DuPont Nature Center to reopen April 1

Volunteers sought for spring cleanup day March 14

DOVER, Del. – The DuPont Nature Center at Mispillion Harbor Reserve, a DNREC Division of Fish & Wildlife facility located in the heart of Delaware’s Bayshore Region and a popular family and school tour destination, will reopen for the 2020 season Wednesday, April 1. The center will be open in April from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Wednesdays and Saturdays only. The center’s 2020 schedule through September can be found on the Division of Fish & Wildlife website.

Prior to reopening, the DuPont Nature Center will hold a volunteer spring cleanup day from 9 a.m. to noon, Saturday, March 14. Projects include exhibit and tank set-up, planting beach grass, cleaning the center, and trash removal from surrounding grounds. Volunteers under age 18 must have a completed parental consent form, and volunteers under age 16 must be accompanied by an adult. For more information or to sign up to volunteer, contact Lynne Pusey at lynne.pusey@delaware.gov or 302-422-1329.

Located on the edge of Mispillion Harbor at the intersection of the mouths of the Mispillion River and Cedar Creek, the DuPont Nature Center at Mispillion Harbor Reserve offers a variety of interactive exhibits and educational programs. In the spring, the center’s large deck overlooking the harbor offers wildlife watchers an unparalleled view of the spectacle of spawning horseshoe crabs and migrating shorebirds, including federally-listed threatened red knots that depend on horseshoe crab eggs to help fuel their 9,000-mile journey. Indoor saltwater tanks allow a close-up look at a variety of aquatic species, from horseshoe crabs to diamondback terrapins.

The DuPont Nature Center is located at 2992 Lighthouse Road, near Slaughter Beach, east of Milford. Admission to the center is free and open to the public. For general information about the center, please call 302-422-1329 or visit the DuPont Nature Center webpage. For inquiries about the center’s programs and operations, please contact Lynne Pusey at lynne.pusey@delaware.gov or 302-422-1329.

About DNREC

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities, and educates Delawareans about the environment. The Division of Fish and Wildlife conserves and manages Delaware’s fish and wildlife and their habitats, and provides fishing, hunting, wildlife viewing and boating access on nearly 65,000 acres of public land. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media contact: Joanna Wilson, Joanna.wilson@delaware.gov

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Skin Cancer Prevention for Warm Weather

SKIN CANCER PREVENTION PROGRAM RETURNS FOR WARM WEATHER: #ProtectYourSkinDE.com

 

DOVER The spring and summer sun is back, and so is #ProtectYourSkinDE, a skin cancer prevention campaign from the Division of Public Health (DPH).  Digital, outdoor, and social media efforts will send Delawareans to ProtectYourSkinDE.com, where visitors can find a dermatologist, better educate themselves about how to reduce their skin cancer risk, and learn from the experiences of others.  Delaware’s skin cancer incidence rate is significantly higher than the national average.  The state ranked fourth-highest in the U.S. for incidence of melanoma, the most deadly and often underestimated form of skin cancer, in the most recent published report (2006-2010).

Many people don’t think of skin cancer as deadly. So, unlike other kinds of cancer, the mortality rates are climbing – due in part to a lack of sun protection and also because people are not going to the doctor when they see something suspicious on their skin,” said Heather Brown, DPH Cancer Control Program Director. “Screening leads to early detection – the earlier skin cancer is detected, the better the outcome.”

While the campaign takes place in the spring and summer, UV protection is a year-round effort.  Any combination of long-term sun exposure, sunbathing, sunburns or tanning bed use increases the chance of developing skin cancer. Protection from the sun’s UV rays could prevent 90 percent of all skin cancer cases.  And in a state with significant amounts of beachgoers, farmers, and outdoor workers, DPH works to educate Delawareans about sun protection and increase the number of people getting screened. In-person efforts begin on “Don’t Fry Day” (May 22), when health officials will be next to the Rehoboth Bandstand, offering sunscreen, “sun-sensitive” educational items, and informative games and materials.

