Delaware Animal Services Seeks Tips In Dog Abandonment Case Resulting In Death

***WARNING: GRAPHIC IMAGE BELOW. MAY TRIGGER.***

 

 

 

DOVER, DE (Aug. 5) – The Office of Animal Welfare’s (OAW) Delaware Animal Services (DAS) is seeking the public’s help with providing any information that may lead to identifying the person responsible for abandoning a dog that was found clinging to life earlier this week. The dog was found in the brush, off North Little Creek Road in Dover, by DelDOT workers who immediately contacted DAS.  

OAW officers responded to the call and found the dog barely responsive. They rushed her to a local veterinary hospital for care. The emaciated dog lost most of her hair and was covered in sores and scabs. Despite best efforts to save her, she subsequently died from her condition. DAS is now seeking any tips from the public that may help find the person or persons responsible for this terrible act.

The female, medium-sized dog was left in a crate in very tall weeds set back off the road near the Route 1 overpass. She is estimated to be approximately two years old, had very long nails and was wearing a blue, orange, and white striped collar. She did not have a microchip. 

Due to her condition, the breed of dog could not be determined. Anyone with any information is urged to contact Delaware Animal Services at 302-255-4646 or online at animalservices.delaware.gov. Tips may be made anonymously. 

Unforeseen life events such as financial hardships, health concerns or behavioral problems may force Delawareans to give up a beloved pet. OAW provides assistance to pet owners to prevent similar circumstances from happening. Visit https://www.dhss.delaware.gov/dhss/dph/oaw/rehomingdog.html for more information.

 

Delaware Animal Services Seeks Tips In Dog Abandonment Case Resulting In Death
Delaware Animal Services Seeks Tips In Dog Abandonment Case Resulting In Death


Dr. Karyl Rattay Announces Departure From Delaware Division Of Public Health Effective June 30, 2022

DOVER, DE (MAY 13, 2022) – Today, Dr. Karyl Rattay is announcing that she will be leaving her role as Director of the Delaware Division of Public Health (DPH) effective June 30, 2022.  Dr. Rattay assumed her position in 2009, during the H1N1 influenza pandemic, and is the nation’s longest serving Public Health Director.

As Delaware’s State Health Official, Dr. Rattay leads nearly 1,000 employees who promote health, reduce health inequities, and protect Delawareans from disease, environmental hazards, and public health emergencies.

“It has been the greatest honor of my lifetime to serve Delawareans in this role, said Dr. Rattay. “I am grateful for the opportunity to have served under Governor Carney, and Governor Markell before him.  I could not be prouder of the DPH team and what we have accomplished together over the past 13 years.”

“When you work with someone through a crisis, you really see what they’re made of. Dr. Rattay is smart, steady, focused, and committed,” said Governor John Carney. Most importantly though, she is kind and compassionate. Her style of leadership and her work ethic are what helped Delaware make it through this pandemic. And the work Dr. Rattay did at Public Health in the decade leading up to the pandemic is why her team was ready and able to step up and manage this crisis. We will miss Dr. Rattay as a member of our team and I am personally grateful to her for all she did to lead us through this once-in-a-generation public health crisis.”

“In her 13 years as our Director of the Division of Public Health, Dr. Karyl Rattay has been driven by a singular focus: How could she and her team improve and protect the health and well-being of the Delawareans they serve,” said Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) Secretary Molly Magarik. “Her values, her work ethic and her passion for this work have never wavered. She believes in meeting communities where they are, listening to stakeholders across the spectrum, and building public health responses that are tailored to the populations we are serving. On behalf of the employees of DHSS and the people of Delaware, I offer my heartfelt gratitude to Dr. Rattay her leadership, her innovative spirit, and her commitment to our state.”

Dr. Rattay says leading the state through the COVID-19 pandemic over the last two years – the greatest public health crisis in a century – has tested those in public health departments professionally and personally. She indicated that while she is not ready to announce her next role, she is excited about the new opportunities in front of her and believes this is a good time to transition the Division to its next leader.  

