Department of Education seeks Summer Fellows

The Delaware Department of Education is accepting applications for summer fellowships for promising future leaders and current educators who have a passion for education and want to gain hands-on exposure to policy work.

There are two opportunities, one developed specifically for current college students and recent graduates and a second for current Delaware public school teachers and specialists.

Participants in both programs will own tightly-defined projects critical to Delaware’s policy agenda. They also will participate in weekly sessions with Delaware leaders in state government, district and school leadership and community partners.  These sessions are intended to develop them as leaders and provide context on education issues of national importance. The fellowships will culminate in a presentation of their work and policy recommendations to department staff and leadership.

 

Delaware Future Education Leaders Program

The Delaware Future Education Leaders Program has been developed specifically for current students and recent graduates as they explore careers in education and seek exposure to state government.  Individuals from all programs of study are welcome to apply.  Past fellows have worked on a variety of projects including educator compensation reform, data analysis, and information systems design.

The program begins on Monday, June 3 and ends on Thursday, August 8.  There is a $3,000 payment for this fellowship.  Program fellows will work full days Monday-Thursday.

“I am excited to have these outstanding college students and recent graduates join our department for the summer,” Secretary of Education Susan Bunting said. “The department will benefit from the experiences and new ideas they bring to the policy challenges we are grappling with, and I hope they will end the summer having gained a better understanding of education policy and will have benefited from the mentorship of department leaders.”

 

Educators as Catalysts Program

Educators as Catalysts Program has been developed specifically for current Delaware teachers and specialists (of any experience level) who seek exposure to the education policy processes that impact their schools and classrooms. The program begins on Monday, June 17 and ends on Thursday, August 1. There is a $2,000 stipend for this fellowship.  Program fellows will work full days Monday-Thursday.

“The teachers and specialists currently working in our schools bring valuable perspectives to our work. This is an outstanding opportunity for us to work closely with them to help shape policy at the state level that makes the most sense for our students, educators, and community,” Bunting said.

The application deadline for both fellowships is Monday, April 1.

More information, including details on how to apply, is available here.

 

Media Contact: Alison May, alison.may@doe.k12.de.us, 302-735-4006


State seeks sponsors, meal sites for 2019 Summer Food Service Program

A program that targets children in low-income areas so they have meals during the summer is seeking sponsors and meal sites. The Summer Food Service Program (SFSP), a federally funded program operated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and managed locally by the Delaware Department of Education (DDOE), needs sponsors and meal sites for locations throughout Delaware to increase the number of children 18 years of age or younger who receive nutritious and healthy meals during the summer months. Organizations that participate are eligible to receive reimbursements for meals served and administrative expenses.

Who Can Participate?

• Sponsors – Units of local government, camps, schools, and private nonprofit organizations are eligible to operate a SFSP as sponsors.

• Meal sites – Individual sites, such as camps, housing complexes, community centers, parks and homes are eligible to operate a SFSP as a site under a sponsor. The sponsor would prepare and deliver the meals to the site (some locations may be served by a food truck, depending on availability). An adult at the site would be required to be the site supervisor to oversee the meals being served.

• Children – Children 18 and under may receive free meals and snacks through the SFSP.
(Meals and snacks also are available to persons with disabilities, 21 and under, who participate in school programs.)

Sponsors and sites will receive training to help them operate a successful program and will have continued support from the Delaware Department of Education throughout the course of the program. All sponsors and sites must agree to serve meals per the USDA Nondiscrimination Statement.

Eligibility for SFSP is based on free and reduced lunch data for a school for a particular area or census data. To qualify as an open site that can feed all children, the site must be in an area where 50 percent or more of the children qualify for free or reduced lunch. In addition, camps and enrolled programs may qualify based on individual income eligibility. The income scale is available here.

For information on becoming a SFSP sponsor or site or to locate a sponsored site in your area, call (302) 857-3356 or visit: http://www.doe.k12.de.us and search “Summer Food Service Program.”

