Whipping Post to be Removed from Public Display

GEORGETOWN, Del. – Tomorrow, July 1, the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs will remove a whipping post from public display on the grounds of the Old Sussex County Courthouse near the Circle in Georgetown.

Whipping post formerly displayed in Georgetown, Sussex County

The decision to remove the whipping post was made in response to calls from the community and in recognition of the violence and racial discrimination that its display signified to many Delawareans.

“Finally, Delaware is removing its last ‘Red Hannah,’ the whipping post, from the public’s view,” said Dr. Reba Hollingsworth, vice-chair of the Delaware Heritage Commission. “Such relics of the past should be placed in museums to be preserved and protected for those who want to remember the cruel, inhuman, barbarous acts perpetrated on our citizens.”

The post will be moved to a Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs (HCA) storage facility with other historical objects and artifacts, including a whipping post that once stood near The Green in Dover.

“It is appropriate for an item like this to be preserved in the state’s collections, so that future generations may view it and attempt to understand the full context of its historical significance,” said HCA Director Tim Slavin. “It’s quite another thing to allow a whipping post to remain in place along a busy public street – a cold, deadpan display that does not adequately account for the traumatic legacy it represents, and that still reverberates among communities of color in our state.”

HCA intends to work with historians, educators and leaders of the African American community in Delaware to explore plans for future display of this artifact in a museum setting, where it can be properly contextualized and interpreted.

This whipping post was located on the grounds of the Sussex Correctional Institution south of Georgetown. The facility was established in 1931, but the exact date this particular post was installed is not known. In 1992, the warden donated the post to HCA. The post was installed for public display at the state-owned Old Sussex County Courthouse site in September of 1993.

The history of corporal punishment in Delaware goes back to the earliest days of colonial settlement and included the use of the whipping post and the pillory in all three counties into the 20th century. These punishments were imposed for a variety of crimes throughout history and were disproportionately applied to persons of color. Those sentenced to the whipping post could be lashed up to 40 times for a single offense.

Dr. Hollingsworth, a lifelong Delaware educator, historian and civil rights advocate, witnessed a whipping in her childhood that still lives in her memory:

When I was a child in the late 1930s, I saw a man being whipped at the Kent County jail at the corner of New and Water Streets in Dover. On a Saturday morning, my dad, Solomon Ross, had driven to Dover from Milford to conduct some business. When he saw the crowd gathered at the front of the jail, he parked his car and he, my sister Vivienne and I joined the crowd around the wire mesh fence, which surrounded the jail yard.

There, we saw a man, naked to his waist, with his wrists shackled to an eight-foot post, being whipped by a man with a cat-o-nine-tails that had a short handle with nine rawhide thongs, which appeared to be about 18 inches long.

Even though the whipping occurred more than 80 years ago, I still remember the eerie silence that was pierced by the lashes of the whip. After each lash, the warden would loudly count each lash.

I don’t remember how many lashes the man received that day, but the incident is a vivid memory every time I pass the jail on New Street, even though Red Hannah has been removed. When I drive around the Circle in Georgetown, my childhood emotions fill my heart.

The last use of the whipping post in Delaware took place in 1952. Delaware was the last state to abolish the whipping post, removing the penalty from state law in 1972 through an act of the General Assembly signed by Gov. Russell Peterson.


Delaware Public Health announces 170 new positive cases, 9 more deaths related to COVID-19

SMYRNA (May 3, 2020) – The Delaware Division of Public Health (DPH) is announcing nine additional fatalities related to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is providing an update on the number of positive cases and recovered individuals. All data reported through the daily updates are based on data received as of 6 p.m. the previous day.

In total,177 Delawareans have passed away due to complications from COVID-19. Individuals who have died from COVID-19 ranged in age from 26 to 103 years old. Of those who have died, 94 were females and 83 were males. A total of 79 individuals were from New Castle County, 30 were from Kent County, and 68 were from Sussex County.

DPH will provide demographic information for COVID-19-related deaths in aggregate only, and will no longer provide demographics of each individual person who died.

The most recent deaths announced today ranged in age from 33 to 84. Four were female and five were male. Three were New Castle County residents, one was a Kent County resident, and five were Sussex County residents. All nine individuals had underlying health conditions. Five individuals were residents of long-term care facilities.

To protect personal health information, DPH will not confirm specific information about any individual case, even if other persons or entities disclose it independently.