During her tenure at DPH Dr. Rattay and her team have:

  • Succeeded in becoming one of the first 16 states in the nation to achieve and maintain full accreditation from the national Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB).
  • Launched the State’s first Health Improvement Plan and multi-year agency strategic plans.
  • Significantly reduced infant mortality rates by nearly 30% from 2015 -2019 through close collaboration with many maternal and child health partners, and a 25% reduction in unintended pregnancies through the Delaware Contraceptives Access Now (Delaware CAN) initiative.
  • Saw a 14% reduction in cancer mortality rates through a comprehensive statewide prevention, screening, and treatment initiative.
  • Worked with the legislature to pass a bill increasing the age to buy tobacco products to 21 and adding e-cigarettes to Delaware’s Clean Indoor Air Act.
  • In conjunction with the University of Delaware and Delaware Community Foundation, spearheaded the creation of the Healthy Communities Delaware (HCD) initiative – a placed-based partnership with communities to address their most important social determinants of health.
  • Played the state’s leading role in responding to multiple health threats, including COVID-19, H1N1, Superstorm Sandy, Ebola, Zika virus, Tuberculosis outbreaks and others.
  • Launched the My Healthy Community data portal in 2019, bringing Delaware public health data down to the ZIP code level, including community characteristics, the environment, chronic disease, and mental health and substance use, air quality, asthma incidence data, public and private drinking water results, and drug overdose and death data. In 2020, when the COVID-19 pandemic began, the Division of Public Health used My Healthy Community to report COVID-19 data, again down to the ZIP code level in many cases. It was one of the most robust COVID-19 data sites in the country.
  • Assumed a leadership role in addressing the state’s opioid crisis.
  • Added the Medical Marijuana Program in 2014 to administer medical marijuana cards for eligible Delawareans and to license and oversee compassion centers in all three counties.
  • Added the Office of Animal Welfare in 2013 based on the recommendations of the General Assembly Animal Welfare Task Force as a way to consolidate and coordinate animal companion programs in Delaware

Dr. Rattay has earned multiple honors and awards. In 2019, she was awarded the prestigious Arthur T. McCormack Award by the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) for her leadership and contributions as a state health official.  She also received the Vision of Peace award from the Delaware Coalition Against Domestic Violence; the Health Professional of the Year award from the National Alliance on Mental Illness; the President’s Award three times from former Medical Society of Delaware presidents; the Medal of Honor Award from atTAcK addiction and was honored by Governor Carney as the longest-serving state health official in the nation.

She has been named as one of “Delaware’s Most Influential” individuals for 2020 and 2021. Dr. Rattay chairs the Healthy Babies Subcommittee for ASTHO and is a Board member of ASTHO and the Public Health Foundation. She is the Chair of Delaware’s Addiction Action Committee, Co-Chair of the Overdose System of Care Committee, and a current member and former president of the Delaware Board of Medical Licensure and Discipline.

Dr. Rattay earned a Medical Doctorate from the Medical University of Ohio in 1992 and a Master of Science in Epidemiology from the University of Maryland in 2001. She completed her Pediatric Residency at Georgetown University and a Preventive Medicine and Public Health Residency training program at the University of Maryland.

Dr. Rattay is board-certified in pediatrics and practiced pediatrics for 14 years. Between September 2001 and June 2004, she served as a senior public health advisor to the U.S. Surgeon General and Assistant Secretary of Health in the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Department of Health and Human Services, where she had a leadership role in the President’s Healthier U.S. Initiative. 

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 Anyone who is deaf, hard of hearing, Deaf-Blind or speech disabled can contact DPH by dialing 711 first using specialized devices (i.e., TTY, TeleBraille, voice devices). The 711 service is free and to learn more about how it works, please visit delawarerelay.com. 

 Delaware Health and Social Services is committed to improving the quality of the lives of Delaware’s citizens by promoting health and well-being, fostering self-sufficiency, and protecting vulnerable populations.