Media Contact: Alison May, alison.may@doe.k12.de.us, 302-735-4006


DPH Advises Residents to Prepare for Dangerously High Temperatures This Week

DOVER – As many Delawareans head outside for Fourth of July festivities, the Division of Public Health (DPH) encourages Delaware residents to prepare for extreme heat early this week and prevent heat-related illness as temperatures rise. Temperatures are expected to reach the mid-90s through Tuesday, with the heat index values as high as 105 degrees. The National Weather Service has issued an Excessive Heat Warning for New Castle County through 8 p.m., Tuesday, July 3, and a Heat Advisory for Kent County and inland Sussex County through 8 p.m., Monday, July 2.

Our bodies have less chance to recover during hot days and warm nights, placing everyone at risk for heat-related illness. When temperatures and humidity are high, sweat ceases to evaporate and the body’s natural cooling system slows down or shuts down completely. Hot weather can cause heat exhaustion, heat stroke, and severe respiratory conditions, which can be fatal.

Extreme heat is especially dangerous for seniors, young children, people with disabilities, and people with breathing conditions and other chronic medical conditions, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and other respiratory problems. Higher temperatures, not even in the extreme, have also been associated with higher levels of inflammation in patients with preexisting heart health conditions. Also at risk are people without access to air conditioning, fans, or cooling shelters.

DPH suggests that every household make a heat wave plan in case of a power outage. Air conditioners should be serviced and electric fans should be obtained before the heat rises to dangerous levels. Residents should keep cases of bottled water on hand and listen to local news reports for the locations of community “cooling centers,” which are often public libraries or churches. During days of extreme heat, Delawareans should check on vulnerable members of their families and neighbors, including seniors and those with access and functional needs.

For those who may need additional assistance, Delaware 2-1-1 connects Delawareans with critical services and support. Eligible callers can receive referrals to crisis assistance, and nearby cooling centers.

Tips to prevent heat illness:
•  Do not leave anyone alone in a parked car, even for a minute. Call 911 if you see anyone (a child or adult with access and functional needs) who is unable to open a door or window and is left unattended in a vehicle. Keep your car locked when you’re not in it so children don’t get in on their own. When traveling with a young child in your car, create reminders to check your backseat, by putting something next to your child such as a briefcase, a purse or a cell phone that is needed at your final destination. This is especially important if you’re not following your normal routine.

Also remember that any equipment left in a car can quickly become hot to the touch, especially metal pieces in child car seats, seatbelt handles, and wheelchairs. Check the temperature of these items prior to use to avoid potential burns.

Carry water with you and drink continuously even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid drinks containing sugar, alcohol, or caffeine, which dehydrate the body. Check with a doctor before increasing fluid intake if you have epilepsy, heart, kidney, or liver disease, or if you are on a fluid-restrictive diet. Avoid using salt tablets unless directed to do so by a physician. Visit http://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/nutrition/index.html for more information.

Stay indoors on the lowest floor possible. When outdoors, wear lightweight, light-colored clothing. Wear a hat or use an umbrella. Use sunscreen with SPF 30+. Sunburn slows the skin’s ability to cool itself, and has been linked to skin cancer.

Avoid extreme temperature changes. Be careful trying to cool down too quickly; a cold shower immediately after coming in from hot temperatures can lead to hypothermia, particularly for the elderly and children. In these cases, cool water is better than ice cold water.

Limit outdoor activity, especially mid-day when the sun is hottest. Work out or hold team practices early in the morning or in the early evening. A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) online course for coaches, athletic trainers, students, school nurses, parents, and teachers is available at: cdc.gov/nceh/hsb/extreme/Heat_Illness/index.html.