The latest Delaware COVID-19 case statistics* cumulatively since March 11, provided as of 6 p.m., Saturday, May 2, include:

  • 5,208 total laboratory-confirmed cases
  • New Castle County cases: 1,903
  • Kent County cases: 821
  • Sussex County cases: 2,461
  • Unknown County: 23
  • Females: 2,810; Males: 2,375; Unknown: 23
  • Age range: 0 to 103
  • Currently hospitalized: 284; Critically ill: 61 (This data represents individuals currently hospitalized in a Delaware hospital regardless of residence, and is not cumulative.)
  • Delawareans recovered: 1,640
  • 18,529 negative cases**
    *Data are provisional and subject to change.
    **Data on negative cases are preliminary, based on negative results reported to DPH by state and commercial laboratories performing analysis.

Additional demographic data on COVID-19 cases and deaths, including race/ethnicity, more age-specific data and rates information by ZIP code, can be found on the Division of Public Health’s My Healthy Community data portal. The data on My Healthy Community will supplement, not replace, the daily case data displayed on de.gov/coronavirus.

Expanded community testing is occurring in Sussex County. Sites can be found: https://coronavirus.delaware.gov/testing/. These sites do not require a physician’s order. These community testing sites are for community members and employees along the Route 113 corridor in Sussex County, including areas as far west as Seaford/Laurel with a focus on employees of essential businesses, at-risk populations and their families, those exposed to someone with COVID-19, or someone caring for a sick family member with COVID-19. The hours of operation for these sites may be limited by the number of supplies available for the specific event.

Delaware is considering patients fully recovered seven days after the resolution of their symptoms. Three days after symptoms resolve, patients are no longer required to self-isolate at home; however, they must continue to practice strict social distancing for the remaining four days before returning to their normal daily routine.

If you are sick with any of the following symptoms, stay home: fever, cough, shortness of breath, sore throat, muscle fatigue, chills, shaking with chills, loss of smell or taste. Other symptoms such as headache or digestive symptoms (vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain or lack of appetite) have been identified as potential symptoms related to COVID-19 and may prompt further screening, action or investigation. If you are sick and need essential supplies, ask someone else to go to the grocery store or the pharmacy to get what you need.

If you think you have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, or have symptoms of illness, make sure to distance yourself from others, particularly vulnerable populations. Older adults and people of any age with serious underlying medical conditions – including serious heart conditions, chronic lung conditions, including moderate to severe asthma, severe obesity and those who are immunocompromised, including through cancer treatment – might be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

Statewide testing at standing health facility testing sites require a physician’s order or prescription to be tested (*Bayhealth patients will be pre-screened via phone without needing to see a provider first). These are not walk-in testing sites. Those without a primary care provider can call the DPH Call Center Line at 1-866-408-1899. In New Castle County, individuals can call ChristianaCare at 1-302-733-1000 and Sussex County residents who do not have a provider can call the Beebe COVID-19 Screening Line at 302-645-3200. Individuals awaiting test results should wait to hear back from their medical provider. The DPH Call Center does not have test results.

Anyone with a question about COVID-19, whether related to medical or social service needs, should call Delaware 2-1-1; or 7-1-1 for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing, or text your ZIP code to 898-211. Hours of operation are 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

In addition, the Division of Public Health asks any Delaware health care, long-term care, residential, or other high-risk facility with questions or concerns to email: DPH_PAC@delaware.gov or call the DPH Call Center at 1-866-408-1899 and press ext. 2.

Questions can also be submitted by email at DPHCall@delaware.gov.

DPH will continue to update the public as more information becomes available. For the latest on Delaware’s response, go to de.gov/coronavirus.


Public Health Announces 184 Additional Positive Cases of Covid-19 in Delaware, 7 more deaths

SMYRNA (May 1, 2020) – The Delaware Division of Public Health (DPH) is announcing seven additional fatalities related to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is providing an update on the number of positive cases and recovered individuals. All data reported through the daily updates are based on data received as of 6 p.m. the previous day.

In total,159 Delawareans have passed away due to complications from COVID-19. Individuals who have died from COVID-19 ranged in age from 30 to 103 years old. Of those who have died, 83 were females and 76 were males. A total of 70 individuals were from New Castle County, 27 were from Kent County, and 62 were from Sussex County.

DPH will provide demographic information for COVID-19-related deaths in aggregate only, and will no longer provide demographics of each individual person who died.

