I-95 Drive to Save Lives & Drive to Save Lives across Delaware – April 9th to 10th, 2021

Delaware- In 2014 the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) initiated the “Drive to Save Lives” campaign to reduce deaths on U.S. highways. The campaign targeted distracted and impaired driving, speeding, the use of seatbelts and the unsafe driving behaviors of operators of large trucks and buses. A combination of education and awareness, partnering with other agencies, and high-visibility traffic enforcement were used to achieve the campaign goals. These successful efforts gave the IACP a desire to continue the campaign annually.

Delaware State Police have coordinated the “Drive to Save Lives” efforts at least once a year, specifically on Delaware’s portion of I-95 for the past several years. Working alongside DSP there are 14 other participating state police and highway patrol agencies that patrol portions of I-95. Over the past four years DSP has taken their campaign coordination efforts a step further. In 2017, DSP began requesting other Delaware law enforcement agencies having patrol-related duties to be included in the campaign. As a result, numerous agencies throughout the state have been participating in this campaign. This year is proving to become the greatest teamwork effort with at least 30 Delaware municipal agencies slated to participate in the April 9th and 10th campaign.

Delaware’s Office of Highway Safety has continued to be a supporter of the “Drive to Save Lives” campaign. All law enforcement agencies, along with the Office of Highway Safety, are looking forward to working together during April’s campaign. With the Office of Highway Safety’s assistance, Delaware’s participating law enforcement agencies are better able to supply personnel for these high-visibility patrols.

The Delaware Office of Highway Safety is pleased to support the Delaware State Police and municipal agencies from across the state in the “Drive to Save Lives” initiative. This is an opportunity for Delaware to participate in a nationwide event, focusing on multiple highway safety priorities, using data-driven enforcement methods and education to decrease the high-risk behaviors of drivers. These partners are committed to decreasing fatalities and serious injuries on our roadways and it’s initiatives like this that can help us achieve that goal,” Sarah Cattie, Traffic Safety Program Manager, Delaware Office of Highway Safety.

The Delaware State Police will be coordinating the I-95 effort, as well as the portion of the campaign that extends to other roadways throughout the state. DSP will be patrolling the state’s main corridors, while the municipal agencies will be patrolling their specific jurisdictions. The team of agencies will be highly motivated to perform traffic stops, educate operators, and issue citations. The ultimate goal is to provide education and enforcement that will lead to a decrease in the number of crashes throughout Delaware not only on April 9th and 10th, but into the future.

The Delaware State Police are proud to partner with our allied agencies around the State in the 2021 Drive to Save Lives campaign.  While utilizing education and proactive enforcement strategies, Troopers will engage motorists each day with the intention to enhance driver safety and reduce fatal and serious injury collisions.   Along with our highway safety partners, we are dedicated to this nationwide effort and to our shared goals of keeping Delawareans and our visitors safe.”  Colonel Melissa Zebley, Superintendent of the Delaware State Police

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About the Delaware Office of Highway Safety
The Office of Highway Safety (OHS) is committed to improving the safety of Delaware’s motoring public by focusing on behavioral traffic safety issues, such as impaired driving, seat belt use, speeding, child passenger safety, pedestrian and bicycle safety, motorcycle safety, and teen driving issues. Follow the Delaware Office of Highway Safety on ArriveAliveDE.com, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat.


Motorcycle Crashes Spike in Delaware May 2019

ngg_shortcode_0_placeholderDelaware (May 28, 2019) – The Delaware Office of Highway Safety, Delaware State Police, Delaware Department of Transportation, and AAA Mid-Atlantic are working together to notify the public about the recent spike in motorcycle crash fatalities in Delaware. Since January 1st, 2019 there have been six motorcycle fatalities across the state all within the month of May and all under 42 years of age. In all fatal cases listed speed is the number one contributing factor.

“Throughout the year especially during this time when it gets warmer we see more preventable speed-related crashes. It is imperative to know that split second critical decisions are made by motorcyclists that impact every driver on our roads. Through better decisions, education, and enforcement we can work together to make a difference to reduce Delaware fatalities,” Sergeant Richard Bratz, Director of the Delaware State Police Public Information Office.