Heed the following heat danger warning signs and take suggested actions:

  • Heat cramps occur in the muscles of the limbs or abdomen during or after physical activity in high heat. Sweating results in a loss of fluids and salts that cause muscle cramps. Address heat cramps by resting in a cool place and drinking plenty of water.
  • Heat exhaustion is more severe, occurring when a person is overheated, along with reduced or unbalanced intake of fluids. Symptoms include dehydration, fatigue, weakness, clammy skin, headache, nausea and/or vomiting, rapid breathing, irritability, and fainting. Take these simple steps to reduce heat exhaustion: Move the person indoors or into shade. Loosen or remove the person’s clothing. Encourage the person with heat exhaustion to eat and drink. Get the person to a cool shower or bath. Call your doctor for further advice.
  •  Heat stroke occurs when the body can no longer cool itself, and can be a life-threatening event. Prompt medical treatment is required. Symptoms include: flushed, hot and dry skin with no sweating; high body temperature (above 103 degrees F, taken orally); severe, throbbing headache; weakness, dizziness, or confusion; sluggishness or fatigue; decreased responsiveness; and loss of consciousness. If heat stroke occurs, take these steps: Call 9-1-1 immediately. This is a medical emergency. Get the heat stroke victim indoors or into shade. Get the person into a cool shower or bath or wipe them down with continuously soaked cool washcloths while awaiting emergency responders.

For more information, visit the CDC at cdc.gov/extremeheat/warning.html.

Make a Heat Plan for Pets:
DPH also urges pet owners to make a plan for caring for their pets. Animals at the greatest risk of stress from the heat include pregnant or lactating animals, very young and older animals, animals with darker coats, obese pets, short-nosed dog breeds, and animals with chronic health conditions. Signs of heat stress can include panting, increased salivation, restlessness, muscle spasms, increased heartbeat and body temperature, weakness, lack of coordination, bright red or pale and sticky gums, vomiting, diarrhea, and depression.

•  Pets should not be left in vehicles, even in mild temperatures: Animals kept inside a vehicle in warm or hot temperatures are susceptible to heatstroke. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), the interior of a vehicle can reach 89 degrees in just 10 minutes when the temperature outside is just 70 degrees. At 80 degrees outside, a vehicle’s interior can reach 99 degrees in that time. Temperatures will continue to rise inside a vehicle, and the AVMA states that cracking windows does little to help. Call 911 immediately if you see a pet left unattended in a vehicle.

•  Animals should have access to shade and water when outside: The best place for pets in hot temperatures is inside the home. If a pet must be outside in the heat, make sure the animal has a shady area and fresh water to help stay cool. The interiors of cat and dog houses can get very hot in summer months and, therefore, do not provide adequate shade.

•  Practice caution when walking dogs in the heat: The best time of day to walk dogs in summer months is in the early morning or late evening when the sun’s heat is not as intense. A simple touch of the hand to any surface where a walk is planned will tell if it’s too hot for a dog. If it’s too hot for a human hand, it’s too hot for a dog’s paws.

•  Pay attention to signs of heat stroke: Just like humans, dogs are susceptible to heat stroke in high temperatures, especially if there is increased activity or little ventilation. A dog that is drooling and panting due to heat can quickly progress to a heat stroke, which can be life-threatening. Immediate veterinary attention is suggested for dogs that have become over-heated.

A person who is deaf, hard-of-hearing, deaf-blind or speech-disabled can call the DPH phone number above by using TTY services. Dial 7-1-1 or 800-232-5460 to type your conversation to a relay operator, who reads your conversation to a hearing person at DPH. The relay operator types the hearing person’s spoken words back to the TTY user. To learn more about TTY availability in Delaware, visit http://delawarerelay.com.

Delaware Health and Social Services is committed to improving the quality of the lives of Delaware’s citizens by promoting health and well-being, fostering self-sufficiency, and protecting vulnerable populations. DPH, a division of DHSS, urges Delawareans to make healthier choices with the 5-2-1 Almost None campaign: eat 5 or more fruits and vegetables each day, have no more than 2 hours of recreational screen time each day (includes TV, computer, gaming), get 1 or more hours of physical activity each day, and drink almost no sugary beverages.