Elsmere Woman Charged With Animal Cruelty

Wilmington (September 2, 2021) — Officers from the Division of Public Health Office of Animal Welfare (OAW) announced the arrest today of an Elsmere woman on charges of animal cruelty.

Marybeth Stankevich, 64, was arraigned in JP Court 11 in New Castle on 106 charges, including:

·  49 misdemeanor counts of animal cruelty, four felony counts of animal cruelty

·  49 counts of failure to inoculate for rabies

·  One count of failure to remove excreta and food waste daily

·  One count of failure to store food and bedding protecting from spoilage and contamination

·  One count of failure to meet drainage and waste disposal requirements

·  One count of failure to maintain water receptacles in a clean manner weekly.

Stankevich was released on her own recognizance and is prohibited from possession of domestic animals pending a court hearing.

On Tuesday, the OAW’s Delaware Animal Services (DAS) enforcement unit responded to a complaint concerning the welfare of animals on the Elsmere property. DAS executed a search warrant to enter the property, where officers discovered 49 cats living in inhumane, deplorable conditions in the home. In addition, four deceased cats were found in the home. Code enforcement has condemned the home.

The cats were transferred into the custody of the Brandywine Valley SPCA, the state’s shelter provider, where they have been receiving care and treatment. Most of the cats are under-socialized, so the Brandywine Valley SPCA is seeking placement as working cats for most of the cats once they receive evaluations and any necessary medical care.

A working cat lives an independent life with basic care provided by the caregiver. Examples of working cat environments include barns, warehouses, greenhouses, churches and studios. Those interested in adopting should visit the Brandywine Valley SPCA’s New Castle Campus.

To report animal cruelty in Delaware, call DAS at 302-255-4646.

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Anyone who is deaf, hard of hearing, Deaf-Blind or speech disabled can contact DPH by dialing 711 first using specialized devices (i.e. TTY, TeleBraille, voice devices).  The 711 service is free and to learn more about how it works, please visit delawarerelay.com.

The Delaware Department of Health and Social Services is committed to improving the quality of the lives of Delaware’s citizens by promoting health and well-being, fostering self-sufficiency, and protecting vulnerable populations. DPH, a division of DHSS, urges Delawareans to make healthier choices with the 5-2-1 Almost None campaign: eat 5 or more fruits and vegetables each day, have no more than 2 hours of recreational screen time each day (includes TV, computer, gaming), get 1 or more hours of physical activity each day, and drink almost no sugary beverages.


Laurel Woman Charged With Animal Cruelty

LAUREL (October 8, 2020) — Officers from the Division of Public Health Office of Animal Welfare (OAW) announced the arrest Wednesday, October 7, 2020, of a Laurel woman for animal cruelty. Leona Long, 75, was arraigned in JP Court 3 in Georgetown on 77 charges, including 35 counts of cruel neglect, 35 counts of failure to obtain dog license, and seven counts for failure to vaccinate for rabies. Long was released on $37,000 unsecured bail and is prohibited from possession of domestic animals, excluding fowl and rabbits, pending a court hearing.

Last week, the OAW’s Delaware Animal Services (DAS) enforcement unit responded to a complaint concerning the welfare of animals on the Laurel property. DAS executed a search warrant to enter the property, where officers discovered 35 hound dogs living in inhumane, filthy conditions in kennels covered in feces and on tethers throughout the owner’s property.

“It was obvious the animals had been neglected for some time, and suffered tremendously as a result,” said Mark Tobin, Chief of DAS. “To see their tails wag despite such a miserable environment is incredible. These dogs now have a fighting chance for a better future.”

The animals were transferred into the custody of the Brandywine Valley SPCA, the state’s contracted shelter provider, where they have been receiving care and treatment for eye infections, foot and ear injuries, and malnourishment. The dogs range in age from 6 months to 9 years, and will be put up for adoption.

To report animal cruelty in Delaware, call DAS at 302-255-4646.