Motorcycle Fatal and Non-Fatal Crashes from January 1st to May 27, 2019:

32 motorcycle crashes + 5 fatal crashes = 37 crashes

40 motorcycle injuries (not including fatals)

6 motorcycle fatalities

  • Monday, May 27, 2019, 11:18 p.m. – (1 Fatality) DE-5 south of DE-24 (Oak Orchard area) – A helmeted motorcyclist was reportedly speeding and lost control when trying to pass another vehicle. Alcohol use is pending on the motorcyclist.
  • Monday, May 27, 2019, 12:19 a.m. – (2 Fatalities) on I-95 southbound south of Jackson Street (Wilmington city area) – A motorcyclist was reportedly speeding and driving recklessly on I-95 southbound in the area and struck a Toyota Sienna, ejecting both the driver and passenger (both helmeted, landing on the shoulder). Alcohol use is pending on the motorcycle driver.  Also, the motorcycle driver did not have a valid license.
  • Friday, May 24, 2019, 11:07 p.m. – (1 Fatality) US-202 at Fairfax Boulevard (Fairfax Area) – Contributing Circumstance: A helmeted motorcyclist was reportedly speeding and driving recklessly on US-202 northbound in the area and a 69-year-old driver attempted to turn left, where the motorcycle entered his path. Alcohol use is pending on the motorcyclist.
  • Saturday, May 18, 2019, 8:47 p.m. – (1 Fatality) US-13 northbound north of Federal School Lane (New Castle area) – A car was attempting to make a U-turn from US-13 southbound to US-13 northbound at a crossover and struck a helmeted motorcyclist. Speed is suspected on part of the motorcyclist and impairment analysis is pending.
  • Sunday, May 5, 2019, 2:06 a.m. – (1 Fatality) DE-9 at the C&D Canal, (Delaware City area) – This crash involved a 20-year-old motorcyclist who was traveling on the Reedy Point Bridge who crossed the center line, striking a vehicle in the opposite direction and was ejected. Speed and impairment appear to be factors for the motorcyclist.

“Motorcyclists are vulnerable drivers on our roadways. It’s up to both riders and motorists to share the road according to Delaware laws that are put into place to ensure that everyone arrives at their destination safely,” Sarah Cattie, Motorcycle Traffic Safety Program Manager, Delaware Office of Highway Safety

AAA, OHS, DelDOT and DSP Provide Safety Tips:

One of the most common reasons drivers give for cutting off or pulling out in front of a motorcycle is that they “didn’t see it.”

Bikers can prevent crashes and injuries by:

  • Reducing speeds and/or maintaining safer speeds
  • Keeping headlights and marker and taillights on at dusk and in dark or rainy weather
  • Staying three to four seconds behind a vehicle they intend to pass, checking oncoming traffic from the left side of the lane, signaling the intention to turn, and then checking for oncoming traffic before passing.
  • Checking their rearview mirror and quickly turn their head to ensure the vehicle is a safe distance behind them when completing a pass.
  • Wearing helmets that meet a high protection standard.
  • Wearing proper clothing, eyewear, and sturdy, closed-toe footwear.

Motorists can help to make the roads safer for motorcyclists by taking some simple precautions:

  • Be extra cautious on weekends, when more motorcyclists take to the road.
  • Provide motorcyclists adequate room to maneuver. Follow at least three to four seconds behind them.
  • Allow extra maneuvering room in areas with potholes, pavement transitions, and railroad crossings. Motorcyclists may need to slow down, stop or adjust their lane position.
  • Never try to share a lane with a motorcycle. Motorcycles have the same right to lanes as any other vehicle.
  • If a motorcycle is nearby, check your mirrors carefully before changing lanes. Motorcycles may be in your blind spots or difficult to see because of their smaller size.

“Road safety is everyone’s responsibility, whether driving a car, truck, or motorcycle and whether we are drivers, passengers, or pedestrians, it’s important for all of us to be aware of others using our roads and to follow basic safety policies while using our public roads,” said Ken Grant, Public and Government Affairs Manager for AAA Mid-Atlantic. 

