Historical Affairs Programs In June 2022

(DOVER, Del. — May 25, 2022) — The Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs will be sponsoring four special programs during the month of June 2022. A full schedule is included below. Admission is free and open to the public, but reservations are required for some programs. Go to the following link for additional information and reservation instructions: https://history.delaware.gov/2022/05/02/hca-programs-june-2022.

Photo of the a scene in front of the New Castle Court House Museum as part of a previous Separation Day parade.
Scene in front of the New Castle Court House Museum as part of a previous Separation Day parade.

Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs special programs, June 2022

Friday and Saturday, June 10 and 11, 2022
Separation Day. Celebration marking the 246th anniversary of Delaware’s separation from Great Britain and Pennsylvania and the formation of the Delaware State. Event includes activities at the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ New Castle Court House Museum. Downtown New Castle. Friday, 6–9:30 p.m. Saturday, Noon–10 p.m. 302-323-4453.

Saturday, June 11, 2022
Cooch’s Bridge Historic Site: Touring the homestead. Join historical interpreters for this introductory program on the history of the Cooch’s Bridge homestead. Learn about some of the individuals who lived on the property, how they shaped the land around them and how the location’s landscape contributed to national history. Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ Cooch’s Bridge Historic Site, 961 Old Baltimore Pike, Newark. Tours at 10 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. Limit 20 visitors per tour. Free admission but reservations required. NOTE: Tours at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are fully booked. 302-922-7116 or mailto:CBmuseum@delaware.gov.

Saturday, June 18, 2022
“Rosedale Beach.” Virtual Juneteenth program from the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ Zwaanendael Museum in which Tamara Burks discusses the Millsboro, Del. resort/hotel where Black, Indigenous and other people of color found relaxation and entertainment from the 1900s to the 1970s. Program streamed live via Zoom. 4 p.m. Free admission but reservations required. 302-645-1148 or mailto:zmuseum@delaware.gov.

Saturday, June 25, 2022
“An Uphill Battle: The Unfulfilled Promise of the Civil War 1865-1896.” At the end of the Civil War, great change seemed promised with the first federal civil rights acts and amendments. Why instead did the nation descend into segregation? In recognition of Juneteenth, lead historic-site interpreter Gavin Malone explores the constitutional amendments, the first federal civil rights acts, Delaware’s political climate and reactions to federal legislation ending with the Plessy decision. Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ Old State House, 25 The Green, Dover. 1 p.m. 302-744-5054 or mailto:OSHmuseum@delaware.gov.

Wednesday, June 29, 2022
“Well Seasoned Heirlooms.” Virtual program in which historic site interpreter Kimberly Fritsch of the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ New Castle Court House Museum shines a spotlight on the culinary practices, recipes and personalized cookbooks of women throughout Delaware history as they speak to us through their food. Cookbooks became a way for women to pass along their legacy and convey a sense of what was important in their culture, daily lives and, even, weather occurrences and events of the time. Program streamed live via Zoom. Noon. Free admission but reservations required. 302-323-4453 or mailto:NCCHmuseum@delaware.gov.


Remaining division program in May 2022

In addition, the division will be presenting the following program during the remainder of May.

Saturday, May 28, 2022
“Time Traveling Tea.” Program in which lead historical interpreter Juliette Wurm explores the time when the court house building served as a restaurant called the Old Court House Tea Room which was in operation from the 1920s until the 1950s. Complimentary tea and light refreshments provided. Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ New Castle Court House Museum, 211 Delaware St., New Castle. 11:30 a.m. Free admission but reservations required. 302-323-4453 or mailto:NCCHmuseum@delaware.gov.

Administered by the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs, the five museums of the State of Delaware — the John Dickinson Plantation, the Johnson Victrola Museum, the New Castle Court House Museum, The Old State House and the Zwaanendael Museum — tell the story of the First State’s contributions to the history and culture of the United States. Through tours, exhibits and special programs, the museums shine a spotlight on Delaware’s unique history and the diverse people who came to live there. The museums are accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. The New Castle Court House Museum and the John Dickinson Plantation are partner sites of the First State National Historical Park. The Old State House is located on the Dover Green, another partner site of the park. Go to the following for a long-term calendar of division-sponsored events.


The Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs is an agency of the State of Delaware. The division enhances Delaware’s quality of life by preserving the state’s unique historical heritage, fostering community stability and economic vitality and providing educational programs and assistance to the public on Delaware history. The division’s diverse array of services includes operation of five museums, administration of the State Historic Preservation Office, conservation of the State’s archaeological and historic-objects collections, operation of a conference center and management of historic properties across the state. Primary funding for division programs and services is provided by annual appropriations from the Delaware General Assembly and grants from the National Park Service, Department of the Interior, a federal agency. However, the contents and opinions expressed in the division’s programs and services do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the Department of the Interior.

Contact:
Jim Yurasek
Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs
Phone: 302-577-5170
E-mail: Jim.Yurasek@delaware.gov
Web: http://history.delaware.gov


Historical and Cultural Affairs programs in May 2022

(DOVER, Del. — April 18, 2022) — The Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs will be sponsoring seven special events during the month of May 2022. A full schedule is included below. Except where noted, all programs are free and open to the public.

Artistic rendition of the capsizing of the DeBraak by Peggy Kane, 1990. The ship and its sinking will be explored in the program “The Wooden World Revealed” at the Zwaanendael Museum on May 21, 2022.
Artistic rendition of the capsizing of the DeBraak by Peggy Kane, 1990. The ship and its sinking will be explored in the program “The Wooden World Revealed” at the Zwaanendael Museum on May 21, 2022.

Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs special programs, May 2022

Saturday, May 7, 2022
Dover Days Festival. Celebration of Delaware history featuring historical re-enactments, parade, maypole dancing, walking tours, pet parade, arts and crafts, music and more. Events are primarily based in downtown Dover locations including the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ Johnson Victrola Museum and The Old State House. 9 a.m.–3 p.m. 302-734-4888.

Friday, May 13, 2022
RESCHEDULED — Concert by Captain Blue’s Grass Band. Acoustic/folk/rock/Americana music. Presented in partnership with the Delaware Friends of Folk. Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ Old State House, 25 The Green, Dover. 7:30 p.m. 302-744-5054 or mailto:OSHmuseum@delaware.gov. NOTE: This concert, originally scheduled for Feb. 11, 2022, was rescheduled to May 13, 2022.

Saturday, May 14, 2022
Buena Vista spring event. Enjoy a spring day at of one of Delaware’s most historic estates completed by former U.S. Secretary of State John M. Clayton in 1847. Visitors can go for nature walks, learn about the gardens and agricultural history of the farm, enjoy educational programs by the Sunshine Plein Air Artists and Bluebird Society, and participate in outdoor children’s games. Photography and picnicking are welcome. Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ Buena Vista: A Delaware Country Estate, 661 S. Dupont Highway (Route 13), New Castle. 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Rain date: Sunday, May 15. 302-323-4430.

Saturday, May 14, 2022
Cooch’s Bridge Historic Site: Touring the homestead. Join historical interpreters for this introductory program on the history of the Cooch’s Bridge homestead. Learn about some of the individuals who lived on the property, how they shaped the land around them and how the location’s landscape contributed to national history. Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ Cooch’s Bridge Historic Site, 961 Old Baltimore Pike, Newark. Tours at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Limit 20 visitors per tour. Free admission but reservations required. NOTE: Both May 14 tours are fully booked. Reservations are now being accepted for June 11, 2022 tours by going to https://tinyurl.com/CoochHomesteadTour or mailto:coochsbridgehistoricsite@gmail.com.

Saturday, May 21, 2022
“The Wooden World Revealed.” A day of activities commemorating HMS DeBraak, a British warship that sank off the coast of Delaware on May 25, 1798. Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ Zwaanendael Museum, 102 Kings Highway, Lewes. 10 a.m.–4:15 p.m. 302-645-1148 or mailto:zmuseum@delaware.gov.

