Christina River Watershed Cleanup Extended to May 15

To encourage northern Delaware volunteers to get outside and clean up, the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control in partnership with the Christina Conservancy has extended the month-long Christina River Watershed Cleanup campaign an extra two weeks through Saturday, May 15. The date coincides with the Wilmington Community Cleanup Day taking place in neighborhoods throughout the city.

The 2021 Christina Cleanup campaign mobilizes volunteers to safely clean up their communities by picking up trash in their own neighborhoods, on beaches and along waterways within northern New Castle County, from Brandywine Hundred south through Glasgow and Bear. No pre-registration is needed for this year’s campaign. Volunteers are asked to clean up debris, like cigarette butts, beverage containers, food wrappers and more, that easily end up in waterways and ultimately in the ocean.

While large groups are discouraged, volunteers will have greater freedom to select when, where, and how often their household participates. They can see locations, document their findings and share photos in the cleanup’s mobile-friendly online volunteer hub at Christina Cleanup Campaign.

Volunteers can also find ideas about how to get involved in the 2021 Christina River Watershed Cleanup on Facebook and Twitter. Volunteers can post photos on facebook.com/ChristinaCleanup for a chance to win a 2021 Delaware State Parks pass. Each photo post counts as an entry. Volunteers can post as often as they like throughout the month.

Important Reminders:

  • Pick up trash near your home along streets, roadways, and in natural areas and open spaces.
  • Know your limitations and be aware of possibly hazardous areas, including along roadways, streambanks, and steep or slippery slopes.
  • Pack a disposable bag and rubber gloves whenever you take a walk or go hiking, to collect and carry out trash you find along the way.
  • Always Recycle Right. Only recycle clean items through curbside recycling or designated drop-off locations. Items with lots of dirt or grit attached or inside should be placed in your household trash.

Avoid These Actions:

  • Don’t enter private property without permission of the landowner.
  • Don’t place yourself in any danger while volunteering for the Christina River Cleanup.
  • Don’t collect any trash that your household waste hauler might not accept. Tires, construction materials, and metal drums may be unacceptable.

For more information, visit Christina River Watershed Cleanup or email ChristinaRiverCleanup@gmail.com.

About DNREC
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Delawareans about the environment. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts: Joanna Wilson, Joanna.wilson@delaware.gov, Nikki Lavoie, nikki.lavoie@delaware.gov

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Online registration now open to volunteers for 32nd annual Delaware Coastal Cleanup sponsored by DNREC

DOVER – Online volunteer registration is now open for the 32nd annual Delaware Coastal Cleanup, to be held from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday, Sept. 14. Sponsored by the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, the cleanup spans the First State’s 97-mile eastern coastline and includes river and ocean shorelines as well as wetland and watershed areas. This year, volunteers will focus on more than 45 sites in New Castle, Kent and Sussex counties for cleanup.

DNREC LogoIndividual volunteers and groups are strongly encouraged to preregister on DNREC’s website at de.gov/coastalcleanup to ensure enough supplies are readied for each site. Preregistration will close Monday, Sept. 2.

Groups of 10 volunteers or more also are asked to contact Delaware Coastal Cleanup Coordinator Joanna Wilson by phone at 302-739-9902, or by emailing joanna.wilson@delaware.gov, or to contact the appropriate zone captain listed on the website for advance site placement.

At last year’s Coastal Cleanup, 1,115 dedicated volunteers from civic organizations, youth groups, businesses and families collected 2.7 tons of trash from 42 sites along Delaware’s shorelines and tributaries. Cleanup volunteers’ more unusual finds included a dishwasher, a message in a bottle from 2007, a knife in a sheath, mattress springs, scissors, charcoal grill, pirate hat, car muffler, beach chair, bushel baskets, street sign, key card, glow stick, ink cartridge, pacifier, pith helmet, car console, golf club handle, metal canopy frame, a troll doll, a Nintendo game controller, and a Rubik’s Cube.

Delaware’s Cleanup is part of the Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup, the world’s largest annual clearing of trash from coastlines, rivers, streams, and lakes by volunteers. Hundreds of thousands of people all over the world help each year to rid the environment of marine debris and collect detailed information on the types and quantities of refuse they find. Information is recorded on data cards and sent to the Center for Marine Conservation, which compiles data for all cleanups to help identify debris sources and focus efforts on eliminating or reducing marine debris. For more information, visit www.oceanconservancy.org.

For more information about the Delaware Coastal Cleanup, please call DNREC Public Affairs at 302-739-9902.

Media Contact: Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902.

Vol. 49, No. 202

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New video series on DNREC YouTube Channel shows how to repurpose common recyclable plastic items for new uses

DOVER – Got any empty plastic jugs, frosting tubs, or candy containers waiting to be recycled? A new series of quick, fun videos on the DNREC YouTube Channel shows you some clever ways to reuse and repurpose these items instead of putting them in your recycling cart.

