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Attorney General’s Office fights drug nuisances one property at a time – Sussex County drug haven closed in latest enforcement action

Criminal Division | Department of Justice | Department of Justice Press Releases | Date Posted: Friday, July 31, 2009



The Attorney General’s Office announced today that it has secured the closure of a
Sussex County property under Delaware’s Drug Nuisance and Social Vices Abatement Act. At a
temporary abatement hearing on July 29, Superior Court Judge E. Scott Bradley found that the
property, at 8855 Cedar Creek Road, in Lincoln, owned by Lillie Mae Lewis, presented a threat to the
health, safety, and welfare of the community and ordered it to be closed immediately.
“This property is a classic example of why Attorney General Biden’s Nuisance Abatement
Program exists,” stated Lawrence Lewis, State Solicitor. “The owner was repeatedly warned of the
illegal activity and continued to allow it to occur. As a result of this action, the surrounding
community will not have to deal with the dangers associated with drug dealing.”

Within the last eight years more than 60 calls have been made to Delaware State Police
regarding complaints of physical violence, sexual misconduct, gunfire, drug transactions, and sexual
abuse at this property. State Police brought this activity to the attention of the Attorney General’s
Nuisance Abatement Program, which conducted an investigation and sought the property’s closure in
Court.

In addition to ordering the property to be closed, Judge Bradley ruled that any lease associated
with the property is void and that all involved parties are to have no contact with the property until a
permanent abatement hearing takes place at some point in the future.

In August, 2007 Attorney General Biden announced an expanded statewide effort to reduce
crime using Delaware’s newly enhanced Nuisance Abatement Act. Enforcement actions under the
Nuisance Abatement Act can take a variety of forms, including closure of the property. The Delaware
Department of Justice identifies nuisance properties statewide through its own investigations and
cooperation with state and local police agencies, local authorities, civic associations, and residents. The
Department works to abate those nuisances, either by obtaining a court order or through securing the
voluntary cooperation of the owner to clean up the illegal activity.
# # #

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Attorney General’s Office fights drug nuisances one property at a time – Sussex County drug haven closed in latest enforcement action

Criminal Division | Department of Justice | Department of Justice Press Releases | Date Posted: Friday, July 31, 2009



The Attorney General’s Office announced today that it has secured the closure of a
Sussex County property under Delaware’s Drug Nuisance and Social Vices Abatement Act. At a
temporary abatement hearing on July 29, Superior Court Judge E. Scott Bradley found that the
property, at 8855 Cedar Creek Road, in Lincoln, owned by Lillie Mae Lewis, presented a threat to the
health, safety, and welfare of the community and ordered it to be closed immediately.
“This property is a classic example of why Attorney General Biden’s Nuisance Abatement
Program exists,” stated Lawrence Lewis, State Solicitor. “The owner was repeatedly warned of the
illegal activity and continued to allow it to occur. As a result of this action, the surrounding
community will not have to deal with the dangers associated with drug dealing.”

Within the last eight years more than 60 calls have been made to Delaware State Police
regarding complaints of physical violence, sexual misconduct, gunfire, drug transactions, and sexual
abuse at this property. State Police brought this activity to the attention of the Attorney General’s
Nuisance Abatement Program, which conducted an investigation and sought the property’s closure in
Court.

In addition to ordering the property to be closed, Judge Bradley ruled that any lease associated
with the property is void and that all involved parties are to have no contact with the property until a
permanent abatement hearing takes place at some point in the future.

In August, 2007 Attorney General Biden announced an expanded statewide effort to reduce
crime using Delaware’s newly enhanced Nuisance Abatement Act. Enforcement actions under the
Nuisance Abatement Act can take a variety of forms, including closure of the property. The Delaware
Department of Justice identifies nuisance properties statewide through its own investigations and
cooperation with state and local police agencies, local authorities, civic associations, and residents. The
Department works to abate those nuisances, either by obtaining a court order or through securing the
voluntary cooperation of the owner to clean up the illegal activity.
# # #

image_printPrint


Graphic that represents delaware news on a mobile phone

Keep up to date by receiving a daily digest email, around noon, of current news release posts from state agencies on news.delaware.gov.

Here you can subscribe to future news updates.