Saturday, May 21, 2022
A Day in Old New Castle. The oldest house and garden tour in the nation includes programs at the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ New Castle Court House Museum and the New Castle Green. Downtown New Castle. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission free at the New Castle Court House Museum. Admission charge at other venues. 302-322-5774.

Saturday, May 28, 2022
“Time Traveling Tea.” Program in which lead historical interpreter Juliette Wurm explores the time when the court house building served as a restaurant called the Old Court House Tea Room which was in operation from the 1920s until the 1950s. Complimentary tea and light refreshments provided. Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ New Castle Court House Museum, 211 Delaware St., New Castle. 11:30 a.m. Free admission but reservations required by calling 302-323-4453 or mailto:NCCHmuseum@delaware.gov.

Remaining division programs in April 2022

In addition, the division will be presenting three programs listed below during the remainder of April.

Thursday, April 21, 2022
“The Federalist Views of James A. Bayard.” Living-history theatrical performance in which lead historic-site interpreter Gavin Malone portrays Delaware’s James A. Bayard, a prominent member of the Federalist Party and one of the leading voices opposing the war, as he prepares to leave for treaty negotiations with Great Britain. Complimentary coffee and cookies provided. Part three of the four-part 2022 Coffee-Hour Lecture Series — “The War of 1812: Over Two Centuries Later.” Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ Old State House, 25 The Green, Dover. 5 p.m. 302-744-5054 or mailto:OSHmuseum@delaware.gov.

Wednesday, April 27, 2022
King’s Day. Celebration of the birthday of King Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands in a program that will also explore royal titles and Delaware’s Dutch connection. Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ Zwaanendael Museum, 102 Kings Highway, Lewes. 10 a.m.–4:15 p.m. 302-645-1148 or mailto:zmuseum@delaware.gov.

Thursday, April 28, 2022
“Stories of the Dauntless Women of the War of 1812.” Lecture by historic-site interpreter Susan Emory exploring the brave women from America, England and Canada who played important roles in the war effort. Complimentary coffee and cookies provided. Final installment of the four-part 2022 Coffee-Hour Lecture Series — “The War of 1812: Over Two Centuries Later.” Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ Old State House, 25 The Green, Dover. 5 p.m. 302-744-5054 or mailto:OSHmuseum@delaware.gov.

Administered by the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs, the five museums of the State of Delaware — the John Dickinson Plantation, the Johnson Victrola Museum, the New Castle Court House Museum, The Old State House and the Zwaanendael Museum — tell the story of the First State’s contributions to the history and culture of the United States. Through tours, exhibits and special programs, the museums shine a spotlight on Delaware’s unique history and the diverse people who came to live there. The museums are accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. The New Castle Court House Museum and the John Dickinson Plantation are partner sites of the First State National Historical Park. The Old State House is located on the Dover Green, another partner site of the park. Go to the following for a long-term calendar of division-sponsored events.


The Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs is an agency of the State of Delaware. The division enhances Delaware’s quality of life by preserving the state’s unique historical heritage, fostering community stability and economic vitality and providing educational programs and assistance to the public on Delaware history. The division’s diverse array of services includes operation of five museums, administration of the State Historic Preservation Office, conservation of the State’s archaeological and historic-objects collections, operation of a conference center and management of historic properties across the state. Primary funding for division programs and services is provided by annual appropriations from the Delaware General Assembly and grants from the National Park Service, Department of the Interior, a federal agency. However, the contents and opinions expressed in the division’s programs and services do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the Department of the Interior.