Since 80 percent of lifetime ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure occurs during childhood, the campaign will include in-person education with Delaware’s youth.  Several Delaware high schools are participating in a signature contest, where students will pledge to wear SPF 15 or higher sunscreen.  Additionally, health officials will visit summer camps across the state for interactive trivia, a drawing activity, and to hand out sunscreen.

The #ProtectYourSkinDE campaign runs throughout the spring and summer. In-person event visits will include:

Wednesday, May 20

10:35 a.m.

Wilmington Blue Rocks game

801 Shipyard Drive, Wilmington, DE 19801

Friday, May 22

Noon to 4:00 p.m. Don’t Fry Day at the Rehoboth Beach Boardwalk

Rehoboth Avenue, Rehoboth Beach, DE 19971

Saturday, June 27 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Fifer Orchards Blueberry Festival

1919 Allabands Mill Road, Camden Wyoming, DE 19934

http://www.fiferorchards.com/event/blueberryfestival

Wednesday, July 15 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Family Fun Night at the Brandywine Zoo

1001 N. Park Drive, Wilmington, DE 19802

Tuesday, July 28

9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Delaware State Fair: Health Fair for Kids

18500 South DuPont Highway, Harrington, DE 19952

 Saturday, Aug. 1

10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Fifer Orchards Peach Festival

1919 Allabands Mill Road, Camden Wyoming, DE 19934

http://www.fiferorchards.com/event/annual-peach-ice-cream-day

Saturday, Aug. 8

Zap Amateur World Championships of Skimboarding

New Orleans Street, Dewey Beach, DE 19971

Thursday, Aug. 13

6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Family Fun Night at the Brandywine Zoo

1001 N. Park Drive, Wilmington, DE 19802

People who are fair-skinned or who have blue or green eyes hold the greatest risk of skin cancer, as well as those exposed to the sun through work and play.  All people must keep a watchful eye out for large or irregularly shaped moles.  Regular self-examinations and visits to a dermatologist are essential.  If the cancer is detected early, it becomes less likely that it will spread to other body parts.

For more information, contact the Delaware Division of Public Health’s Comprehensive Cancer Control Program at 2-1-1 or visit ProtectYourSkinDE.com or HealthyDelaware.org.

 

Delaware Health and Social Services is committed to improving the quality of the lives of Delaware’s citizens by promoting health and well-being, fostering self-sufficiency, and protecting vulnerable populations.  DPH, a division of DHSS, urges Delawareans to make healthier choices with the 5-2-1 Almost None campaign: eat 5 or more fruits and vegetables each day, have no more than 2 hours of recreational screen time each day (includes TV, computer, gaming), get 1 or more hours of physical activity each day, drink almost no sugary beverages

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Rita Landgraf, Secretary
Jill Fredel, Director of Communications
302-255-9047, Cell 302-357-7498
Email: jill.fredel@delaware.gov

Delaware Health and Social ServicesDivision of Public Health


Smart Tips for a Healthy Spring

SMART TIPS FOR A HEALTHY SPRING

DOVER – Spring’s warm temperatures bring new opportunities for outdoor recreation and healthy eating. The Division of Public Health (DPH) reminds you that it’s a great time to dust off the bikes, find the tennis balls, and buy more sunscreen. Spring creates more opportunities to be active, like stepping outside for a walk or visiting the park, and to find a local farmers’ market to buy seasonal, healthy fruits and vegetables.

“Spring is a great time to get more active and eat healthier. Most people feel better after walking, jogging, bicycling, playing tennis, or playing with their kids at the park,” said DPH Director Dr. Karyl Rattay. “Becoming more physically active reduces the chance of developing chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain cancers. Fitness also reduces stress and helps prevent heart attacks and strokes.” Just remember to prevent injuries by wearing protective gear, including bicycle helmets and reflective walking clothes.

