Delaware Natural Resources Police Youth Fishing Tournament Winners Announced

Statewide Youth Fishing Tournament winner Onna Crowley, center, with OFC Callie Crouse, left, and Sr. Cpl. Adam Rourk, right, caught 18.8 pounds of fish from Lums Pond.

 

Tournament Marks 36th Year of Introducing Youth to Sport of Fishing

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control today announced the winners of the Delaware Natural Resources Police’s 36th annual Youth Fishing Tournament, held Saturday, June 4. After remotely-reported catch-and-release competitions the last two years due to the pandemic, the tournament returned with on-site tournament weighmasters at three locations across the state attended by more than 200 youth anglers: Ingrams Pond in Sussex County, Akridge Scout Reservation in Kent County, and Lums Pond in New Castle County.

Tournament participants ages 4 through 15 weighed their catches as they competed for the title of overall state winner along with trying to land each county’s top catch and age group titles. The overall winner and champion this year was Onna Crowley, age 13, of Clayton, who caught 18.80 pounds of fish at Lums Pond, including the biggest fish caught of the day, a 12.1-pound carp.

This year’s county winners and the overall statewide winner will be invited to a special trophy presentation on Governor’s Day at the 2022 Delaware State Fair in Harrington.

New Castle County Winners

Other New Castle County winners at Lums Pond, by age group and total weight of fish caught, were:

Ages 4 through 7:
First place – Myracle White, 2.29 pounds
Second place – Claire Baron, 2.23 pounds
Third place – Michael Hopkins, 0.93 pounds

Ages 8 through 11:
First place – Gabriel Alfaro, 12.14 pounds
Second place – Ace Ginevan, 3.32 pounds
Third place – Ava Ginevan, 1.36 pounds

Ages 12 through 15:
First place – Russell Reed, 7.92 pounds
Second place – Tyler Harvell, 2.82 pounds
Third place – Cody Wiseman, 2.55 pounds

Kent County Winners

At Akridge Scout Reservation, Dominic Webb was the day’s overall winner with a total of 5.25 pounds of fish. Other Kent County winners were:

Ages 4 through 7:
First place – Kohen Marvel, 2.60 pounds
Second place – Hunter Hickman, 2.09 pounds
Third place – Virginia Wallace, 2.00 pounds

Ages 8 through 11:
First place – Collin Meisinger, 4.45 pounds
Second place – Cole Smith, 2.56 pounds
Third place – Matthew DeCarlo, 2.02 pounds

Ages 12 through 15:
First place – Kirra Noble, 4.37 pounds
Second place – Evan Knutsen, 3.69 pounds
Third place – Gianna Velazquez, 3.11 pounds

Sussex County Winners

At Ingram’s Pond in Sussex County, Brody Spencer was the day’s overall winner with a total of 7.19 pounds of fish. Other Sussex County winners were:

Ages 4 through 7:
First place – Tristen Wertz, 3.17 pounds
Second place – Caden Timmons, 1.76 pounds
Third place – Lexi Briggs, 0.76 pounds

Ages 8 through 11:
First place – John Timmons, 2.29 pounds
Second place – Owen Laux, 1.91 pounds
Third place – Zachary Thompson, 1.59 pounds

Ages 12 through 15:
First place – Landon Elliot, 0.26 pounds

The Youth Fishing Tournament was established to introduce youth to the sport of fishing and to teach the catch-and-release approach to conservation. More information on the Youth Fishing Tournament can be found at de.gov/yft.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities, and educates Delawareans about the environment. The DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife conserves and manages Delaware’s fish and wildlife and their habitats, and provides fishing, hunting, wildlife viewing and boating access on nearly 68,000 acres of public land. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contact: Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov


DPH Community Assessments Underway to Inform Future COVID-19 Response Efforts and Improve Health

DOVER, DE (Jan. 25, 2022) – The Delaware Division of Public Health (DPH) will conduct a series of community health assessments to better understand the concerns and needs of Delaware communities during the COVID-19 pandemic and to improve the overall health in Delaware in the future. As part of Delaware’s State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP), DPH has partnered with the University of Delaware’s Partnership for Healthy Communities and Epidemiology Program to conduct a survey in each of Delaware’s three counties.

