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Governor, Secretaries Dig into Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative

Department of Agriculture | Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control | Division of Parks and Recreation | Forest Service | Governor John Carney | Kent County | News | Office of the Governor | Urban and Community Forestry | Date Posted: Tuesday, April 12, 2022



 Gov. John Carney joined Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control Secretary Shawn M. Garvin, Department of Agriculture Secretary Michael T. Scuse and volunteers April 11 to plant trees on farmland recently acquired by DNREC’s Division of Parks and Recreation for Killens Pond State Park. Pictured, from left to right, STRIVE program student Richard Bebber, Sen. Dave Lawson, Secretary Scuse, Gov. Carney, Bank of American volunteer Crystal Clough and Secretary Garvin plant a ceremonial white oak tree on the property.

 

In recognition of Earth Month and as part of the Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative, Gov. John Carney joined Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control Secretary Shawn M. Garvin, Department of Agriculture Secretary Michael T. Scuse and volunteers Monday to plant trees on land recently acquired by the DNREC Division of Parks and Recreation in Felton.

In November, Gov. Carney kicked off the Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative (TEDI) with the goal of planting 1 million trees – or one tree for every Delaware resident. DNREC and DDA are adding hundreds of trees to that number through multiple TEDI plantings this spring, with several happening at Delaware State Parks.

Gov. Carney encouraged all Delawareans to join the fight against climate change by planting trees this spring.

“Delaware is not only a coastal state, it is also the country’s lowest-lying state and climate change is a very real threat to our future,” said Gov. Carney. “We need your help to reduce our carbon footprint and accomplish our commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 26% by 2025. One simple yet effective way you can help reach that goal is to plant trees in your yards, public spaces, schools and other places in their communities, the benefits of which will be seen for generations to come.”

Volunteers from Bank of America and Dover High School yesterday planted about 100 trees funded by the initiative on the property, which expands Killens Pond State Park west to Route 13 and protects the main water source that feeds the pond at Killens – the Murderkill River. The Governor and Secretaries planted a ceremonial white oak tree, which is commonly found along the river.

“Trees play a crucial role in combating climate change and this TEDI planting is the perfect way to get new trees in the ground while recognizing volunteerism, the preservation of natural areas and open spaces, and Earth Month, which we celebrate every day at DNREC,” Secretary Garvin said. “I am grateful for the Bank of America staff and Dover High School STRIVE students who volunteered their time today to help expand Delaware’s tree canopy for the benefit of our planet and enjoyment of visitors to Killens Pond State Park.”

“Since its inception, the Delaware Forest Service’s Urban and Community Forestry Grant Program has provided almost $1.85 million in matching tree grants for more than 585 projects in the First State – with more than 16,500 trees planted,” Secretary Scuse said. “This year, thanks to our cooperative partnerships with DNREC and the Governor’s Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative, it is my pleasure to announce we will be providing almost $137,000 to fund 23 community tree projects resulting in the planting of 2,950 trees.”

The 52-acre property, comprised of farmland and natural areas, lies within the riparian buffer of the Murderkill River and was purchased in 2020 through Delaware’s Open Space Program, administered by the Division of Parks and Recreation. The land grows Killens Pond State Park to nearly 1,500 acres and expands recreational opportunities for the park’s visitors.

Downstream and within the riparian buffer is the 540-acre Murderkill River Nature Preserve, which is managed by the Division of Parks and Recreation Office of Nature Preserves and protects essential wetlands.

The trees planted April 11 will further enhance the river’s water quality by expanding its protective buffer and will help Delaware reach its TEDI goal. TEDI is one key strategy of Delaware’s Climate Action Plan, which aims to offset the carbon emissions that are driving the climate change.

The Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative is a partnership between DDA’s Urban and Community Forestry Program, the DNREC Division of Climate, Coastal and Energy and other stakeholders.

Delawareans can add any trees they plant to the online TEDI Tracker, which shows location and other information about trees planted around the state since 2020. The web page, de.gov/tedi, also provides information on TEDI tree planting volunteer opportunities.

About DNREC

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Enjoy the natural diversity of Delaware’s 17 state parks. Delawareans about the environment. The DNREC Division of Parks and Recreation oversees more than 26,000 acres in 17 state parks and the Brandywine Zoo. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts:

DDA: John Petersen, John.Petersen@delaware.gov or Stacey Hofmann, stacey.hofmann@delaware.gov

DNREC: Shauna McVey, shauna.mcvey@delaware.gov or JamesW.Lee@delaware.gov

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Governor, Secretaries Dig into Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative

Department of Agriculture | Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control | Division of Parks and Recreation | Forest Service | Governor John Carney | Kent County | News | Office of the Governor | Urban and Community Forestry | Date Posted: Tuesday, April 12, 2022



 Gov. John Carney joined Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control Secretary Shawn M. Garvin, Department of Agriculture Secretary Michael T. Scuse and volunteers April 11 to plant trees on farmland recently acquired by DNREC’s Division of Parks and Recreation for Killens Pond State Park. Pictured, from left to right, STRIVE program student Richard Bebber, Sen. Dave Lawson, Secretary Scuse, Gov. Carney, Bank of American volunteer Crystal Clough and Secretary Garvin plant a ceremonial white oak tree on the property.

 

In recognition of Earth Month and as part of the Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative, Gov. John Carney joined Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control Secretary Shawn M. Garvin, Department of Agriculture Secretary Michael T. Scuse and volunteers Monday to plant trees on land recently acquired by the DNREC Division of Parks and Recreation in Felton.

In November, Gov. Carney kicked off the Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative (TEDI) with the goal of planting 1 million trees – or one tree for every Delaware resident. DNREC and DDA are adding hundreds of trees to that number through multiple TEDI plantings this spring, with several happening at Delaware State Parks.

Gov. Carney encouraged all Delawareans to join the fight against climate change by planting trees this spring.

“Delaware is not only a coastal state, it is also the country’s lowest-lying state and climate change is a very real threat to our future,” said Gov. Carney. “We need your help to reduce our carbon footprint and accomplish our commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 26% by 2025. One simple yet effective way you can help reach that goal is to plant trees in your yards, public spaces, schools and other places in their communities, the benefits of which will be seen for generations to come.”

Volunteers from Bank of America and Dover High School yesterday planted about 100 trees funded by the initiative on the property, which expands Killens Pond State Park west to Route 13 and protects the main water source that feeds the pond at Killens – the Murderkill River. The Governor and Secretaries planted a ceremonial white oak tree, which is commonly found along the river.

“Trees play a crucial role in combating climate change and this TEDI planting is the perfect way to get new trees in the ground while recognizing volunteerism, the preservation of natural areas and open spaces, and Earth Month, which we celebrate every day at DNREC,” Secretary Garvin said. “I am grateful for the Bank of America staff and Dover High School STRIVE students who volunteered their time today to help expand Delaware’s tree canopy for the benefit of our planet and enjoyment of visitors to Killens Pond State Park.”

“Since its inception, the Delaware Forest Service’s Urban and Community Forestry Grant Program has provided almost $1.85 million in matching tree grants for more than 585 projects in the First State – with more than 16,500 trees planted,” Secretary Scuse said. “This year, thanks to our cooperative partnerships with DNREC and the Governor’s Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative, it is my pleasure to announce we will be providing almost $137,000 to fund 23 community tree projects resulting in the planting of 2,950 trees.”

The 52-acre property, comprised of farmland and natural areas, lies within the riparian buffer of the Murderkill River and was purchased in 2020 through Delaware’s Open Space Program, administered by the Division of Parks and Recreation. The land grows Killens Pond State Park to nearly 1,500 acres and expands recreational opportunities for the park’s visitors.

Downstream and within the riparian buffer is the 540-acre Murderkill River Nature Preserve, which is managed by the Division of Parks and Recreation Office of Nature Preserves and protects essential wetlands.

The trees planted April 11 will further enhance the river’s water quality by expanding its protective buffer and will help Delaware reach its TEDI goal. TEDI is one key strategy of Delaware’s Climate Action Plan, which aims to offset the carbon emissions that are driving the climate change.

The Tree for Every Delawarean Initiative is a partnership between DDA’s Urban and Community Forestry Program, the DNREC Division of Climate, Coastal and Energy and other stakeholders.

Delawareans can add any trees they plant to the online TEDI Tracker, which shows location and other information about trees planted around the state since 2020. The web page, de.gov/tedi, also provides information on TEDI tree planting volunteer opportunities.

About DNREC

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control protects and manages the state’s natural resources, protects public health, provides outdoor recreational opportunities and educates Enjoy the natural diversity of Delaware’s 17 state parks. Delawareans about the environment. The DNREC Division of Parks and Recreation oversees more than 26,000 acres in 17 state parks and the Brandywine Zoo. For more information, visit the website and connect with @DelawareDNREC on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Media Contacts:

DDA: John Petersen, John.Petersen@delaware.gov or Stacey Hofmann, stacey.hofmann@delaware.gov

DNREC: Shauna McVey, shauna.mcvey@delaware.gov or JamesW.Lee@delaware.gov

###

image_printPrint

Related Topics:  , , , , , , , ,


Graphic that represents delaware news on a mobile phone

Keep up to date by receiving a daily digest email, around noon, of current news release posts from state agencies on news.delaware.gov.

Here you can subscribe to future news updates.