The Delaware Division of Public Health (DPH) recommends following the 5-2-1 Almost None formula for healthy behavior: eating at least 5 servings of fruit or vegetables a day, watching no more than two hours of recreational screen time daily, getting 1 hour of physical activity each day, and drinking almost no sugar-sweetened drinks. Remember to opt for water when replacing those sugary beverages. For more information about 5-2-1 Almost None, visit http://dhss.delaware.gov/dhss/dph/dpc/521almostnone.html.

With two-thirds of Delaware adults and children carrying excess weight, more physical activity can help them reach a healthier weight. Try walking for 10 minutes daily, then slowly increase the amount you walk a day. Being physically active does not have to be an intense workout either; physical activity can include dancing, gardening, or playing with your kids. For more fun tips on physical activity, visit www.getupanddosomething.org.

Eat the wonderful and fresh produce that is available. Delaware’s Buy Local Guide, at http://de.gov/buylocal, can connect you with local farm stands, farmers’ markets and other sources of fresh, local foods and products from Delaware family farms. You can also connect to the Delaware Fresh app on your mobile device and find locations near you. To improve your diet, choose low-fat dairy products with reduced saturated and total (trans) fat. (Ideal total cholesterol is less than 200 mg/dl.) Also select low-sodium prepared foods. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends adults aim for no more than 2,300 milligrams of sodium per day.

To reduce the possibility of a heart attack or stroke, adults should maintain these recommended waist sizes: for women, less than 35 inches; for men, less than 40 inches; for Asian men, 35 inches; and for Asian women, 32 inches. Persons with results outside these ranges are considered at risk and should visit their healthcare provider. For heart-healthy recipes and news, visit www.facebook.com/millionheartsdelaware.

This is also the season to do some spring cleaning. Mold and household dusts can trigger asthma attacks. DPH recommends reading cleaning product labels and taking recommended precautions to prevent accidentally poisoning household members. Air fresheners, laundry supplies, dry-cleaned clothes, moth repellents and pesticides, and cosmetics may contain chemicals linked with cancer. Consider using products with natural ingredients. For more tips, visit DPH’s Healthy Homes website, http://dhss.delaware.gov/dhss/dph/hsp/healthyhomes.html.

Delaware Health and Social Services is committed to improving the quality of the lives of Delaware’s citizens by promoting health and well-being, fostering self-sufficiency, and protecting vulnerable populations. DPH, a division of DHSS, urges Delawareans to make healthier choices with the 5-2-1 Almost None campaign: eat 5 or more fruits and vegetables each day, have no more than 2 hours of recreational screen time each day (includes TV, computer, gaming), get 1 or more hours of physical activity each day, drink almost no sugary beverages.

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Rita Landgraf, Secretary
Jill Fredel, Director of Communications
302-255-9047, Cell 302-357-7498
Email: jill.fredel@delaware.gov

Delaware Health and Social ServicesDivision of Public Health


Injury Leading Cause of Child Deaths in Delaware

Help Your Children Have a Safe Spring and Summer

DOVER – Spring and summer months often mean a more active lifestyle for families. The Division of Public Health (DPH) encourages Delawareans to be active and have fun, but also be smart and protect yourself and loved ones from injury. Unintentional injuries—such as those caused by falls, traffic incidents, burns, drowning, and poisoning—are the leading cause of death and injury in Delaware and the U.S. To learn more on how to protect your child from unintentional injuries, visit the Delaware Coalition for Injury Prevention at http://www.dhss.delaware.gov/dhss/dph/ems/injuryprevention.html.

“Lives are changed forever by injuries, many of which could have been prevented or made less serious by using injury prevention measures on a regular basis,” said DPH Division Director Dr. Karyl Rattay. “Things like adult supervision when swimming, biking or playing; always using a car seat or seatbelt; wearing a helmet while biking, roller skating or skateboarding; and avoiding unknown animals, can protect our children. And, keeping children away from fireworks, matches, hot stoves, and chemicals can prevent life-threatening burns and poisonings.”