Sponsors and meal sites sought for 2018 Summer Food Service Program

A program that targets children in low-income areas so they have meals during the summer when schools are out of session is seeking sponsors and meal sites.

The Summer Food Service Program, a federally funded program operated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and managed locally by the Delaware Department of Education, needs sponsors and meal sites for locations throughout Delaware to increase the number of children 18 years of age or younger who receive nutritious and healthy meals during the summer months. Organizations that participate are eligible to receive reimbursements for meals served and administrative expenses.

Who Can Participate?

Sponsors – Units of local government, camps, schools, and private nonprofit organizations are eligible to operate as sponsors.

Meal sites – Individual sites, such as camps, housing complexes, community centers, parks and homes are eligible to operate as a site under a sponsor. The sponsor would prepare and deliver the meals to the site (some locations may be served by a food truck, depending on availability). An adult at the site would be required to be the site supervisor to oversee the meals being served.

Children – Children 18 and under may receive free meals and snacks. Meals and snacks also are available to persons with disabilities, over age 18, who participate in school programs.

Sponsors and sites will receive training to help them operate a successful program and will have continued support from the Delaware Department of Education throughout the course of the program. All sponsors and sites must agree to serve meals per the USDA nondiscrimination statement.

Eligibility is based on free and reduced lunch data for a school for a particular area. To qualify as an open site that can feed all children, the site must be in an area where 50 percent or more of the children qualify for free or reduced lunch. In addition, camps and enrolled programs may qualify based on individual income eligibility.

For information on becoming a sponsor or site, or to locate a sponsored site in your area, call (302) 857-3356 or visit: http://www.doe.k12.de.us and search “Summer Food Service Program.”

The income scale is attached.

 

 

 

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at: http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

(1) mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
1400 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;

(2) fax: (202) 690-7442; or

(3) email: program.intake@usda.gov.

 

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

 

Media Contact: Alison May, alison.may@doe.k12.de.us, (302) 735-4006

 

 


Summer Food Service Program Provides Nutritious Meals for Needy Children

Delaware’s First Lady is leading effort to ensure children have regular access to healthy meals

WILMINGTON, Del. – First Lady Tracey Quillen Carney and the Delaware Department of Education are asking for your help in letting Delaware residents know of the availability of free meals this summer for children in need.

The Summer Food Service Program targets children in low-income areas to ensure they have nutritious meals during the summer. Children and teens 18 years old or younger are eligible to receive a meal at the open sites. It is a federally funded program operated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and managed locally by the Delaware Department of Education.

Delawareans can call “211” or text “food” or “comida” to 877-877 to find meal sites in Delaware.

“We’re asking all Delawareans to join in the fight against childhood hunger by spreading the word about the Summer Food Service Program,” said First Lady Tracey Quillen Carney. “Ensuring that every child has access to nutritious meals is a moral obligation that also supports the most urgent, practical goals we have for our state – for student engagement and achievement, for public health, and for a vibrant economy driven by a strong workforce.”

Meal site sponsors, including school districts, are using creative ways to reach children in their communities, including trucks that bring meals to neighborhoods, partnerships with libraries and bookmobiles and meal sites at community functions such as the Loockerman Way Farmers’ Market in Dover and the Delaware State Fair.

“Many children depend on the nutrition they receive at school during the academic year. When school is out, their needs remain,” said Susan Bunting, Secretary of the Delaware Department of Education. “The Summer Food Service Program provides meals to children in their own communities so that they don’t go hungry during summer break.”

First Lady Carney is leading a Delaware team studying how to leverage public-private partnerships to ensure school-age children have regular access to healthy meals. In addition to providing more education and outreach to increase awareness, the team will identify new and innovative ways to increase access to child nutrition programs, specifically for families in rural areas when school is not in session.

Use the hashtag #summermealsDE to spread the word on social media.

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Related news:
First Lady Tracey Quillen Carney Attends Learning Lab on Strategies to Reduce Childhood Hunger