“There are nearly 22,000 motorcycles registered in Delaware and by following the rules of the road – obeying the speed limit, not driving distracted, and not driving under the influence, the risk of being involved in a crash is greatly reduced for anyone operating a motor vehicle and the surrounding motorists,” said Secretary of Transportation Jennifer Cohan.  

Safer motorcycle rides start with respect. Check out the Office of Highway Safety’s Motorcycle Safety website at ArriveAliveDE.com/Motorcycle-Safety and find out where you can take the Motorcycle Rider Safety Course, popular routes for riders throughout the state of Delaware, and check the street smarts section that teaches you how to conduct a pre-ride check called T-CLOCS. While you’re visiting, check out the video section featuring some of Delaware’s riders as they talk about the freedom of owning a bike and why motorcycle safety is so important. Whether you’re an experienced rider or a novice, you could learn something here that could save your ride—and maybe even your life. The motorcycle safety rider quiz takes less than a few minutes. Go to: ArriveAliveDE.com/Motorcycle-Safety/Rider-Quiz.

  • To keep motorcyclists safe, OHS urges everyone to share the road and be alert. We’re reminding motorcyclists to make themselves visible, use DOT-compliant motorcycle helmets, and to always ride sober.
  • Make sure you are properly licensed. Check out the DMV Motorcycle Endorsement at Dmv.de.gov/services/driver_services/drivers_license/dr_lic_motorcycle.shtml.
  • Look twice, before you proceed. Then look again. Cars are easier to spot than motorcycles.
  • When turning left, ensure there is enough time and space for the motorcyclist to clear the roadway before you initiate the left turn.
  • Protect yourself with the proper motorcycle safety gear.

The next OHS motorcycle safety awareness community engagement event will be the Hammer Down for Habitat Motorcycle Ride and Community Day on June 8th, 2019. OHS will be on-site at the American Legion in Smyrna beginning at 9 a.m. with games, a selfie station, and information pertaining to respecting your ride. For more information, go to https://business.facebook.com/events/2317175238567234/.

You can follow the Delaware Office of Highway Safety by clicking on:

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About the Delaware Office of Highway Safety (DOHS)
The Office of Highway Safety (OHS) is committed to improving the safety of Delaware’s motoring public by focusing on behavioral traffic safety issues such as impaired driving, seat belt use, speeding, child passenger safety, pedestrian and bicycle safety, motorcycle safety, and teen driving issues. FAQs can be found at ArriveAliveDE.com.

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‘Share the Road’ Campaign Aims to Increase Motorcycle Safety Awareness for All Road Users

Dover –The Delaware Office of Highway Safety (OHS), along with state and local law enforcement are reminding motorists to Share The Road, and reminding motorcyclists to Respect Your Ride. From May 22nd to June 6th, law enforcement across the state will be patrolling high crash roadways ensuring that both motorists and motorcyclists are sharing the road and ensuring that motorcyclists are complying with the state’s motorcycle safety laws.

The Share The Road campaign is aimed at motorists to be extra alert and to keep an eye out for motorcyclists on Delaware roadways.   Motorists are reminded to allow for more following distance between you and the motorcyclists and allow a motorcyclist the full lane width, do not try to share the lane. Although it may seem that there is enough room in the traffic lane for a motor vehicle and a motorcycle, the motorcycle needs the room to maneuver safely.

The Respect Your Ride campaign, aimed at motorcyclists, directs riders to www.MotorcyclesafetyDE.org, where they can find information about the proper tools and training to make them the safest rider they can be, as well as popular riding routes in Delaware and links on how to apply for a motorcycle license. OHS also posted a series of interviews with riders about their riding experience, training, and tips for other riders to promote safe riding and to also give insight to motorists about what it is like to ride in Delaware.

Over the last five years, motorcycle fatalities averaged 12 percent of all total fatalities in Delaware. Delaware has seen 4 motorcycle fatalities this year compared to 7 at this time last year. Saturday trends as the day when most fatalities and injuries occur on a motorcycle. Alcohol use among riders is also a contributing factor to crashes and fatalities. Thirty-six percent of motorcycle riders who were killed in the last five years were impaired.

