Delaware Hunting Licenses and Conservation Access Passes Now Easier to Purchase Online

Hunters and trappers can now use a new, user-friendly online system to access license sales, License Exempt Numbers (LEN), harvest registration, hunting permit and hunter education. Made available from the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, the hunting and trapping license and Conservation Access Pass sales system is fully integrated with the hunter and trapper registration system and hunter education records.

Single-sourcing purchases of licenses, permits, and hunter and trapper education materials are the latest update to DNREC’s ePermitting system, which allows customers to establish a user profile to access a variety of licensing and permitting functions. Recreational fishing license sales were made available earlier this year on the ePermitting system.

The online system enhancements include a more modern look and feel using an improved customer interface and a familiar shopping cart approach, with full compatibility for a variety of desktop and mobile devices.

While the ePermitting system offers a new way to purchase, recreational hunting and trapping licenses and Conservation Access Passes can also be purchased and free License Exempt Numbers obtained at license agents statewide. These services also will be available in the future at the licensing office in DNREC’s Richardson and Robbins Building, 89 Kings Highway, Dover, where sales and transactions are currently suspended during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

For additional information and questions regarding Delaware hunting and trapping licenses, Conservation Access Passes, recreational fishing licenses, and other related services, call the Division of Fish and Wildlife recreational licensing program at 302-739-9918 Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. The Division of Fish and Wildlife conserves and manages Delaware’s fish and wildlife and their habitats, and provides fishing, hunting, wildlife viewing and boating access on nearly 65,000 acres of public land. For more information, visit the website and connect with DNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov; Joanna Wilson, Joanna.wilson@delaware.gov

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Delaware Solar Installation Grant Incentive Increased

Delmarva Power Customers Benefit from Green Energy Fund

Solar power installations for Delmarva Power customers in Delaware have become more affordable with grant increases announced this month by the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control.

A program of the DNREC Green Energy Fund, grants for residential solar installations are being increased from $0.50/watt to $0.60/watt, with the maximum grant increased to $5,000. This increase is designed to provide a reasonable incentive for homeowners to optimize the size of rooftop solar for their personal needs.

Grants for commercial solar installations are being set at $0.60/watt up to a maximum grant of $25,000. Commercial grants were previously capped at $3,000 due to limited funding.

The state legislature established the Green Energy Fund in 1999. It is funded by Delmarva Power electric customers, who are then eligible to access the Green Energy Fund for renewable energy projects. Grant amounts are adjusted periodically to respond to changing market conditions.

“Supporting the development of small scale solar has been an essential part of our strategy to promote Delaware’s renewable energy industry and reduce greenhouse gas emissions,” said DNREC Secretary Shawn Garvin.

Since its inception, the Green Energy Fund has supported the installation of 4,764 solar energy systems.

Information on the Green Energy Fund can be found at de.gov/greenenergy or by emailing DNREC_GreenEnergyProgram@delaware.gov.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. The Division of Climate, Coastal and Energy uses science, education, policy development and incentives to address Delaware’s climate, energy and coastal challenges. For more information, visit the website and connect with DNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov, Jim Lee, jamesw.lee@delaware.gov

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New Limits Set for Beaches at Delaware State Parks Starting This Weekend

Two Park Lifeguards Test Positive for COVID-19

In accordance with Gov. Carney’s goal of limiting interactions among people in Delaware’s beach areas to reduce transmission of COVID-19, the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control announced the following restrictions to be imposed starting on Friday, July 3 and lasting until further notice:

  • The number of vehicles allowed in Cape Henlopen, Delaware Seashore and Fenwick Island State Parks will be limited to approximately 60% of the parking capacity. When the 60% capacity is reached, all vehicles will be turned away until vehicle volume within the parks is reduced. Vehicle restrictions may be lifted periodically as volume levels are noticeably reduced within the parks. These limits, which will be enforced at park entrances by DNREC Natural Resources Police, will not be managed based on a “one-in, one-out” policy that would encourage lines of waiting vehicles and people.
  • At Cape Henlopen, when the main gate is closed to additional vehicles based on parking lot capacity, the closure will include vehicles that have arrived at the park for drive-on surf fishing as well.
  • At Delaware Seashore and Fenwick Island surf fishing beaches, NRP officers will monitor the number of vehicles on the beach and will close drive-on beach entrances if vehicles fail to maintain the 20-foot distance between vehicles currently mandated by the Governor’s emergency order.
  • Masks or face coverings are required in bathhouse and concession areas at all three parks and strongly encouraged on the beach as well.
  • Campgrounds and cabin rentals will continue.

“Last weekend, we saw all our ocean parks go to capacity, we saw a number of people not wearing masks in bathhouse and concession areas where they were around others, and we saw groupings of people and activities on our beaches, including in surf fishing areas, that clearly violated the requirements of social distancing,” DNREC Secretary Shawn Garvin said. “This limit on visitors to our beach parks is another measure to try to stop the spread of coronavirus.”