That big plastic jug? Turn it into a watering can.

A plastic ready-made frosting tub leftover from that birthday cake you made last week? It’s the perfect size to hold pencils and pens on your desk – and it’s easy to customize.

After you finish mints, fruity sours, or candy, those little round containers can hold ear buds, change, pills or vitamins, jewelry, or other small items to keep them from getting lost or tangled in your pocket or purse.

Start with a clean container with labels removed – use some goo-gone or other adhesive remover as needed. Then, with some fine-pointed permanent markers and a little creativity, you’ll have a unique item ready for a new life.

To see how it’s done, check out the video series on the DNREC YouTube Channel, and for directions and more inspiration, visit de.gov/repurpose.

CONTACT: Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902

Vol. 49, No. 113


2018 DNREC’s Delaware Coastal Cleanup drew 1,100-plus volunteers who collected 2.7 tons of trash

DOVER – The DNREC-sponsored 31st annual Delaware Coastal Cleanup held Sept. 22 drew 1,115 volunteers, who collected 2.7 tons of trash and recyclables from 42 sites along more than 68 miles of Delaware’s waterways and coastline stretching from Wilmington to Fenwick Island. For the first time in its history, the cleanup was moved to a rain date, due to Hurricane Florence.

“Each year, Delaware’s Coastal Cleanup helps make a difference for marine life and water quality – and it’s the hundreds of dedicated volunteers, many of whom come back year after year, who make the Cleanup an annual environmental success story,” said DNREC Secretary Shawn M. Garvin. “This year, we would like to extend a special thanks to the volunteers who rearranged their calendars to join us a week later than usual.”

This year, more than 21,547 pieces of food/beverage-related trash were picked up, including 3,509 food wrappers, 2,361 plastic beverage bottles, 1,203 beverage cans, 712 glass bottles and 2,882 paper, plastic and foam cups, plates and take-out containers. In a year when the numbers of most trash items were lower, the count of three plastic items increased: 2,738 straws, up from 1,898; 1,116 plastic lids, up from 993; and 7,026 plastic bottle caps, up from 4,636. Other notable items included 1,946 plastic bags, 32 tires, 235 shotgun shells, 8,885 cigarette butts and cigar tips, and 723 balloons.

Some of the more unusual items found during this year’s cleanup were: a dishwasher, a message in a bottle from 2007, a knife in a sheath, mattress springs, scissors, contact lens case, power cord, charcoal grill, pirate hat, utility knife, car muffler, beach chair, bushel baskets, street sign, key card, glow stick, ink cartridge, pacifier, pith helmet, car console, golf club handle, metal canopy frame, and a wide variety of clothing and shoes including sneakers, flip flops, and jeweled sandals, as well as numerous balls and toys, including a troll doll, an Incredibles action figure, a Nintendo game controller, and a Rubik’s Cube.

Delaware’s next Coastal Cleanup is set for Saturday, Sept. 14, 2019. Registration will be posted on DNREC’s website next July, with groups of 10 or more encouraged to pre-register beginning May 1 by calling 302-739-9902 or emailing Delaware Coastal Cleanup Coordinator Joanna Wilson at Joanna.wilson@delaware.gov.

DNREC organizes Delaware’s Coastal Cleanup with co-sponsors including Edgewell Personal Care/Playtex Manufacturing Inc., which donates gloves; and Waste Management, which hauls trash and recyclables collected by volunteers. Delaware’s event is part of the Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup. The types and quantities of trash collected are recorded on data cards and forwarded to the Center for Marine Conservation, which compiles the information to help identify debris sources and focus efforts on elimination or reduction. For more information, please visit www.oceanconservancy.org.

Media contact: Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, at 302-739-9902

Vol. 48, No. 336


Laurel man arrested by DNREC Environmental Crimes Unit for illegal dumping in Sussex County

Robert A. Young

GEORGETOWN – Following an investigation into a complaint of illegal dumping on Hastings Farm Road in Georgetown, Natural Resources Police Officers with DNREC’s Environmental Crimes Unit arrested a Laurel man Nov. 28 for illegal dumping of refuse.While on patrol, officers observed approximately six bags of household garbage dumped on the side of the roadway.

Robert A. Young Jr., 35, of Laurel, was charged with one count of causing or contributing to the disposal or discharge of solid waste materials. The charge carries a minimum fine of $500.

Young was arraigned at Justice of the Peace Court 3 in Georgetown, where he plead guilty to one count of illegal dumping. He was ordered to pick up the trash and issued a $500 fine.

Residents can report illegal trash dumping to DNREC’s Natural Resources Police Environmental Crimes Unit by calling the 24-hour environmental complaints line at 800-662-8802.

Media contact: Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902.

Vol. 48, No. 327

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