Delaware Schools Closed through Academic Year

A statement from Governor Carney on Delaware Schools:

“We made the difficult decision today – in consultation with superintendents across our state – to close schools through the rest of the academic year. I know this will be difficult for a lot of Delawareans, and Delaware students. Nothing replaces in-person instruction, and the services that are delivered in our schools every day, but the health and safety of Delawareans is our first priority.

“I am confident that school leaders and educators across our state will continue to lean into remote instruction for the rest of this academic year. Our schools also have done a tremendous job delivering meals to students in their communities. That work will also continue. I want to thank all of our educators, students, school leaders and families for their work during this difficult time.”


Governor Carney Directs Two-Week Closure of Delaware Public Schools

State to close schools March 16 through 27 to prepare for potential spread of coronavirus (COVID-19)

WILMINGTON, Del. – Governor John Carney on Friday directed all Delaware public schools close from March 16-27, to allow schools to prepare for potential spread of coronavirus (COVID-19). The following is an excerpt from a letter Governor Carney sent to superintendents and charter school leaders on Friday:

Over the next two weeks, the State of Delaware will work with school leaders and public health experts to create a plan for Delaware students and educators as this coronavirus outbreak continues. We will specifically prepare for the potential impact of extended school closures on Delaware children and their families. Public school leaders should also undertake a deep cleaning of their facilities during the two-week closure. 

Delaware children deserve a world-class education, and ongoing access to services that are delivered in our schools each day. Many students – especially those from disadvantaged communities – also rely on school meals for nutrition, and other important social services. We will be working with districts to plan for providing learning opportunities and other meal and social services for our students in the event of an extended closure.

Read the full letter here.

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17 schools honored for students’ academic achievement

Secretary of Education Susan Bunting recognized 17 schools from across the state for their students’ academic achievement today.

 

The students showed exceptional performance on state tests or made remarkable progress in closing the achievement gaps between student groups, including those from low-income families, racial minority groups and students with disabilities.

 

Each building named a 2019 Recognition School will receive an $8,000 award. Funding for the awards comes from the state’s school improvement funds. Two buildings were named a School of Continued Excellence because they earned Recognition School honors last year and had outstanding performance again this year. Those schools are not eligible for a financial award again until 2020. Two buildings also will be recognized as National ESEA Distinguished Schools.

 

The Recognition School awards were created by legislation passed by the Delaware General Assembly in 2009.

Representatives from all of the honored schools gathered at Capital School District’s North Dover Elementary School this afternoon for the award ceremony. A description of each principal’s reflections on his or her school’s success is attached. Find photos here.

 

2019 winners:

  • Beacon Middle School, Cape Henlopen School District, Recognition School

o   Dave Frederick, principal

  • Christiana High School and Middle School Honors Academy, Christina School District, National ESEA Distinguished and Recognition School

o   Eunique Lawrence, principal

  • John M. Clayton Elementary School, Indian River School District, Recognition School

o   Allisa Booth, principal

  • Frederick Douglass Elementary School, Seaford School District, Recognition School

o   Carol Leveillee, principal

  • Forest Oak Elementary School, Red Clay School District, Recognition School

o   Erin NeCastro, principal and Shane Rifenburg, acting principal

  • Allen Frear Elementary School, Caesar Rodney School District, Recognition School

o   Julie Lavender, principal and Barbara Miklus, acting principal

  • Georgetown Middle School, Indian River School District, Recognition School

o   David Hudson, principal

  • Love Creek Elementary School, Cape Henlopen School District, Recognition School

o   Lisa Morris, principal

  • R. Elisabeth Maclary Elementary School, Christina School District, Recognition School

o   Bartley Dryden, principal

  • Joseph M. McVey Elementary School, Christina School District, Recognition School

o   David Wilkie, principal

  • Milton Elementary School, Cape Henlopen School District, Recognition School

o   Beth Conaway, principal

  • North Dover Elementary School, Capital School District, Recognition School

o   Shani Benson, principal

  • Rehoboth Elementary School, Cape Henlopen School District, National ESEA Distinguished and Recognition School

o   Amanda Archambault, principal

  • Lulu M. Ross Elementary School, Milford School District, Recognition School

o   Cynthia McKenzie, principal

  • Star Hill Elementary School, Caesar Rodney School District, Recognition School

o   Katie Fitzgerald, principal

  • West Park Place Elementary School, Christina School District, School of Continued Excellence

o   Tracy Novack, principal

  • Etta J. Wilson Elementary School, Christina School District, School of Continued Excellence

o   Natalie Birch, principal


Students invited to participate in 26th annual Junior Solar Sprint model car competition