Contact:
Jim Yurasek
Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs
Phone: 302-577-5170
E-mail: Jim.Yurasek@delaware.gov
Web: http://history.delaware.gov


‘The War of 1812: Over Two Centuries Later’

-Old State House Coffee-Hour Lecture Series to take place in April 2022-

(DOVER, Del. — March 14, 2022) — Beginning on April 7 and continuing each Thursday in April 2022, the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ Old State House, located at 25 The Green in Dover, Delaware, will present four free programs as part of its seventh annual Coffee-Hour Lecture Series. This year’s series is entitled “The War of 1812: Over Two Centuries Later.”  

Photo of an American flag from the time of the War of 1812
American flag from the time of the War of 1812

The series is designed to provide stimulating programming for audiences who have just left work for the day. Programs will take place between 5 and 6:15 p.m. Admission is free and open to the public with complimentary coffee and cookies available for those in attendance. For additional information, call 302-744-5054 or mailto:OSHmuseum@delaware.gov.

Descriptions of the four programs are as follows:

Thursday, April 7, 2022
“African Americans Play a Vital Role in the War of 1812.” Due to slavery in the United States, Black Americans often chose different sides in the War of 1812. In this lecture, historic-site interpreter Tom Pulmano discusses the role played by African Americans in both the American and British war efforts.

Thursday, April 14, 2022
“Reminiscences of the Life and Times of Dr. James Tilton.” Lecture by historic-site interpreter Steven Mumford exploring the life and long medical career of Delawarean Dr. James Tilton who served as United States surgeon general during the War of 1812.

Thursday, April 21, 2022
“The Federalist Views of James A. Bayard.” Living-history theatrical performance in which lead historic-site interpreter Gavin Malone portrays Delaware’s James A. Bayard, a prominent member of the Federalist Party and one of the leading voices opposing the war, as he prepares to leave for treaty negotiations with Great Britain.

Thursday, April 28, 2022
“Stories of the Dauntless Women of the War of 1812.” Lecture by historic-site interpreter Susan Emory exploring the brave women from America, England and Canada who played important roles in the war effort.

Photo of The Old State House at night
The Old State House

Completed in 1791, The Old State House is one of the earliest state-house buildings in the United States, serving as the home of Delaware’s legislature until 1933 when the General Assembly moved to larger quarters in Legislative Hall. The venerable structure now appears as it would have in the late 1700s during the United States’ critical early years as a nation. It features a courtroom, governor’s and county offices and chambers for the state’s Senate and House of Representatives. The building is situated on Dover’s historic Green, a public area designated by William Penn in 1683. The Green is a partner site of the First State National Historical Park.

  The Old State House is administered by the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs, an agency of the State of Delaware. The division enhances Delaware’s quality of life by preserving the state’s unique historical heritage, fostering community stability and economic vitality and providing educational programs and assistance to the general public on Delaware history. The division’s diverse array of services includes operation of five museums which are accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, administration of the State Historic Preservation Office, conservation of the state’s archaeological and historic-objects collections, operation of a conference center and management of historic properties across the state. Primary funding for division programs and services is provided by annual appropriations from the Delaware General Assembly and grants from the National Park Service, Department of the Interior, a federal agency. However, the contents and opinions expressed in the division’s programs and services do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the Department of the Interior.

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Contact:
Jim Yurasek
Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs
Phone: 302-577-5170
E-mail: Jim.Yurasek@delaware.gov
Web: http://history.delaware.gov


Video explores Black life in Delaware 1790–1840

(DOVER, Del. — April 29, 2021) — On April 26, 2021, the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs released “A Mere Mock Freedom: Free and Enslaved Black Life in Delaware 1790–1840,” a video presentation by Miles Stanley, a doctoral candidate in history at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. Stanley’s research experience focuses on the history of slavery in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States during the Early Republic (circa 1780–1830). Go to the following link to watch the video on the division’s YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OvpjoyAYfps&ab_channel=DelawareHistory

Screenshot of a historical photo of Delaware
Screenshot from “A Mere Mock Freedom: Free and Enslaved Black Life in Delaware 1790–1840”

“A Mere Mock Freedom” explores anti-slavery activity in Delaware in the late-18th century and the subsequent passage of repressive legislation targeting free Blacks in the 19th century. The presentation takes its name from the writings of U.S. Sen. Thomas Clayton of Delaware (1777–1854) who noted, “Under the wretched and mongrel system of laws which have been enacted in regard to them [free Blacks], they enjoy but a mongrel liberty, a mere mock freedom.”