DNREC also reported Tuesday that two of its Delaware State Parks beach lifeguards have tested positive for COVID-19 and are now isolating at home. DNREC is working closely with the Division of Public Health to notify any other employees or individuals who may have had close contact with the affected lifeguards. Our lifeguards perform a crucial role in protecting visitors at our beaches at Delaware State Parks. DNREC continues to follow recommended best practices to minimize health risks to park-goers and our Beach Patrol team, including a strict cleaning protocol for public spaces and sanitizing of staff workstations.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. The Division of Parks and Recreation oversees more than 26,000 acres in 17 state parks and the Brandywine Zoo. For more information, visit the website and connect with DNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Nikki Lavoie, nikki.lavoie@delaware.gov; Shauna McVey, shauna.mcvey@delaware.gov

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Delaware Building Energy Codes Receive Update

An update to the state’s building energy codes that took effect this month will help reduce long-term costs to consumers while also decreasing greenhouse gas emissions in Delaware.

Energy codes establish minimum design and construction requirements for energy efficiency in buildings, including insulation, air leakage limits, lighting and heating and cooling systems. The standards increase building sector energy efficiency, deliver energy cost savings to building owners and occupants, increase occupant comfort and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in Delaware.

The update introduces energy efficiency improvements, including increased residential air sealing requirements, hot water pipe insulation and energy efficient windows and lighting options, as well as more efficient heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system operation resulting from improved duct design and sealing, energy efficient windows and lighting options.

“The adoption of these updated standards is an important step in helping Delawareans reduce their energy costs,” said DNREC Secretary Shawn M. Garvin. “It will also help us toward meeting our goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.”

Governor John Carney has committed to reducing the state’s greenhouse gas emissions by at least 26 percent from 2005 levels by 2025. Electric power generation is among the top three sources of greenhouse gas emissions in Delaware.

Construction costs related to the updated codes will be offset by the energy savings accrued to building occupants and owners, according to analyses from the U.S. Department of Energy, including two Delaware-specific assessments completed by the Pacific Northwest National Lab.

The state first established a minimum statewide code for energy conservation in 1979. The code, which is based on standards set by the International Code Council and the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, was last updated in 2009. Legislation requires DNREC’s Division of Climate, Coastal and Energy to review and update the state’s regulations every three years. The latest code update went through a full regulatory process, including a public hearing in December and acceptance and consideration of public comment on the changes.

The update includes a six-month transition period, during which the Division of Climate, Coastal and Energy will provide targeted training and technical assistance to the construction industry and code enforcement officials. Topics that will be covered by the training will include:

  • An overview of the changes
  • Practical compliance strategies, particularly for the building envelope requirements in the new energy codes
  • Construction and design strategies for air sealing smaller homes
  • Other topics, including hot water pipe insulation and HVAC duct design

The training also will provide an opportunity for DNREC to gather additional feedback and input from participants to determine the need for follow-up training topics.
Visit DNREC’s Building Energy Codes webpage for more information.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. For more information, visit the website and connect with DNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Nikki Lavoie, nikki.lavoie@delaware.gov; or Jim Lee, JamesW.Lee@delaware.gov.

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Delaware surf-fishing permits are sold out after reaching annual cap

Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control announced today it has reached its cap of 17,000 Delaware surf-fishing permits issued for the calendar year. With the cap figure attained, no more surf tag permits will be issued until December.

In 2019, the Delaware’s Parks and Recreation Advisory Council established a 17,000 cap on annual surf-fishing permit sales. The Division of Parks and Recreation implemented a first-come, first-served cap on the number of permits issued as the most equitable way to serve all beach users, and to manage a limited resource, while also protecting against overcrowding of parks beaches. This plan aligns with DNREC’s priority to ensure a safe and enjoyable experience for all visitors to Delaware’s state parks system.

While surf fishing permit sales have ended for 2020, novice surf anglers are encouraged to view the “Surf Fishing at Delaware State Parks” informational video that explains surf-fishing rules and regulations in Delaware, what equipment is needed, how to drive on the beach and what to do if a vehicle gets stuck in the sand. There are no current restrictions for non-vehicle, walk-on fishing for those with a valid Division of Fish and Wildlife fishing license. Walk-on surf anglers should only use pedestrian foot traffic access points to access surf-fishing beaches and should use caution near drive-on access points.

Surf-fishing permits also serve as a Delaware State Parks Annual Pass that provides access to all 17 state parks. Park user fees, including surf-fishing permit fees, provide 65% of the Division of Parks and Recreation’s funding, and are used to operate and maintain the parks.

To learn more about fishing in Delaware State Parks, visit destateparks.com/Adventures/Fishing.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. For more information, visit the website and connect with DNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Shauna McVey, shauna.mcvey@delaware.gov, Michael Globetti, michael.globetti@delaware.gov

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