Note: A photo of Leona Long is not available.

A person who is deaf, hard-of-hearing, deaf-blind or speech-disabled can call the DPH phone number above by using TTY services. Dial 7-1-1 or 800-232-5460 to type your conversation to a relay operator, who reads your conversation to a hearing person at DPH. The relay operator types the hearing person’s spoken words back to the TTY user. To learn more about TTY availability in Delaware, visit http://delawarerelay.com.

The Delaware Department of Health and Social Services is committed to improving the quality of the lives of Delaware’s citizens by promoting health and well-being, fostering self-sufficiency, and protecting vulnerable populations. DPH, a division of DHSS, urges Delawareans to make healthier choices with the 5-2-1 Almost None campaign: eat 5 or more fruits and vegetables each day, have no more than 2 hours of recreational screen time each day (includes TV, computer, gaming), get 1 or more hours of physical activity each day, and drink almost no sugary beverages.


OAW Announces Arrest in Camden Animal Cruelty Case

CAMDEN (Sept. 29, 2020) — Officers from the Division of Public Health (DPH) Office of Animal Welfare (OAW) arrested a Camden-Wyoming woman on Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, in connection to a recent animal cruelty case in which 184 animals were seized from a residence in the Camden area. Linda Favre, 65, was arraigned on 19 charges, including animal cruelty. She was released on her own recognizance pending a court hearing with the condition that she may not own or possess any animals until the case outcome is determined.

The arrest comes after a case of animal cruelty was discovered last week by the Office of Animal Welfare’s Delaware Animal Services (DAS) unit, which enforces statewide animal control and cruelty laws. Acting on a tip, officers responded to investigate. DAS obtained and executed a search warrant to enter the property where animal welfare officers found 182 cats and one dog living in deplorable conditions. One deceased cat was also removed from the residence. Two additional cats have subsequently died.

The animals were taken into custody by Brandywine Valley SPCA (BVSPCA), the state’s contracted shelter provider, where they received clean housing, nourishment, and medical care. Many cats suffered from conditions associated with neglect, such as malnourishment, skin issues from flea infestation, and upper respiratory infections.

This is the largest animal cruelty case OAW has handled since taking over animal cruelty enforcement at the state level in 2016, and it is one of the largest in state history.

“The conditions these animals were subjected to were horrid,” said DAS Chief Mark Tobin. “No animal should live like that, and unfortunately, three cats lost their lives as a result. We are grateful that this was reported so that action could be taken. We feel good knowing the animals are in good hands, and will not suffer any longer.”

According to BVSPCA, one dog and 118 cats have been placed for adoption or transferred to another shelter or rescue organization’s adoption program. Sixty-one cats remain available for adoption across the four BVSPCA campuses.

“If you’re considering adoption, I encourage you to visit a BVSPCA shelter near you,” said OAW Executive Director Christina Motoyoshi. “You can make a huge difference in the life of a cat that was once so neglected.”

The public is reminded to report animal cruelty to Delaware Animal Services at 302-255-4646.

Note: A photo of Linda Favre is not available.

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A person who is deaf, hard-of-hearing, deaf-blind or speech-disabled can call the DPH phone number above by using TTY services. Dial 7-1-1 or 800-232-5460 to type your conversation to a relay operator, who reads your conversation to a hearing person at DPH. The relay operator types the hearing person’s spoken words back to the TTY user. To learn more about TTY availability in Delaware, visit http://delawarerelay.com.

The Delaware Department of Health and Social Services is committed to improving the quality of the lives of Delaware’s citizens by promoting health and well-being, fostering self-sufficiency, and protecting vulnerable populations. DPH, a division of DHSS, urges Delawareans to make healthier choices with the 5-2-1 Almost None campaign: eat 5 or more fruits and vegetables each day, have no more than 2 hours of recreational screen time each day (includes TV, computer, gaming), get 1 or more hours of physical activity each day, and drink almost no sugary beverages.