The most recent deaths announced today ranged in age from 30 to 98. Five were female and two were male. Two were New Castle County residents, one was a Kent County resident, and four were Sussex County residents. Six of the most recent deaths involved individuals with underlying health conditions. Five individuals were residents of long-term care facilities. DPH learned that one previously reported death was a resident of a long-term care facility, therefore that individual is now included in the total fatalities related to long-term care.

To protect personal health information, DPH will not confirm specific information about any individual case, even if other persons or entities disclose it independently.

Governor Carney’s thirteenth modification to his State of Emergency declaration, requires Delawareans to wear face coverings in public settings, including in grocery stores, convenience stores, pharmacies, doctor’s offices, and on public transportation. Governor Carney’s order recommends but does not require children aged 12 or younger to wear a face covering. Any child 2-years-old or younger MUST NOT wear a face covering, due to the risk of suffocation.

The latest Delaware COVID-19 case statistics* cumulatively since March 11, provided as of 6 p.m., Thursday, April 30, include:

  • 4,918 total laboratory-confirmed cases
  • New Castle County cases: 1,829
  • Kent County cases: 773
  • Sussex County cases: 2,292
  • Unknown County: 24
  • Females: 2,645; Males: 2,251; Unknown: 22
  • Age range: 0 to 103
  • Currently hospitalized: 281; Critically ill: 58 (This data represents individuals currently hospitalized in a Delaware hospital regardless of residence, and is not cumulative.)
  • Delawareans recovered: 1,403
  • 17,667 negative cases**
    *Data are provisional and subject to change.
    **Data on negative cases are preliminary, based on negative results reported to DPH by state and commercial laboratories performing analysis.

Additional demographic data on COVID-19 cases and deaths, including race/ethnicity, more age-specific data and rates information by ZIP code, can be found on the Division of Public Health’s My Healthy Community data portal. The data on My Healthy Community will supplement, not replace, the daily case data displayed on de.gov/coronavirus.

Delaware is considering patients fully recovered seven days after the resolution of their symptoms. Three days after symptoms resolve, patients are no longer required to self-isolate at home; however, they must continue to practice strict social distancing for the remaining four days before returning to their normal daily routine.

Long-term Care Statistics:

Moving forward, information related to positive cases and deaths among residents at long-term care facilities will be updated weekly on Friday, using information reported as of 6 p.m. Thursday. There have a total of 322 positive COVID-19 cases confirmed cumulatively involving long-term care residents and 102 residents of Delaware long-term care facilities have died from complications related to COVID-19.

The locations and number of deaths related to long-term care facilities are:

  • Atlantic Shores Rehabilitation and Health Center, Millsboro (3)
  • Brackenville Center, Genesis Healthcare, Hockessin (3)
  • Brandywine Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Wilmington (9)
  • Cadia Broadmeadow, Middletown (3)
  • Delaware Psychiatric Center, New Castle (2)
  • Delaware Hospital for the Chronically Ill, Smyrna (4)
  • Governor Bacon Health Center, Delaware City (1)
  • Harbor Healthcare and Rehabilitation, Lewes (3)
  • Harrison House Senior Living, Georgetown (9)
  • Hillside Center, Wilmington (3)
  • Little Sisters of the Poor, Newark (11)
  • Methodist Country House, Wilmington (3)
  • Milford Center, Genesis Healthcare, Milford (27)
  • New Castle Health and Rehabilitation Center, New Castle (6)
  • Parkview Nursing and Rehabilitation, Wilmington (3)
  • Pinnacle Rehabilitation and Health Center, Smyrna (4)
  • Seven other New Castle County long-term care facilities (1 death at each facility)
  • One Sussex County long-term care facility (1 death at the facility)

If you are sick with any of the following symptoms, stay home: fever, cough, shortness of breath, sore throat, muscle fatigue, chills, shaking with chills, loss of smell or taste. Other symptoms such as headache or digestive symptoms (vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain or lack of appetite) have been identified as potential symptoms related to COVID-19 and may prompt further screening, action or investigation. If you are sick and need essential supplies, ask someone else to go to the grocery store or the pharmacy to get what you need.

