard, President of Delaware Technical Community College. “Governor Carney’s vision, combined with his leadership in getting this legislation passed, lays the foundation for continued success in keeping, adding and creating new jobs in the future.”
“The creation of the Delaware Prosperity Partnership is a landmark achievement in the future economic development efforts for the state,” said Terry Murphy, Chairman of the Delaware Business Roundtable and President of Bayhealth. “For the first time, Delaware government, employers and academia are formally cooperating to create a culture of growth and entrepreneurship as we work to expand the state’s economy by attracting jobs, talent and capital investment.”
“Catalyzing innovation and entrepreneurship is critical to our economic success as a state and as a community,” said Bill Provine, President and CEO of the Delaware Innovation Space, who hosted Monday’s ceremony. “The strength of public-private partnerships such as the Delaware Prosperity Partnership and the Delaware Innovation Space enable us to focus and channel our energy together to achieve the best results for all of Delaware.”

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Governor Carney, Chief Information Officer Announce Innovative Cybersecurity Partnership for Students

Online cybersecurity training offers scholarship opportunities for Delaware high school juniors and seniors, and college students

WILMINGTON, Del. – Governor John Carney announced on Friday a new, innovative cybersecurity training partnership between the SANS Institute and the State of Delaware that provides Delaware high school juniors and seniors at least 16 years old, and college students interested in a cybersecurity career, the opportunity to learn basic cybersecurity skills and test their aptitude through a no-cost online game of discovery called CyberStart.

“Delaware’s future is an innovation economy where technology takes center stage, and our state needs a pipeline of talented cybersecurity professionals,” said Governor John Carney. “I am excited that Delaware is able to partner with an organization like the SANS Institute to engage our state’s high school and college students, and encourage them to explore the field of cybersecurity.”

An introductory practice version of CyberStart will be available online from July 14-28, 2017. Participants who complete five of the eight practice modules will be invited to compete in the full-scale program that will run from August 1-28, 2017. The practice round is mandatory for those who would like to compete.

Participants do not need prior cybersecurity knowledge. Students from Delaware who excel in the CyberStart game will have the opportunity to share in $150,000 in scholarships for further cyber-education, and ultimately for $500,000 in scholarships for college and graduate-level training in preparation for highly sought-after industry certifications.

Delaware students will be competing with students from Virginia, Michigan, Rhode Island, Iowa, Nevada, and Hawaii for scholarships sponsored by the SANS Institute.

“I applaud the SANS Institute for working to ensure the cyber workforce of tomorrow is available to protect our information and systems. The CyberStart program is an excellent and fun opportunity for students who think they may be interested in cybersecurity to determine if they have the passion and aptitude to pursue it as a career,” said Delaware Chief Information Officer James Collins. “I hope young people all across Delaware take advantage of this great opportunity.”

Each player in CyberStart begins as a “cyber protection agent” responsible for protecting an important operational base.  The student chooses and solves challenges, earning points along the way. A cyber protection agent field manual provides answers to questions that may arise and hints help when players get stuck. When the player has solved a sufficient number challenges at one level, a new level opens up and new challenges appear – for a total of 31 levels.

When asked why SANS is making this investment, SANS Director of Research, Alan Paller, said “Because the nation desperately needs more highly-skilled cyber professionals, and we have new evidence that CyberStart will radically improve the quality and preparation of people entering the cybersecurity field.  SANS trains more than 30,000 advanced cybersecurity professionals each year for military and intelligence organizations and for large high-tech companies in the U.S. and its allies. We discovered that those who have mastered the topics taught and measured in the CyberStart program do far better than others in the advanced cybersecurity courses that prepare the critically needed people. By opening CyberStart to hundreds of thousands of students we may be able to help the nation identify the next generation of talented people who will excel in this critical field.”

For more information and to get started playing CyberStart, please visit DigiKnow.DTI.Delaware.gov.