Delaware Trauma System Registry statistics show that in 2013, 586 Delaware children and adolescents were injured seriously enough to require hospitalization. And, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), every 4 seconds a child is treated for an injury in an emergency department. Injuries due to transportation are the leading cause of injury-related death for children. There are also a substantial number of pedestrian and cycling deaths, and drowning is the leading cause of injury death for children ages 1 to 4. Injuries can occur across all spectrums of everyday life, and in many cases are preventable.

“Preventable injuries are the number one killer of children ages 1 to 19 in the United States. But how many people know that? And how many people believe it would never happen to them?” said Kate Carr, CEO of Safe Kids Worldwide. “The reality is a child dies almost every hour from a preventable injury. Millions more are injured in ways that can affect them for a lifetime. These are more than statistics. They represent real and devastating tragedies for families and communities. Yet we can change this outcome. We can give parents the information and resources they need to create an environment where their children can thrive.”

The good news is that national death rates among children and adolescents declined nearly 30 percent in the last decade, according to the CDC. This is a success story showing that injury prevention programs and policies are making a difference and saving lives. But there is still much work to do in continuing to save the lives of children. As stated by former U.S. Surgeon General Dr. C. Everett Koop, “If a disease were killing our children at the rate unintentional injuries are, the public would be outraged and demand that this killer be stopped.”

DPH encourages everyone to take an active role in injury prevention for the youth of Delaware. The DPH Office of Emergency Medical Services has served as the lead agency for Delaware Safe Kids since 1992. With active coalitions in all three counties, Delaware Safe Kids has been a driving force in raising awareness and education on childhood injury prevention. For more information or to become involved with Delaware Safe Kids, contact the program office at safekids@delaware.gov.

Delaware Health and Social Services is committed to improving the quality of the lives of Delaware’s citizens by promoting health and well-being, fostering self-sufficiency, and protecting vulnerable populations. DPH, a division of DHSS, urges Delawareans to make healthier choices with the 5-2-1 Almost None campaign: eat 5 or more fruits and vegetables each day, have no more than 2 hours of recreational screen time each day (includes TV, computer, gaming), get 1 or more hours of physical activity each day, drink almost no sugary beverages.

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Rita Landgraf, Secretary
Jill Fredel, Director of Communications
302-255-9047, Cell 302-357-7498
Email: jill.fredel@delaware.gov

Delaware Health and Social ServicesDivision of Public Health


Delaware farm stands, markets opening for season

DOVER — With farm stands opening their doors and farmers’ market seasons kicking off this month, it’s now easier than ever for Delawareans to buy their farm-fresh items directly from growers.

“Delaware is looking forward to another great growing season,” said Secretary of Agriculture Ed Kee. “Whether you buy local from a farmers’ market vendor or a roadside stand, you can get the best and freshest produce right here in Delaware.”

Shoppers can easily and quickly find local sources of fresh produce, meat, eggs and other agricultural products by using several new resources:

>> The new Buy Local Guide, at de.gov/buylocal, featuring lists of farmers’ markets, farm stands, creameries, equine operations and more.

>> The revamped Delaware Fresh app for mobile devices, now offering a search function to help users find products faster.

>> A new edition of the printed Delaware Ag Directory, available at locations around the state.

“Finding a farm selling your favorite foods is as easy as clicking, swiping or turning a page,” Kee said. “Getting to know your local farmers also helps create connections between neighbors, and fosters more awareness of agriculture’s important role in Delaware’s economy.”

The farmers’ market season this year features 27 community-run markets, with the Milton Farmers’ Market opening the season on Friday, April 18. The 2013 season set a record, with $2.1 million in sales. Six markets are accepting the Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) card system, allowing families to purchase local produce and food items as part of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

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Contact:
Dan Shortridge
Chief of Community Relations
Delaware Department of Agriculture
302-698-4520