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 Pages Tagged With: "artificial reef"

DNREC Sinks Ex-Navy and Army Freighter Turned Fishing Fleet Boat Reedville onto Delaware’s Artificial Reef System

DNREC continued to broaden the recreational allure of Delaware’s renowned artificial reef system today by sinking the Reedville, originally a World War II and Korean Conflict-era coastal freighter and supply ship at a reef site 16 miles offshore and with readings of *38 40.423’N 74* 44.295’ W at a depth of 87 feet. The Reedville was converted to a commercial fishing vessel after military decommissioning and has found another new life starting at 12:18 EDT as fish habitat on the ocean floor through DNREC’s artificial reef program.




M/V Twin Capes, retired Lewes-to-Cape May ferry, sunk to become part of Delaware’s artificial reef system

The M/V Twin Capes, a ferry christened 43 years ago on the Delaware Bay and retired after thousands of runs between her namesakes Cape Henlopen, Delaware, and Cape May, New Jersey, was sunk to become part of Delaware’s acclaimed artificial reef system.







 Pages Tagged With: "artificial reef"

DNREC Sinks Ex-Navy and Army Freighter Turned Fishing Fleet Boat Reedville onto Delaware’s Artificial Reef System

DNREC continued to broaden the recreational allure of Delaware’s renowned artificial reef system today by sinking the Reedville, originally a World War II and Korean Conflict-era coastal freighter and supply ship at a reef site 16 miles offshore and with readings of *38 40.423’N 74* 44.295’ W at a depth of 87 feet. The Reedville was converted to a commercial fishing vessel after military decommissioning and has found another new life starting at 12:18 EDT as fish habitat on the ocean floor through DNREC’s artificial reef program.




M/V Twin Capes, retired Lewes-to-Cape May ferry, sunk to become part of Delaware’s artificial reef system

The M/V Twin Capes, a ferry christened 43 years ago on the Delaware Bay and retired after thousands of runs between her namesakes Cape Henlopen, Delaware, and Cape May, New Jersey, was sunk to become part of Delaware’s acclaimed artificial reef system.