Households who have been randomly selected to participate in the voluntary survey will receive a postcard in the mail followed by a survey packet with instructions on how to complete the survey online or by mail. Incentives will be provided for completed surveys. The first set of survey packets will be mailed to Kent County households this week. In late February, teams of students and community volunteers will canvas Kent County neighborhoods to knock on the doors of those selected households who haven’t completed the survey by mail or online. Similar assessments will occur for New Castle and Sussex counties over the next two months. The dates for survey mailings and canvassing by county are:

Surveying begins:

  • Kent County – week of Jan 24
  • New Castle County – week of Feb. 7
  • Sussex County – week of Feb. 21

Canvassing begins:

  • Kent County – Feb. 25
  • New Castle County – March 11
  • Sussex County – March 25

The SHIP helps to prioritize areas, such as chronic disease, maternal and child health, mental health, and substance use disorder, where more work is needed to make Delawareans healthier.

“Delaware’s current five-year State Health Improvement Plan covers 2018 through 2023 and was initially developed prior to the pandemic,” said DPH Director Dr. Karyl Rattay. “Community assessments related to COVID-19 and broader conditions now impacting the health of Delawareans are critical to helping inform the current plan and guide the next state health needs assessment and planning process.”

“We are grateful that our students have the opportunity to gain real-world experience by conducting a Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER), in Delaware for the first time,” said Dr. Jennifer Horney, founding director of the Epidemiology Program at University of Delaware. “It is important that these students, who are the State’s future public health workforce, embrace working directly with residents and communities to collect data that can be used for decision-making by public health leaders and emergency managers.”

In addition to community assessments being conducted at the household level to assess COVID-19 mitigation efforts, perceptions of risk, and preventative actions taken by Delaware households, two series of Community Conversations are also being planned to learn more about broader health impacts on communities. 

“These community conversations are being planned at a time when the federal government is making unprecedented investments in state, territorial, Tribal, and local governments” said Rita Landgraf, director of the Partnership for Healthy Communities at University of Delaware. “Never have communities had access to direct, flexible dollars at this scale. Not only can these resources assist with recovery from the pandemic, but they can also support communities in creating more equitable conditions for health and renewal. Working in collaboration with local partners across the state, we believe that it is possible to engage communities in dialogues that amplify their voices, increase equity, and inform community investments differently.”

The purpose of the Delaware State Health Improvement Plan is to describe how the Division of Public Health and the community it serves will work together to improve the health of Delaware’s population. The SHIP helps to prioritize areas, such as chronic disease, maternal and child health, mental health, and substance use disorder, where more work is needed to make Delawareans healthier. The National Public Health Accreditation Board explains, “Communities, stakeholders, and partners can use the SHIP to set priorities, direct the use of resources, and develop and implement projects, programs, and policies.” Effective state health improvement plans also continuously incorporate new information or data into the state health needs assessment and make updates as needed.

To learn more about Delaware’s State Health Improvement Plan, visit www.DelawareSHIP.org

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Anyone who is deaf, hard of hearing, Deaf-Blind or speech disabled can contact DPH by dialing 711 first using specialized devices (i.e., TTY, TeleBraille, voice devices). The 711 service is free and to learn more about how it works, please visit delawarerelay.com.

The Delaware Department of Health and Social Services is committed to improving the quality of the lives of Delaware’s citizens by promoting health and well-being, fostering self-sufficiency, and protecting vulnerable populations.


Presenting Our Newest Delaware Historical Marker: Henry Clay Village

 

The Delaware Public Archives formally dedicated a new Delaware Historical Marker on Tuesday, August 31, 2021, that commemorates the community of Henry Clay Village in Wilmington, Delaware. The marker acknowledges the residents of the community and notes the formation of this village that grew up around powder manufacturing near the textile mills north of Wilmington. The marker was unveiled near Breck’s Mill, Montchanin, Delaware, with more than forty guests in attendance.

 

In the photo: (Left to right) Stephen M. Marz, Director & State Archivist, Delaware Public Archives; Gerald Brady, State Representative; Jill MacKenzie, Executive Director, Hagley Museum & Library; and Phillip Leach, Local Historian & Delaware Historical Marker Requestor. 


Christina River Watershed Cleanup Extended to May 15

To encourage northern Delaware volunteers to get outside and clean up, the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control in partnership with the Christina Conservancy has extended the month-long Christina River Watershed Cleanup campaign an extra two weeks through Saturday, May 15. The date coincides with the Wilmington Community Cleanup Day taking place in neighborhoods throughout the city.

The 2021 Christina Cleanup campaign mobilizes volunteers to safely clean up their communities by picking up trash in their own neighborhoods, on beaches and along waterways within northern New Castle County, from Brandywine Hundred south through Glasgow and Bear. No pre-registration is needed for this year’s campaign. Volunteers are asked to clean up debris, like cigarette butts, beverage containers, food wrappers and more, that easily end up in waterways and ultimately in the ocean.

