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State Rep. Collins visits Prince George’s Chapel in Dagsboro to celebrate accreditation by the American Alliance of Museums

Historical and Cultural Affairs | News | Sussex County | Date Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018



(DOVER, Del.—March 15, 2018)—State Rep. Richard G. Collins recently visited Prince George’s Chapel, located at 32040 Ward Lane in Dagsboro, Del., to celebrate the accreditation of the museum system of the State of Delaware by the American Alliance of Museums, the highest recognition afforded to museums in the United States. Administered by the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs, the system includes five state museums, over 40 historic properties and the state’s archaeological and historic-objects collections.

State Rep. Richard G. Collins visits Prince George’s Chapel in celebration of the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ accreditation by the American Alliance of Museums. With Collins is Crystal Hudson of the Friends of Prince George’s Chapel.
State Rep. Richard G. Collins visits Prince George’s Chapel in celebration of the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ accreditation by the American Alliance of Museums. With Collins is Crystal Hudson of the Friends of Prince George’s Chapel.

Developed and sustained by museum professionals for over 45 years, the alliance’s accreditation program is the field’s primary vehicle for quality assurance, self-regulation and public accountability. It strengthens the museum profession by promoting practices that enable leaders to make informed decisions, allocate resources wisely and remain financially and ethically accountable in order to provide the best possible service to the public.

American Alliance of Museums logo

Built in 1755, Prince George’s Chapel had its beginnings as an Anglican chapel-of-ease, serving the northern outlying area of Worcester Parish, Maryland. The chapel was named in honor of the English prince who would later become King George III. During the reorganization of the Episcopal Church following the American Revolution, the chapel became an independent parish church in the Diocese of Delaware. Acquired by the state of Delaware in 1967, it was restored and reopened in 1974.

Prince George’s Chapel
Prince George’s Chapel

The chapel is a superb example of 18th-century church architecture in the English tradition conceived for masonry but here executed in wood in an area where no other medium was readily available. Its most striking feature is the graceful barrel-vaulted ceiling of natural, unadorned heart-pine planks. The nave section remains as the original 18th century portion, while the east transept-end, with its great window and octagonal high-pulpit, has been reconstructed.

The site is managed by the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs and operated by the Friends of Prince George’s Chapel which opens it for public visitation at various times during the year. For visitor information, call 302-732-3777.

-End-

Contact:
Jim Yurasek
Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs
Phone: 302-739-7787
E-mail: Jim.Yurasek@state.de.us
Web: http://history.delaware.gov

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State Rep. Collins visits Prince George’s Chapel in Dagsboro to celebrate accreditation by the American Alliance of Museums

Historical and Cultural Affairs | News | Sussex County | Date Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018



(DOVER, Del.—March 15, 2018)—State Rep. Richard G. Collins recently visited Prince George’s Chapel, located at 32040 Ward Lane in Dagsboro, Del., to celebrate the accreditation of the museum system of the State of Delaware by the American Alliance of Museums, the highest recognition afforded to museums in the United States. Administered by the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs, the system includes five state museums, over 40 historic properties and the state’s archaeological and historic-objects collections.

State Rep. Richard G. Collins visits Prince George’s Chapel in celebration of the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ accreditation by the American Alliance of Museums. With Collins is Crystal Hudson of the Friends of Prince George’s Chapel.
State Rep. Richard G. Collins visits Prince George’s Chapel in celebration of the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ accreditation by the American Alliance of Museums. With Collins is Crystal Hudson of the Friends of Prince George’s Chapel.

Developed and sustained by museum professionals for over 45 years, the alliance’s accreditation program is the field’s primary vehicle for quality assurance, self-regulation and public accountability. It strengthens the museum profession by promoting practices that enable leaders to make informed decisions, allocate resources wisely and remain financially and ethically accountable in order to provide the best possible service to the public.

American Alliance of Museums logo

Built in 1755, Prince George’s Chapel had its beginnings as an Anglican chapel-of-ease, serving the northern outlying area of Worcester Parish, Maryland. The chapel was named in honor of the English prince who would later become King George III. During the reorganization of the Episcopal Church following the American Revolution, the chapel became an independent parish church in the Diocese of Delaware. Acquired by the state of Delaware in 1967, it was restored and reopened in 1974.

Prince George’s Chapel
Prince George’s Chapel

The chapel is a superb example of 18th-century church architecture in the English tradition conceived for masonry but here executed in wood in an area where no other medium was readily available. Its most striking feature is the graceful barrel-vaulted ceiling of natural, unadorned heart-pine planks. The nave section remains as the original 18th century portion, while the east transept-end, with its great window and octagonal high-pulpit, has been reconstructed.

The site is managed by the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs and operated by the Friends of Prince George’s Chapel which opens it for public visitation at various times during the year. For visitor information, call 302-732-3777.

-End-

Contact:
Jim Yurasek
Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs
Phone: 302-739-7787
E-mail: Jim.Yurasek@state.de.us
Web: http://history.delaware.gov

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Related Topics:  , , , , , , , , ,