If you think you have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, or have symptoms of illness, make sure to distance yourself from others, particularly vulnerable populations. Older adults and people of any age with serious underlying medical conditions – including serious heart conditions, chronic lung conditions, including moderate to severe asthma, severe obesity and those who are immunocompromised, including through cancer treatment – might be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

Statewide testing at standing health facility testing sites require a physician’s order or prescription to be tested (*Bayhealth patients will be pre-screened via phone without needing to see a provider first). These are not walk-in testing sites. Those without a primary care provider can call the DPH Call Center Line at 1-866-408-1899. In New Castle County, individuals can call ChristianaCare at 1-302-733-1000 and Sussex County residents who do not have a provider can call the Beebe COVID-19 Screening Line at 302-645-3200. Individuals awaiting test results, should wait to hear back from their medical provider. The DPH Call Center does not have test results.

Additionally, expanded community testing is occurring in Sussex County. These sites do not require a physician’s order. These community testing sites are for community members and employees along the Route 113 corridor in Sussex County, including areas as far west as Seaford/Laurel with a focus on employees of essential businesses, at-risk populations and their families, those exposed to someone with COVID-19, or someone caring for a sick family member with COVID-19. The hours of operation for these sites may be limited by the number of supplies available for the specific event.

Anyone with a question about COVID-19, whether related to medical or social service needs, should call Delaware 2-1-1; or 7-1-1 for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing, or text your ZIP code to 898-211. Hours of operation are 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

In addition, the Division of Public Health asks any Delaware health care, long-term care, residential, or other high-risk facility with questions or concerns to email: DPH_PAC@delaware.gov or call the DPH Call Center at 1-866-408-1899 and press ext. 2.

Questions can also be submitted by email at DPHCall@delaware.gov.

DPH will continue to update the public as more information becomes available. For the latest on Delaware’s response, go to de.gov/coronavirus.


Public Health Announces 80 More Positive Cases of COVID-19, 7 Additional Deaths

SMYRNA (April 29, 2020) – The Delaware Division of Public Health (DPH) is announcing seven additional fatalities related to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is providing an update on the number of positive cases and recovered individuals. All data reported through the daily updates are based on data received as of 6 p.m. the previous day.

In total,144 Delawareans have passed away due to complications from COVID-19. Individuals who have died from COVID-19 ranged in age from 32 to 103 years old. Of those who have died, 71 were females and 73 were males. A total of 65 individuals were from New Castle County, 25 were from Kent County, and 54 were from Sussex County. Eighty-eight of the deaths involved residents from long-term care facilities.

DPH will provide demographic information for COVID-19-related deaths in aggregate only, and will no longer provide demographics of each individual person who died.

The most recent deaths announced today ranged in age from 63 to 87. Two were female and five were males. Two were New Castle County residents, two were Kent County residents, and three were Sussex County residents. Six of the most recent deaths involved individuals with underlying health conditions. Two individuals were residents of long-term care facilities.

To protect personal health information, DPH will not confirm specific information about any individual case, even if other persons or entities disclose it independently.

Governor Carney’s thirteenth modification to his State of Emergency declaration, requires Delawareans to wear face coverings in public settings, including in grocery stores, convenience stores, pharmacies, doctor’s offices, and on public transportation, Governor Carney’s order recommends but does not require children aged 12 or younger to wear a face covering. Any child 2-years-old or younger MUST NOT wear a face covering, due to the risk of suffocation.

The latest Delaware COVID-19 case statistics* cumulatively since March 11, provided as of 6 p.m., Tuesday, April 28, include:

  • 4,655 total laboratory-confirmed cases
  • New Castle County cases: 1,717
  • Kent County cases: 743
  • Sussex County cases: 2,169
  • Unknown County: 26
  • Males: 2,121; Females: 2,496; Unknown: 38
  • Age range: 0 to 103
  • Currently hospitalized: 326; Critically ill: 60 (This data represents individuals currently hospitalized in a Delaware hospital regardless of residence, and is not cumulative.)
  • Delawareans recovered: 1,173
  • 16,883 negative cases**
    *Data are provisional and subject to change.
    **Data on negative cases are preliminary, based on negative results reported to DPH by state and commercial laboratories performing analysis.

Additional demographic data on COVID-19 cases and deaths, including race/ethnicity, more age-specific data and rates information by ZIP code, can be found on the Division of Public Health’s My Healthy Community data portal. The data on My Healthy Community will supplement, not replace, the daily case data displayed on de.gov/coronavirus.

Delaware is considering patients fully recovered seven days after the resolution of their symptoms. Three days after symptoms resolve, patients are no longer required to self-isolate at home; however, they must continue to practice strict social distancing for the remaining four days before returning to their normal daily routine.