“Wearing a helmet is an important way for a motorcyclist to stay safe, but we all play a part. It’s up to all motorists and motorcyclists to make our roads safer,” said Jana Simpler, Director for the Office of Highway Safety. “All road users need to share the responsibility of keeping the roadways safe. By following road signs, obeying speed limits, and always staying focused on the road, deaths will be prevented.”

Tips for drivers to prevent a crash with a motorcycle:

  • Though a motorcycle is a small vehicle, its operator still has all the rights of the road as any other motorist. Allow the motorcycle the full width of a lane at all times.
  • Always signal when changing lanes or merging with traffic.
  • If you see a motorcycle with a signal on, be careful. Motorcycle signals are often non-canceling and could have been forgotten. Always ensure that the motorcycle is turning before proceeding.
  • Check all mirrors and blind spots for motorcycles before changing lanes or merging with traffic, especially at intersections.
  • Always allow more following distance – three to four seconds – when behind a motorcycle. This gives them more time to maneuver or stop in an emergency.
  • Never drive distracted or impaired.

Motorcyclists must also take precautions to remain safe on the road. Increase your safety by following these steps:

  • Wear a DOT-compliant helmet and other protective gear.
  • Obey all traffic laws and be properly licensed.
  • Use hand and turn signals at every lane change or turn.
  • Wear brightly colored clothes and reflective tape to increase visibility.
  • Ride in the middle of the lane where you will be more visible to drivers.
  • Never ride distracted or impaired.

“By following basic safety rules, we can all help prevent crashes,” said Simpler. “Our message is for all drivers and riders: Share the responsibility of keeping our roads safe—always share the road.”

Law enforcement agencies participating in the May 22nd to June 6th mobilization include Blades PD, Camden PD, Clayton PD, Dewey Beach PD, Dover PD, Laurel PD, Milford PD, Millsboro PD, New Castle City PD, New Castle County PD, Newark PD, Newport PD, Rehoboth Beach PD, Seaford PD, Smyrna PD, and DSP.

For more information on any of the OHS campaigns visit www.ohs.delaware.gov and follow regular campaign updates on Twitter at www.twitter.com/DEHighwaySafe and Facebook www.facebook.com/ArriveAliveDE.


Motorcycle Safety Enforcement Begins September 11th

Dover –The Delaware Office of Highway Safety (OHS) along with state and local law enforcement are reminding motorists and motorcyclists alike to See & Be Seen during Delmarva Bike Week.  From September 11th to 15th, law enforcement across the state will be patrolling high crash roadways ensuring that both motorists and motorcyclists are riding and driving safe and sharing the road.  Motorists are reminded to look twice for motorcyclists before pulling out from an intersection or cross roads and motorcyclists are reminded that they need to comply with the state’s motorcycle safety laws including having the proper motorcycle endorsement on their license.

Agencies participating in the increased enforcement include Bethany Beach PD, Dewey Beach PD, Dover PD, Fenwick Island PD, Georgetown PD, Lewes PD, Milford PD, Milton PD, New Castle County PD, Newark PD, Rehoboth Beach PD, and DSP.

To date Delaware has experienced 15 motorcycle fatalities compared to 14 at this time last year.

Tips for drivers on how to prevent a fatal crash with a motorcycle;

  • Though a motorcycle is a small vehicle, its operator still has all the rights of the road as any other motorist. Allow the motorcycle the full width of a lane at all times.
  • Always signal when changing lanes or merging with traffic.
  • If you see a motorcycle with a signal on, be careful: motorcycle signals are often non-canceling and could have been forgotten. Always ensure that the motorcycle is turning before proceeding.
  • Check all mirrors and blind spots for motorcycles before changing lanes or merging with traffic, especially at intersections.
  • Always allow more following distance – three to four seconds – when behind a motorcycle. This gives them more time to maneuver or stop in an emergency.
  • Never drive distracted or impaired.

Motorcyclists can increase their safety by following these steps:

  • Wear a DOT-compliant helmet and other protective gear.
  • Obey all traffic laws and be properly licensed.
  • Use hand and turn signals at every lane change or turn.
  • Wear brightly colored clothes and reflective tape to increase visibility.
  • Ride in the middle of the lane where you will be more visible to drivers.
  • Never ride distracted or impaired.