While large groups are discouraged, volunteers will have greater freedom to select when, where, and how often their household participates. They can see locations, document their findings and share photos in the cleanup’s mobile-friendly online volunteer hub at Christina Cleanup Campaign.

Volunteers can also find ideas about how to get involved in the 2021 Christina River Watershed Cleanup on Facebook and Twitter. Volunteers can post photos on facebook.com/ChristinaCleanup for a chance to win a 2021 Delaware State Parks pass. Each photo post counts as an entry. Volunteers can post as often as they like throughout the month.

Important Reminders:

  • Pick up trash near your home along streets, roadways, and in natural areas and open spaces.
  • Know your limitations and be aware of possibly hazardous areas, including along roadways, streambanks, and steep or slippery slopes.
  • Pack a disposable bag and rubber gloves whenever you take a walk or go hiking, to collect and carry out trash you find along the way.
  • Always Recycle Right. Only recycle clean items through curbside recycling or designated drop-off locations. Items with lots of dirt or grit attached or inside should be placed in your household trash.

Avoid These Actions:

  • Don’t enter private property without permission of the landowner.
  • Don’t place yourself in any danger while volunteering for the Christina River Cleanup.
  • Don’t collect any trash that your household waste hauler might not accept. Tires, construction materials, and metal drums may be unacceptable.

For more information, visit Christina River Watershed Cleanup or email ChristinaRiverCleanup@gmail.com.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Joanna Wilson, Joanna.wilson@delaware.gov, Nikki Lavoie, nikki.lavoie@delaware.gov

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Upstate Stream Trout Season to Open Early

Anglers Encouraged to Practice Social Distancing; Trout Streams Closed to All Fishing from March 14 Until Opening

Delaware’s 2021 upstate stream trout season will open early to minimize opening day crowds and accommodate responsible outdoor recreation during the current coronavirus (COVID-19) period. The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control encourages anglers to practice social distancing while fishing, which is currently six feet from other individuals, approximately the length of some fishing rods. Plans are subject to change based on health and safety considerations, and any further restrictions or changes to the season will be announced.

Trout fishing will be allowed for only youth anglers under age 16 on Sunday, March 28, followed by the opening of the regular trout season for all anglers on Monday, March 29, with fishing allowed both days from 7 a.m. to one half-hour after sunset unless otherwise restricted by area rules. Adults accompanying youth anglers on March 28 are not allowed to fish that day.

White Clay Creek, Red Clay Creek, Christina Creek, Pike Creek, Beaver Run, Wilson Run and Mill Creek will be stocked prior to the season with thousands of rainbow and brown trout, including some trophy-sized fish. Trout stocking is planned to continue weekly at White Clay Creek and periodically at the other streams during April.

To improve trout fishing when the season opens, stocked trout streams are closed to all fishing from Sunday, March 14 through Saturday, March 27 to accommodate trout stocking, eliminate incidental hooking of trout and allow stocked trout time to adjust to their new waters.

Trout anglers planning to fish the upstate trout streams should note the following rules and regulations:

  • A Delaware fishing license is required, unless an angler is exempt.
  • A Delaware trout stamp is required until June 30, unless an angler is exempt.
  • Following the 7 a.m. start on the special youth-only day and on opening day, trout fishing at these streams is open one half-hour before sunrise to one half-hour after sunset unless otherwise restricted by area rules.
  • The daily possession limit is six trout, except inside or within 50 feet of the designated fly-fishing-only section of White Clay Creek where the daily possession limit is four trout.

Proceeds from the purchase of Delaware trout stamps are used to help purchase trout for stocking next year. This popular fishery is also supported by federal Sport Fish Restoration funds administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that are generated from anglers purchasing fishing equipment.

Delaware fishing licenses and trout stamps are sold online at de.gov/fishinglicense and by license agents statewide, listed online at de.gov/LicenseAgents. For additional information on Delaware fishing licenses, call the DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife licensing office at 302-739-9918.

Additional trout fishing information is available at de.gov/trout. Information on fishing in Delaware is available in the Delaware Fishing Guide or by calling the Division of Fish and Wildlife Fisheries Section at 302-739-9914.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities, and educates Delawareans about the environment. The Division of Fish and Wildlife conserves and manages Delaware’s fish and wildlife and their habitats, and provides fishing, hunting, wildlife viewing and boating access on nearly 65,000 acres of public land. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Joanna Wilson, joanna.wilson@delaware.gov; Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov