Delaware News


Jennings, DSP Announce Trooper Plea In Computer System Misuse Case

Department of Justice | Department of Justice Press Releases | News | Date Posted: Friday, August 19, 2022



A Delaware State Trooper has pleaded guilty to Misuse of Computer System Information, Attorney General Kathy Jennings and Col. Melissa Zebley announced Friday.  The case was prosecuted by the Department of Justice’s Division of Civil Rights & Public Trust after Delaware State Police supervisors discovered and reported Boyda’s conduct.

James D. Boyda, a five-year veteran of the Delaware State Police, illegally disclosed protected information from NLETS, a criminal justice computer system that allows police access to New Jersey DMV records, after being misled by an associate.

Dennis Terry, an acquaintance of Boyda’s and a New Jersey resident, contacted Boyda in early March describing a vehicle that he was “having problems” with and asking Boyda to run the vehicle’s plates. Boyda responded that he would look into it. In actuality, and unbeknownst to Boyda, the vehicle was not harassing Terry but was parked in his ex-girlfriend’s driveway. Following a second request, Boyda provided Terry with the results of an NLETS inquiry, including the vehicle owner’s name and address. Terry subsequently used this information to harass his ex-girlfriend, who secured a restraining order against him; Terry currently faces criminal charges in New Jersey.

“It’s unsettling to think how easily this situation could have become worse,” said Attorney General Jennings. “I am not without empathy for the Defendant, whom the investigation made clear was misled by someone he believed to be his friend; but his lack of malice does not change the fact that his actions enabled the harassment of an innocent woman. Law enforcement and other criminal justice personnel undergo extensive training, including confidentiality requirements, before they are authorized to use systems like NLETS; this case should be a reminder why.”

“The Delaware State Police values our relationship with the public and as demonstrated in this case, has supervision, policies, and procedures in place to ensure the accountability of our members. We will continue to provide professional, competent, and compassionate law enforcement services to our communities,” said Delaware State Police Superintendent Colonel Melissa Zebley.

Boyda’s plea agreement commits him to an immediate six-month probation period in lieu of a suspended 12-month prison sentence, in addition to suspension of access to criminal justice data. His probation is dischargeable following completion of all requisite security and acceptable use trainings and appropriate re-certification on law enforcement computer systems.

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Jennings, DSP Announce Trooper Plea In Computer System Misuse Case

Department of Justice | Department of Justice Press Releases | News | Date Posted: Friday, August 19, 2022



A Delaware State Trooper has pleaded guilty to Misuse of Computer System Information, Attorney General Kathy Jennings and Col. Melissa Zebley announced Friday.  The case was prosecuted by the Department of Justice’s Division of Civil Rights & Public Trust after Delaware State Police supervisors discovered and reported Boyda’s conduct.

James D. Boyda, a five-year veteran of the Delaware State Police, illegally disclosed protected information from NLETS, a criminal justice computer system that allows police access to New Jersey DMV records, after being misled by an associate.

Dennis Terry, an acquaintance of Boyda’s and a New Jersey resident, contacted Boyda in early March describing a vehicle that he was “having problems” with and asking Boyda to run the vehicle’s plates. Boyda responded that he would look into it. In actuality, and unbeknownst to Boyda, the vehicle was not harassing Terry but was parked in his ex-girlfriend’s driveway. Following a second request, Boyda provided Terry with the results of an NLETS inquiry, including the vehicle owner’s name and address. Terry subsequently used this information to harass his ex-girlfriend, who secured a restraining order against him; Terry currently faces criminal charges in New Jersey.

“It’s unsettling to think how easily this situation could have become worse,” said Attorney General Jennings. “I am not without empathy for the Defendant, whom the investigation made clear was misled by someone he believed to be his friend; but his lack of malice does not change the fact that his actions enabled the harassment of an innocent woman. Law enforcement and other criminal justice personnel undergo extensive training, including confidentiality requirements, before they are authorized to use systems like NLETS; this case should be a reminder why.”

“The Delaware State Police values our relationship with the public and as demonstrated in this case, has supervision, policies, and procedures in place to ensure the accountability of our members. We will continue to provide professional, competent, and compassionate law enforcement services to our communities,” said Delaware State Police Superintendent Colonel Melissa Zebley.

Boyda’s plea agreement commits him to an immediate six-month probation period in lieu of a suspended 12-month prison sentence, in addition to suspension of access to criminal justice data. His probation is dischargeable following completion of all requisite security and acceptable use trainings and appropriate re-certification on law enforcement computer systems.

image_printPrint


Graphic that represents delaware news on a mobile phone

Keep up to date by receiving a daily digest email, around noon, of current news release posts from state agencies on news.delaware.gov.

Here you can subscribe to future news updates.