For more information visit www.MotorcycleSafetyDE.org and follow regular campaign updates on Twitter at www.twitter.com/DEHighwaySafe and Facebook www.facebook.com/ArriveAliveDE.


Highway Safety Officials Stress Traffic Enforcement

Dover – The Office of Highway Safety (OHS) is stressing the importance of traffic safety after a deadly first week in July and reminding motorists law enforcement officers are out enforcing these laws to help protect the public and save lives.  Several enforcement campaigns are in effect to address speeding, impaired driving, motorcycle safety, pedestrian safety and seat belt use; most of which were a factor in the crashes last week.  Between July 1 and July 6, there were 347 crashes across the state that resulted in 4 fatalities and 113 injuries. Those killed included 1 motorcyclist and 3 other drivers.

Speed and motorcycle enforcement continues until July 12th; seat belt enforcement is scheduled from July 18-31; the pedestrian safety campaign is scheduled from July 10-25 and impaired driving enforcement continues with Checkpoint Strikeforce each week through the end of the year.

A sobriety checkpoint is scheduled for Friday July 11 in Bear.  Last week a total of 86 drivers were arrested for driving under the influence in Delaware.  To date over 2,000 DUI arrests have been made since January 1st 2014.

Motorcycle safety continues to be a major concern for safety official, as there have been 13 motorcycle fatalities this year compared to 8 at this time last year.  Helmet use among motorcyclists has declined.  Of those killed this year only 23% were wearing a helmet compared to 75% last year.  Although Delaware law does not require a rider to wear a helmet, it does require a helmet to be on the motorcycle.  According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), in 2012 in the U.S., 1,699 lives were saved by motorcycle helmet use.

Delaware also continues the pedestrian safety campaign in Sussex and New Castle counties, urging pedestrians to use crosswalks, sidewalks, and to be visible to motorists in low light or dark conditions.  Officers will be patrolling high pedestrian crash locations and stopping pedestrians who are not walking or crossing safely. Officers will provide the pedestrians with an educational flyer with safe walking tips included.  They will also answer any questions about the pedestrian safety law. There have been 150 pedestrian-involved crashes this year, resulting in 129 pedestrians injured and 9 pedestrians killed.  The majority of these involved pedestrian error, such as stepping into the path of a vehicle or not crossing in a crosswalk or marked intersection.

Speed has also been a factor in many of the crashes this year.  When speeding is coupled with impaired driving, distracted driving, disregarding traffic signals, or other traffic offenses, crashes are more likely to end in fatalities.  The OHS speed campaign is implementing new education and outreach tactics to get motorists to Slow Down and Arrive Alive.  These including working with businesses across the state to place large life-sized signs in high profile locations, posting reminders on social media, and making answers to frequently asked questions available through social media as well.

“Law enforcement officers are writing tickets to save lives,” said Alison Kirk, Community Relations Officer for OHS.  “If you receive a ticket we hope you will pause for a moment the next time you get in your vehicle, remember why you received the ticket and change the behavior that led to the ticket. Yes it may hurt your pocket to pay a fine, but it hurts a lot less than being in the hospital.”

Recently an Elsmere police officer pulled over an 18 year old male for not wearing his seat belt and gave him a ticket.  That same 18 year old, who just graduated from high school, was involved in a serious crash a few days later.  This time he was wearing his seat belt.  His mother, speaking with the investigating officer at the hospital, was aware of her son’s recent seat belt ticket and felt certain that ticket saved his life by making him buckle up.

OHS reminds all drivers to go back to the basics of driving safety:  slow down, don’t drink and drive and always buckle up.  Avoid using illicit, prescription, or over-the-counter drugs before driving.  Plan extra time to get to any destination so you don’t let traffic frustration cause you to make a bad decision behind the wheel.

For updates follow OHS on Twitter @DEHighwaySafe, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ArriveAliveDE. Campaign specific information can be found at www.DUIrealtime.com, www.BuckleUpDE.org, www.MotorcycleSafetyDE.org.  NHTSA motorcycle information can be found at www.NHTSA.gov/Safety/Motorcycles.