Governor Carney and Legislators Announce Bill to Spur Investment in Innovative, Delaware-based Small Businesses

Bipartisan Angel Investor Job Creation and Innovation Act establishes 25 percent tax credit for investments in innovation

DOVER, Del. – Governor John Carney and legislators in the Delaware House of Representatives on Friday announced new legislation – the Angel Investor Job Creation and Innovation Act – that would establish a refundable tax credit for qualified investors in innovative, Delaware-based small businesses, to spur job creation and innovation.

The bipartisan legislation, House Bill 170, was filed on Wednesday and is sponsored by Representative Michael Ramone. Additional House sponsors include Representative Bryon Short, Representative Melanie George Smith, and Representative Dave Wilson. Senate sponsors include Senate President Pro Tem David McBride and Senator Cathy Cloutier.

“We should do everything we can to support Delaware’s innovators and entrepreneurs who are leading Delaware’s new economy,” said Governor John Carney. “This legislation would encourage investments in innovative, Delaware-based small businesses and connect our most talented entrepreneurs with the resources they need to be successful. Thank you to all the members of the General Assembly who are leading this important initiative.”

“If we in the state are serious about fostering economic development in Delaware, and I believe we are, then the Angel Investor Job Creation and Innovation Act must take effect sooner rather than later,” said Representative Michael Ramone. “The funding that would be available through this legislation is critical in helping scientific or technology small businesses get off the ground and begin operating. This will be the second time we have tried to enact such a measure. I introduced a similar bill last year and I am hopeful, that with the Governor’s support this year, we can enact this important bill.”

“Startup and fledgling businesses often face difficult times in their early stages. An infusion of capital can be the difference between a company thriving and closing up shop,” said Representative Bryon Short. “By encouraging angel investors through a tax credit program, we could be opening an avenue that gives new businesses that shot in the arm they need at a critical time. This is just one more step we can take to help revitalize Delaware’s economy.”

“Our future rests with people whose names we probably don’t even know, who are creating new breakthroughs in science and technology,” said Senate President Pro Tem David McBride. “But those brilliant innovators need help to take their ideas from the drawing board into our homes and businesses. I think this bill creates an avenue to spur that growth and help keep Delaware’s place as a home of innovation and invention.”

“Government doesn’t create jobs, but it can provide incentives to build the businesses that do. I am very excited about this Angel Investor Job Creation and Innovation Act that could give that extra boost to so many of our promising startup companies,” said Senator Cathy Cloutier. “I’m happy to put my support behind it.”

The Angel Investor Job Creation and Innovation Act would establish guidelines for awarding a tax credit worth up to 25 percent of the investment in a qualified, Delaware-based small business. Businesses receiving the investment must pay decent wages, employ fewer than 25 employees, and engage in innovation in one of several areas as its primary business activity.

Qualified business activities include:

  • Using proprietary technology to add value to a product, process, or service in a qualified high-technology field
  • Researching or developing a proprietary product, process, or service in a qualified high-technology field
  • Researching, developing, or producing a proprietary product, process, or service in the fields of agriculture, manufacturing, wildlife preservation, environmental science, financial technology, or transportation
  • Researching, developing, or producing a new proprietary technology for use in the fields of agriculture, manufacturing, financial technology, or transportation

The Angel Investor Job Creation and Innovation Act has been assigned to the Economic Development Committee in the Delaware House of Representatives.

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Partnership Creates Major Business Incubator & Research Institute at Experimental Station

State of Delaware, DuPont and University of Delaware partner to form Delaware Innovation Space, Inc.
 
WILMINGTON, Del. – Governor John Carney on Monday announced the creation of the Delaware Innovation Space, Inc. – a nonprofit public-private partnership established by the State of Delaware, DuPont, and the University of Delaware that will catalyze the entrepreneurial growth of new science-based businesses and ventures in Delaware.

The Delaware Innovation Space will be headquartered at the DuPont Experimental Station research campus in Alapocas.

