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Drug-Related “Criminal Nuisance” Property In Selbyville Closed By Court Order

Delaware State Police | Department of Justice | Department of Justice Press Releases | Date Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018



Rapes, Drugs, Robbery, Witness Intimidation Also Part Of Recent DOJ Cases

A house near Selbyville that had been the site of multiple drug crimes and police calls since 2014 was boarded up as a result of work by the Department of Justice and Delaware State Police to deem it a criminal nuisance property. The property at 37920 Washington Avenue in Selbyville was known in the area as a location for drug purchases and had been the subject of police calls, searches and arrests, including an undercover drug buy and seizure of heroin, crack cocaine, marijuana, suboxone strips, cash and guns, over a three-year period. DOJ attorney Oliver Cleary filed a request with Superior Court in April 2018 that the property be declared a criminal nuisance, and in June 2018 a Superior Court judge granted the request and ordered the three tenants to be evicted. On July 31, DSP troopers and the DOJ Crime Strategies Unit served the final notice on the property and it was boarded up. As part of the court order, the property owner is to ensure no illicit activity occurs on the property and is prohibited from renting the property to anyone with a felony drug dealing conviction. The state’s criminal nuisance abatement act has been used repeatedly by DOJ over the last several years to address residential and businesses properties that have been found to be the location of ongoing criminal activity. DOJ investigator Mark Hawk of the Crime Strategies Unit participated in the investigation and eviction. A photo of the property can be found here.

Deputy Attorney General Jenna Milecki secured a prison sentence for a New Castle man for his February 2018 guilty plea to Attempted Rape Second Degree and Assault Second Degree charges. In April 2017, Joseph Snow, 38, approached a woman at a bus stop in the 800 of North King Street in Wilmington, and tried to force her to perform a sex act on him. When the victim refused, Snow began to choke her and punch her in the face. Good Samaritans were able to stop the attack. A Superior Court judge sentenced Snow, considered a habitual offender due to past convictions on weapons, rioting, and reckless endangering charges, to 32 years in prison, followed by 6 months of either home confinement or work release, then 2 years of probation. DOJ social worker Lisa Rapko and paralegal Jayna Quillen assisted with the prosecution.

A guilty plea to drug and weapons charges could lead to life in prison for a 45-year-old Wilmington man who is a habitual criminal offender. Charles Riley pled guilty in Superior Court to Possession of a Firearm by a Person Prohibited, Drug Dealing Cocaine (Tier 4), and Aggravated Possession of Heroin. In March 2017, members of Operation Safe Streets, Sgt. Matt Rosaio and Probation Officer Dan Collins, conducted an administrative search of Riley, currently on probation from a previous drug conviction, at his home in the 1000 block of Bennett Street. Once in the house, officers found a loaded 9mm semi-automatic handgun, crack cocaine, and heroin. A Superior Court judge will sentence Riley, a habitual offender and barred from having a gun because of previous convictions on drug, robbery, weapons, assault, and burglary charges, to between 17 years and life in prison in September. Deputy Attorneys General Timothy Maguire and Rebecca Song prosecuted the case.

A 21-year-old Newark man received an 11-year prison sentence for his part in the robbery of two University of Delaware students. Deputy Attorney General Jamie McCloskey secured the sentence for Karel Blalock. In July 2017, Blalock and another man robbed the students at gunpoint as they walked along South Chapel Street. Prior to trial, Blalock called one of the victims from prison pretending to be someone from the Department of Justice, saying the victim that he was in danger and should leave town before the trial. Newark PD traced the call back to the prison and determined that Blalock made the call himself. In April 2018, Blalock pled guilty to two counts of Robbery First Degree, and one count each of Act of Witness Intimidation and Violation of Probation. A Superior Court judge sentenced Blalock to 11 years in prison, followed by 6 months of either home confinement or work release, then 2 years of probation.

A 59-year-old Magnolia man received a 10-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to raping a child in his care. Deputy Attorney General Kathleen Dickerson secured the sentence after James Stanley pled guilty to Sexual Abuse by a Person in a Position of Trust or Authority First Degree, Sexual Abuse by a Person in a Position of Trust or Authority Second Degree, Rape Fourth Degree. In February 2018, a family friend witnessed Stanley acting inappropriately with the victim and reported it to her family. The victim disclosed that Stanley had abused her on three occasions, including the incident witnessed by the friend. A Superior Court judge sentenced Stanley to 10 years in prison, followed by 2 years of probation. Lorraine Freese and Sue Balik from the DOJ assisted, as did Detective Will Miller from Delaware State Police Troop 3.

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Drug-Related “Criminal Nuisance” Property In Selbyville Closed By Court Order

Delaware State Police | Department of Justice | Department of Justice Press Releases | Date Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018



Rapes, Drugs, Robbery, Witness Intimidation Also Part Of Recent DOJ Cases

A house near Selbyville that had been the site of multiple drug crimes and police calls since 2014 was boarded up as a result of work by the Department of Justice and Delaware State Police to deem it a criminal nuisance property. The property at 37920 Washington Avenue in Selbyville was known in the area as a location for drug purchases and had been the subject of police calls, searches and arrests, including an undercover drug buy and seizure of heroin, crack cocaine, marijuana, suboxone strips, cash and guns, over a three-year period. DOJ attorney Oliver Cleary filed a request with Superior Court in April 2018 that the property be declared a criminal nuisance, and in June 2018 a Superior Court judge granted the request and ordered the three tenants to be evicted. On July 31, DSP troopers and the DOJ Crime Strategies Unit served the final notice on the property and it was boarded up. As part of the court order, the property owner is to ensure no illicit activity occurs on the property and is prohibited from renting the property to anyone with a felony drug dealing conviction. The state’s criminal nuisance abatement act has been used repeatedly by DOJ over the last several years to address residential and businesses properties that have been found to be the location of ongoing criminal activity. DOJ investigator Mark Hawk of the Crime Strategies Unit participated in the investigation and eviction. A photo of the property can be found here.

Deputy Attorney General Jenna Milecki secured a prison sentence for a New Castle man for his February 2018 guilty plea to Attempted Rape Second Degree and Assault Second Degree charges. In April 2017, Joseph Snow, 38, approached a woman at a bus stop in the 800 of North King Street in Wilmington, and tried to force her to perform a sex act on him. When the victim refused, Snow began to choke her and punch her in the face. Good Samaritans were able to stop the attack. A Superior Court judge sentenced Snow, considered a habitual offender due to past convictions on weapons, rioting, and reckless endangering charges, to 32 years in prison, followed by 6 months of either home confinement or work release, then 2 years of probation. DOJ social worker Lisa Rapko and paralegal Jayna Quillen assisted with the prosecution.

A guilty plea to drug and weapons charges could lead to life in prison for a 45-year-old Wilmington man who is a habitual criminal offender. Charles Riley pled guilty in Superior Court to Possession of a Firearm by a Person Prohibited, Drug Dealing Cocaine (Tier 4), and Aggravated Possession of Heroin. In March 2017, members of Operation Safe Streets, Sgt. Matt Rosaio and Probation Officer Dan Collins, conducted an administrative search of Riley, currently on probation from a previous drug conviction, at his home in the 1000 block of Bennett Street. Once in the house, officers found a loaded 9mm semi-automatic handgun, crack cocaine, and heroin. A Superior Court judge will sentence Riley, a habitual offender and barred from having a gun because of previous convictions on drug, robbery, weapons, assault, and burglary charges, to between 17 years and life in prison in September. Deputy Attorneys General Timothy Maguire and Rebecca Song prosecuted the case.

A 21-year-old Newark man received an 11-year prison sentence for his part in the robbery of two University of Delaware students. Deputy Attorney General Jamie McCloskey secured the sentence for Karel Blalock. In July 2017, Blalock and another man robbed the students at gunpoint as they walked along South Chapel Street. Prior to trial, Blalock called one of the victims from prison pretending to be someone from the Department of Justice, saying the victim that he was in danger and should leave town before the trial. Newark PD traced the call back to the prison and determined that Blalock made the call himself. In April 2018, Blalock pled guilty to two counts of Robbery First Degree, and one count each of Act of Witness Intimidation and Violation of Probation. A Superior Court judge sentenced Blalock to 11 years in prison, followed by 6 months of either home confinement or work release, then 2 years of probation.

A 59-year-old Magnolia man received a 10-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to raping a child in his care. Deputy Attorney General Kathleen Dickerson secured the sentence after James Stanley pled guilty to Sexual Abuse by a Person in a Position of Trust or Authority First Degree, Sexual Abuse by a Person in a Position of Trust or Authority Second Degree, Rape Fourth Degree. In February 2018, a family friend witnessed Stanley acting inappropriately with the victim and reported it to her family. The victim disclosed that Stanley had abused her on three occasions, including the incident witnessed by the friend. A Superior Court judge sentenced Stanley to 10 years in prison, followed by 2 years of probation. Lorraine Freese and Sue Balik from the DOJ assisted, as did Detective Will Miller from Delaware State Police Troop 3.

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Related Topics:  , , , ,