(Rob Underwood of DNREC’s Division of Climate, Coastal, & Energy, left, watches as students prepare to race their solar cars at the 2018 Delaware Junior Solar Sprint. DNREC photo by Joanna Wilson.)

Registration for schools due by Jan. 10, 2020 deadline

DOVER – Delaware 5th-8th grade students are invited to build and race solar-powered model cars in a statewide challenge of creativity, engineering, and speed in the 2020 Junior Solar Sprint state competition, co-sponsored by DNREC’s Division of Climate, Coastal, & Energy and the Delaware Technology Student Association (TSA).

The event will take place on April 2, 2020 at the Delaware Technical Community College campus in Dover as part of the National Junior Solar Sprint Competition, sponsored by the U.S. Army Educational Outreach Program.

Public, private, and parochial schools, and homeschooled children in grades 5-8 across the state may register up to two teams of two to four students each. Registration is free, and the Division of Climate, Coastal, & Energy will provide each participating school with two starter kits, each including a solar panel, motor, and wheels.

Interested educators should submit a completed registration form by Jan. 10, 2020 by email to JamesW.Lee@delaware.gov or by mail to DNREC State Street Commons, 100 West Water Street, Division of Climate, Coastal, & Energy Suite 5A, Dover, DE 19904.

The registration form and rules and guidelines can be found on the Division of Climate, Coastal, & Energy‘s Junior Solar Sprint webpage, or the Delaware TSA State Conference webpage. Schools are not required to have a TSA chapter in order to participate. Additional questions can be directed via email to JamesW.Lee@delaware.gov or by phone at 302-735-3480.

For those not familiar with the event, a video of last year’s Junior Solar Sprint is posted on DNREC’s YouTube channel at 2018 Solar Sprint.

Contact: Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902


State awards federal grants for new, expanding charter schools

The Delaware Department of Education has awarded funds to five charter schools as part of a $10.4 million federal grant Delaware won in October to strengthen the state’s charter school system.

 

The following sub-grants were awarded based on how the charters plan to:

  • Increase academic achievement for all students in the school as well as educationally disadvantaged students;
  • Collaborate to share best practices with district and charter schools;
  • Engage the families of educationally disadvantaged children on school choice opportunities with a focus on Delaware’s rural and urban areas;
  • Leverage partnerships with local agencies (i.e. social services, behavioral health, mental health, educational support, job placement, before/after care) to enhance school services and ensure sustainability.

 

School Funds Awarded
First State Montessori School $832,363
Las Americas ASPIRA $750,000
Newark Charter School $550,000
Providence Creek Academy $50,000
Sussex Montessori School $800,000
                                        Total Awarded $2,982,363

 

New charter schools interested in opening in Delaware and highly effective existing schools looking to add seats or additional locations were eligible to apply for the grant.

 

Funds from the U.S. Department of Education’s Charter School Program will be distributed over five years to support:

 

  • Sharing best practices between charter schools and other public schools;
  • Evaluating and enhancing the impact of charter schools on student achievement, families and communities;
  • Strengthening the charter school authorization process; and
  • Providing subgrants for the planning, program design and initial implementation of new charter schools and expansion and replication of highly effective existing charter schools.

 

The grant also will help the Delaware Department of Education to improve its charter authorization process by enhancing reporting to include additional measures, providing technical assistance to charter school stakeholders and addressing policy to strengthen authorization practices.

 

Media Contact: Alison May, alison.may@doe.k12.de.us, 302-735-4006