Formed as a separate nonprofit organization and legal entity and governed by an independent board, the Delaware Innovation Space will operate as an incubator to accelerate and drive new business growth, and as a research institute for the advancement of science in collaboration with the diverse scientific talent base in Delaware.

Each founding partner will contribute assets in support of the formation of the nonprofit, and two members to its initial Board of Directors.

“Delaware’s economy remains in transition, and we should do everything we can to support innovation, and partner with the private sector to drive business and job growth,” said Governor Carney. “DuPont and the University of Delaware have long histories of innovation, and remain crucially important to the future of our economy and our state. This partnership will draw upon the resources of those institutions to help science-based businesses grow here in Delaware, and connect Delaware’s students to the work of our most talented innovators.”

“The Innovation Space at the Experimental Station shows that DuPont, the state and the University of Delaware are committed to creating a nurturing environment for business to grow and thrive,” said U.S. Senator Tom Carper. “Delaware may be small, but we are nimble. We have all levels of government partnering with the private and non-profit sectors to find ways to make Delaware a more attractive place to do business. The Innovation Space is another example of a great idea that came from the power of partnerships.”

“This building will provide Delaware with what startups in our region need the most, high quality and market rate lab space,” said U.S. Senator Chris Coons. “In the Senate, I have worked hard to give science based early stage companies tools they need, but ultimately Delaware needs more lab space like this in order to help local companies grow and for us to attract other companies from outside of our state. I am thrilled to see this building come to fruition, and excited to see what technologies emerge from this site.”

“It’s exciting to see what we can accomplish when we come together, and I’m grateful for the University of Delaware and DuPont for their continued support of a brighter future for Delaware,” said Congresswoman Lisa Blunt Rochester. “Not only will this partnership promote economic growth and attract new businesses, it will also provide students with exciting opportunities to get hands on research experience in growing fields.”

“DuPont’s vision for the Experimental Station is to harness the power of collaboration to drive innovation,” said Doug Muzyka, DuPont Senior Vice President and Chief Science and Technology Officer. “The Delaware Innovation Space will accelerate new business growth and give entrepreneurs, scientific leaders, and businesses access to best-in-class talent, resources and the culture of the Experimental Station.”

“UD fosters a strong, productive and longstanding relationship with the State and DuPont that advances scientific inquiry, strengthens our economy and improves the lives of Delawareans,” said Dennis Assanis, University of Delaware President. “The Delaware Innovation Space represents a new and exciting chapter in that partnership, one that will benefit our community for many more decades ahead.”

The partnership of the State of Delaware, DuPont and the University of Delaware at the Experimental Station not only will fuel growth of science-based businesses; it will spur job creation, creativity, and develop, attract and retain science talent in Delaware.

The Delaware Innovation Space will focus on key Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) areas that align with strengths both DuPont and UD bring to the venture. They include industrial biotechnology, renewable energy, advanced materials, chemical ingredients, nutrition and healthcare to help strengthen Delaware’s presence as a leader in those areas.

It also will provide education to entrepreneurs and startups, help accelerate the formation of new businesses, and connect Delaware’s students with the work of innovators and entrepreneurs.

The Delaware Innovation Space will be located in a dedicated building (E500) at the Experimental Station. It will include approximately 100,000 square feet of innovative laboratory and office space comprised of a mix of large shared lab spaces and open office areas in addition to private laboratory and office suites.  Delaware Innovation clientele also will have access to other common spaces and leveraged capabilities at the Experimental Station.

Partner contributions include:
State of Delaware:

  • $5 million in startup funding support over 3 years from the Delaware Strategic Fund
  • Key support from public stakeholders in attracting companies to Delaware

DuPont:

  • $1.25 million in startup funding
  • Modern laboratory and office building at the Experimental Station, valued at approximately $15 million today
  • Laboratory equipment valued at up to $2 million
  • Nonprofit set-up costs

University of Delaware:

  • $1.5 million in startup funding over three years
  • Student internships
  • On-site workshops and seminars led by UD faculty members
  • Grant writing support

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