Sussex stream restoration video airs on DNREC YouTube Channel, detailing project from start to finish

LAUREL – A new DNREC YouTube Channel video explores a stream restoration project in Sussex County by following it from initial undertaking at a Laurel resident’s request through DNREC’s engineering design for the project to its recent completion by DNREC’s Division of Watershed Stewardship.

What originated as a response to a drainage problem caused in part by a 90-degree bend in a ditch wending through a residential community evolved over time into a stream restoration that greatly reduced flooding in the area. Restoration work centered on rerouting overflow from heavy rainfall to nearby Records Pond.

Aerial footage and graphics in the new video show how the restoration was engineered by DNREC and carried out by a partnership with the Sussex Conservation District. The project used native plants to create a wetlands buffer and also deployed rip-rap to stymie erosion at the base of trees along the stream. “The idea was to return the ditch to a channel with the overflow and stabilize it with native plants so it wouldn’t wash out any more during high-rain events,” Travis Schirmer, engineering/planning/survey technician, publicly-funded water management projects, Division of Watershed Stewardship, says of the stream restoration.

The video can be found on the DNREC YouTube Channel. For drainage concerns or problems, please call the DNREC Drainage Hotline at 302-855-1955 or email DNREC_Drainage@delaware.gov.

Media Contact: Michael Globetti, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902

Vol. 48, No. 18

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New video series – ‘One Minute Wetlands’ – now available on DNREC’s YouTube Channel

DOVER – The new Delaware Wetlands video series, “One-Minute Wetlands,” premieres this week on DNREC’s YouTube Channel with two new videos: “Free Ranging Marshes” and “Marsh Gas.” The series is produced by DNREC’s Division of Watershed Stewardship, Wetland Monitoring & Assessment Program, in conjunction with DNREC’s Public Affairs Office, and provides an intended grade school audience with a quick look into wetland hot topics and fun facts.

“Free Ranging Marshes” addresses marsh migration, the process of wetlands naturally creeping away from open water as sea levels rise. “Marsh Gas” offers a comical look at the chemical process behind that distinctive sulfur odor emanating from Delaware’s salt marshes – one of the most common questions the Wetland Monitoring & Assessment Program receives.

In addition to the “One Minute Wetlands” series, the DNREC YouTube Channel offers a wide variety of fun, interesting and educational videos, most of which are written and produced in-house by DNREC’s Public Affairs Office.

To view “Free Ranging Marshes,” “Marsh Gas,” and other DNREC YouTube Channel videos, please visit youtube.com/delawarednrec.

For more information about Delaware’s wetlands, visit de.gov/DelawareWetlands.

Vol. 47, No. 265

CONTACT: Joanna Wilson, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902


Latest installment in ‘Wetlands 101’ video series – ‘Freshwater Wetlands’ – now available on DNREC’s YouTube Channel

DOVER – The seventh installment of DNREC’s “Wetlands 101” video series – “Freshwater Wetlands” – is now available for viewing on DNREC’s YouTube Channel. The series is produced by the Wetland Monitoring and Assessment Program within DNREC’s Division of Watershed Stewardship to educate Delawareans about wetlands, while promoting the idea that everyone can make a difference in the continuing challenge of wetland preservation.

In Delaware, freshwater wetlands make up roughly 75 percent of all wetlands, cleaning and replenishing our drinking waters, reducing flooding and providing food and shelter for all sorts of plants and animals. Most freshwater wetlands are forested and come in many different shapes, sizes and types.

The new “Freshwater Wetlands” video addresses just three of these types of freshwater wetlands found in Delaware: Bald cypress swamps, Coastal Plain ponds, and freshwater tidal marshes while distinguishing the difference between freshwater wetlands and their brackish or saltwater cousins. It also emphasizes that not all wetlands look like “wetlands” due to their ever-fluctuating nature where water levels rise and fall throughout the changing seasons.

There are many simple choices Delawareans can make to help preserve the state’s remaining freshwater wetlands and they include avoiding wet areas when building new construction or clearing land for agriculture, planting native plants and removing invasive ones, or leaving a planted buffer between open land and large ditch or waterway. For more information about Delaware’s wetlands, please visit de.gov/delawarewetlands.