If you are sick with any of the following symptoms, stay home: fever, cough, shortness of breath, sore throat, muscle fatigue, chills, shaking with chills, loss of smell or taste. Other symptoms such as headache or digestive symptoms (vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain or lack of appetite) have been identified as potential symptoms related to COVID-19 and may prompt further screening, action or investigation. If you are sick and need essential supplies, ask someone else to go to the grocery store or the pharmacy to get what you need.

If you think you have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, or have symptoms of illness, make sure to distance yourself from others, particularly vulnerable populations. Older adults and people of any age with serious underlying medical conditions – including serious heart conditions, chronic lung conditions, including moderate to severe asthma, severe obesity and those who are immunocompromised, including through cancer treatment – might be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

Statewide testing at standing health facility testing sites require a physician’s order or prescription to be tested (*Bayhealth patients will be pre-screened via phone without needing to see a provider first). These are not walk-in testing sites. Those without a primary care provider can call the DPH Call Center Line at 1-866-408-1899. In New Castle County, individuals can call ChristianaCare at 1-302-733-1000 and Sussex County residents who do not have a provider can call the Beebe COVID-19 Screening Line at 302-645-3200. Individuals awaiting test results, should wait to hear back from their medical provider. The DPH Call Center does not have test results.

Additionally, expanded community testing is occurring in Sussex County. These sites do not require a physician’s order. These community testing sites are for community members and employees along the Route 113 corridor in Sussex County, including areas as far west as Seaford/Laurel with a focus on employees of essential businesses, at-risk populations and their families, those exposed to someone with COVID-19, or someone caring for a sick family member with COVID-19. The hours of operation for these sites may be limited by the number of supplies available for the specific event.

Anyone with a question about COVID-19, whether related to medical or social service needs, should call Delaware 2-1-1; or 7-1-1 for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing, or text your ZIP code to 898-211. Hours of operation are 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

In addition, the Division of Public Health asks any Delaware health care, long-term care, residential, or other high-risk facility with questions or concerns to email: DPH_PAC@delaware.gov or call the DPH Call Center at 1-866-408-1899 and press ext. 2.

Questions can also be submitted by email at DPHCall@delaware.gov.

DPH will continue to update the public as more information becomes available. For the latest on Delaware’s response, go to de.gov/coronavirus.


Sussex County: Coronavirus testing sites announced April 29-May 4, 2020

Looking for coronavirus testing locations in Sussex County? See below for dates, times, and locations starting today, April 29 thru May 4, 2020. 

  • Community Testing Site hosted by Beebe Healthcare in the parking lot between JD Shuckers and the Veteran’s Administration off of Rt. 404 in Georgetown: Wednesday, April 29 from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
  • Community Testing Site hosted by Bayhealth at the DHSS State Services Center in Milford located at 253 NE Front Street: Thursday, April 30 from 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
  • Community Testing Site hosted by Beebe Healthcare in the parking lot between JD Shuckers and the Veteran’s Administration off of Rt. 404 in Georgetown: Friday, May 1 from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
  • Community Testing Site hosted by Bayhealth at the DHSS State Services Center in Milford located at 253 NE Front Street: Saturday, May 2 from 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
  • Community Testing Site hosted by Beebe Healthcare in the parking lot between JD Shuckers and the Veteran’s Administration off of Rt. 404 in Georgetown: Saturday, May 2 from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • Community Testing Site hosted by Bayhealth at the DHSS State Services Center in Milford located at 253 NE Front Street: Monday, May 4 from 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

The focus of community testing sites is employees of essential businesses, family members of at-risk populations, those exposed to someone with COVID-19, or someone caring for a sick family member with COVID-19. The testing sites involve both rapid and nasal swab testing, immediate case investigation for positive cases, connection to a resource coordinator for services like food and housing for those who are positive, and care kits to be given to individuals being tested. Care kits will be given to people who have a high risk of household transmission and do not have the means to purchase the supplies themselves. A doctor’s order or referral is not needed for these sites. 

Each of the health care systems in Sussex County is participating in this community testing effort. There will be bilingual staff on site. Nanticoke Memorial Hospital also anticipates beginning community testing within the week and will provide details for their testing plan once details have been finalized. 

Download the flyer: Coronavirus Testing Sussex County April 28 thru May 4 2020

See the full press release from April 27, 2020 from the Governor’s office.