Due in large part to the passage of laws that criminalized the sale of enslaved Blacks into, and out of, the state in the 1780s and 1790s, the free Black population in Delaware grew nearly four-fold between 1790 and 1840. White pro-slavery Delawareans reacted to this population growth with the passage of legislation that sought to strictly limit the rights of the growing number of free Blacks. These reactionary laws pushed free Blacks to the fringes of society in Delaware, making them targets for kidnapping gangs and other forms of violence.

Screenshot from the Colored American, April 8, 1837
Screenshot from “A Mere Mock Freedom: Free and Enslaved Black Life in Delaware 1790–1840”

The division has been conducting research for many years on the lived experience of Black Delawareans throughout the state’s history. A portion of this research led to the recent archaeological discoveries of an African American burial ground at the John Dickinson Plantation south of Dover and the identification of the remains of the earliest known enslaved people in the state which were found at the Avery’s Rest site outside Rehoboth Beach.

In response to the renewed calls for racial justice that surged across the nation beginning in May 2020, the division issued a statement on race and equity that identified actions that the agency would be taking to practice inclusive history and to tell the stories of all the state’s diverse people. After reading “The Travail of Delaware Slave Families in the Early Republic” by Gary Nash and Miles Stanley, division Director Tim Slavin asked Stanley to create a video presentation on his research.

Commenting on the genesis of “A Mere Mock Freedom,” Stanley noted, “I was fortunate enough to meet the executive director of the Delaware Historical Society, David Young, while I was living in Wilmington and he had worked with one of my mentors, Gary Nash. It really is a small world, I suppose. After I was accepted for the Ph.D., David put me in touch with the HCA [Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs]. They had just started their work on [the African American burial ground at] the John Dickinson Plantation and they needed input on the lived experiences of free and enslaved Blacks during this period. That just so happened to be a big part of my project. After a few meetings … I was asked to produce a recorded presentation that examined a topic related to my research.”

“I hope that we continue to share and discuss these crucial aspects of America’s history,” Stanley added.

Originally from San Diego, Calif., Miles Stanley is a doctoral candidate in history from the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. He is a historian of slavery in the Mid-Atlantic with a particular focus on free and enslaved Black life in Delaware during the Early Republic period. He holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of California, Los Angeles, and a master’s degree from the University of Edinburgh, both in history. In order to get a feel for the history that he was studying, Stanley lived in the Quaker Hill neighborhood of Wilmington, Del. from 2018 to 2019. He and his wife Eva have made their home in Edinburgh since 2020.

Photo of Miles Stanley
Miles Stanley

The Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs is an agency of the State of Delaware. The division enhances Delaware’s quality of life by preserving the state’s unique historical heritage, fostering community stability and economic vitality and providing educational programs and assistance to the general public on Delaware history. The division’s diverse array of services includes operation of five museums which are accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, administration of the State Historic Preservation Office, conservation of the state’s archaeological and historic-objects collections, operation of a conference center and management of historic properties across the state. Primary funding for division programs and services is provided by annual appropriations from the Delaware General Assembly and grants from the National Park Service, Department of the Interior, a federal agency. However, the contents and opinions expressed in the division’s programs and services do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the Department of the Interior.

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Contact:
Jim Yurasek
Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs
Phone: 302-739-7787
E-mail: Jim.Yurasek@delaware.gov
Web: http://history.delaware.gov

Cultural Affairs Division Celebrates Black History

(DOVER, Del. — Jan. 21, 2021) — During the month of February 2021, the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs will be offering five virtual programs streamed live on the Web. Two of these programs will be presented in commemoration of National African American History Month, an annual observance celebrating the invaluable contributions that the Black community has made to the culture and history of the United States. All programs are free and open to the public. Go to the following for additional information and reservation instructions: https://history.delaware.gov/2021/01/21/hca-african-american-history-month-2021.