In addition to the “Wetlands 101 Series,” the DNREC YouTube Channel offers more than 50 fun, interesting and educational videos, taking viewers from the unique steam car collection at Auburn Heights Preserve to the trails and pathways of Cape Henlopen State Park, and from the Delaware Bayshore to the Chesapeake Bay Watershed and many of the First State’s great outdoors places and spaces in between. Most of these videos are written and produced by DNREC’s Public Affairs Section.

To view “Freshwater Wetlands” and other DNREC YouTube Channel videos, please visit youtube.com/delawarednrec.

Media Contact: Michael Globetti, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902

Vol. 46, No. 430


Latest installment in “Wetlands 101” video series – “Restoring Wetlands: Restoration Stories” – on DNREC’s YouTube Channel

DOVER – The sixth installment of DNREC’s “Wetlands 101” video series – “Restoring Wetlands: Restoration Stories” – premieres this week on DNREC’s YouTube Channel. The series is produced by the Wetland Monitoring and Assessment Program within DNREC’s Division of Watershed Stewardship to educate Delawareans about wetlands, while promoting the idea that everyone can make a difference in the continuing challenge of wetland preservation.

Approximately 80 percent of Delaware’s wetlands are privately owned, and with the elimination of more than half the state’s original wetlands since the 1700’s, options for Delawareans to protect and rejuvenate their lands are vital. Part 1 of the “Restoring Wetlands” feature, titled “Restoring Wetlands: Facing Challenges,” addressed some of the common causes for wetland damage, degradation or loss. The new video highlights solutions for reversing that loss.

Part 2, “Restoring Wetlands: Restoration Stories,” focuses on some of the common problems wetlands are up against, and explores Delaware sites that have gone through the restoration process. The six-minute video features four projects that have increased the land’s ability to provide wildlife habitat, keep Delaware’s waters clean, and prevent property erosion through: a living shoreline in Lewes, two converted ditches in the Kent County communities of Sandtown and Felton, and a vegetated buffer in Dover.

In addition to the “Wetlands 101 Series,” the DNREC YouTube Channel offers more than 50 fun, interesting and educational videos, taking viewers from the unique steam car collection at Auburn Heights Preserve to the trails and pathways of Cape Henlopen State Park, and from the Delaware Bayshore to the Chesapeake Bay Watershed and many of the First State’s great outdoors places and spaces in between. Most of these videos are written and produced by DNREC’s Public Affairs Section.

To view “Restoring Wetlands: Restoration Stories” and other DNREC YouTube Channel videos, please visit http://youtube.com/delawarednrec.

Media Contact: Michael Globetti, DNREC Public Affairs, 302-739-9902

Vol. 46, No. 46


Find Delaware Arts Events with the New “What’s On” App

Delaware What's OnDelawareans can now easily find arts and culture events happening today, soon, and nearby with the new “What’s On” smartphone app.

“What’s On” shows an interactive map of Delaware with pins for arts events. Tapping a pin on the map shows an event’s details, contact information, driving directions, and links to the event’s website. Users can also scroll through lists of upcoming events.

The “What’s On” app was developed by Delaware’s Division of the Arts in association with the Delaware Government Information Center (GIC), a state agency charged with helping to connect citizens to government via the internet. Behind the scenes, the app is powered by data from DelawareScene.com, which has been providing arts event information to the public since 2008.

“We are thrilled with this app as it makes the arts even more accessible in Delaware,” said Paul Weagraff, Director of the Division of the Arts. “‘What’s On’ lets you see what’s happening in the arts from your smartphone. People can easily make plans to attend a performance, museum, film, concert or other arts event on the spur of the moment.”

“Many people are last-minute planners,” said Mike Mahaffie, Acting Director of the Delaware Government Information Center. “People launch apps on their phones to see which movies are playing, find places to eat, and figure out what they’re going to do. As part of the State’s eGovernment initiatives, we’re happy ‘What’s On’ makes local arts events a new option for these people.”

“What’s On” can be downloaded at no cost from the App Store and Google Play (search for Delaware What’s On) or by visiting www.delaware.gov/topics/apps.