Photo of Savannah Shepherd
On Feb. 13, 2021, Savannah Shepherd will discuss her work in helping to create a historical marker memorializing the lynching of George White.

Live virtual programs in February 2021

Thursday, Feb. 4, 2021
“The Wreck of the DeBraak.” Virtual program from the Zwaanendael Museum explores the history of the British warship DeBraak which sank off the coast of Lewes in May of 1798 only to be recovered by treasure hunters nearly 200 years later. 3:30 p.m. 302-645-1148 or mailto:zmuseum@delaware.gov.

Saturday, Feb. 6, 2021
“Mary Ann Shadd Cary: Delaware’s Forgotten Daughter.” Virtual presentation from the New Castle Court House Museum featuring Lora Englehart of Delaware Humanities discussing the life of Wilmington native Mary Ann Shadd Cary (1823-1893), a teacher, journalist, editor, feminist, lawyer, wife and mother who lived a life committed to racial and gender equality. Presented in celebration of African American History Month. 1 p.m. 302-323-4453 or mailto:NCCHmuseum@delaware.gov.

Photo of Mary Ann Shadd Cary
Mary Ann Shadd Cary

Saturday, Feb. 13, 2021
“A Student’s Quest for Racial Reckoning in Delaware.” Virtual program from the Zwaanendael Museum in which Savannah Shepherd discusses the journey that led her to collaborate with the Equal Justice Initiative’s Community Remembrance Project that installed a marker in memoriam of the lynching of George White. Presented in celebration of African American History Month. 3:30 p.m. 302-645-1148 or mailto:zmuseum@delaware.gov.

Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021
Delaware State Review Board for Historic Preservation meeting. Virtual meeting to include review of the African Union Church of Iron Hill’s nomination to the National Register of Historic Places: 10 a.m. 302-736-7417.

Saturday, Feb. 27, 2021
“Remembering Washington.” Virtual living-history program from The Old State House in which historical interpreter Tom Welch portrays Col. Allen McLane, the Revolutionary War hero from Duck Creek (Smyrna, Del.). As part of the program, McLane will discuss his decades-long relationship with George Washington. Co-sponsored by the Friends of Old Dover. Program streamed live via Zoom or on the museum’s Facebook page. 10 a.m. 302-744-5054 or mailto:OSHmuseum@delaware.gov.

 

Administered by the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs, the five museums of the State of Delaware—the John Dickinson Plantation, the Johnson Victrola Museum, the New Castle Court House Museum, The Old State House and the Zwaanendael Museum—tell the story of the First State’s contributions to the history and culture of the United States. Through tours, exhibits, and special programs, the museums shine a spotlight on Delaware’s unique history and the diverse people who came to live there. The museums are accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. The New Castle Court House Museum and the John Dickinson Plantation are partner sites of the First State National Historical Park. The Old State House is located on the Dover Green, another partner site of the park. Go to the following for a long-term calendar of division-sponsored events.

Picture of the Logo of the American Alliance of Museums

 

The Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs is an agency of the State of Delaware. The division enhances Delaware’s quality of life by preserving the state’s unique historical heritage, fostering community stability and economic vitality and providing educational programs and assistance to the general public on Delaware history. The division’s diverse array of services includes operation of five museums, administration of the State Historic Preservation Office, conservation of the state’s archaeological and historic-objects collections, operation of a conference center and management of historic properties across the state. Primary funding for division programs and services is provided by annual appropriations from the Delaware General Assembly and grants from the National Park Service, Department of the Interior, a federal agency. However, the contents and opinions expressed in the division’s programs and services do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the Department of the Interior.

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Contact:
Jim Yurasek
Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs
Phone: 302-608-5326
E-mail: Jim.Yurasek@delaware.gov
Web: http://history.delaware.gov